Capstone Seminar for Graduate Students


Video of SPA Faculty, Library and IRB Chair explaining the graduate capstone & thesis
 

GRADUATE CAPSTONE & THESIS

Capstone/Thesis Orientation

The Capstone/Thesis Orientation for spring 2016 will be held on Thursday, March 17 in room 301 in the Academic Office Building from 5:30 - 7:30pm.

About Capstone Seminar

For graduate students, the Capstone Seminar is designed to integrate and synthesize the student's entire course of study. The course provides a process and structure for the School of Public Affairs faculty to be able to ensure that all graduates can demonstrate knowledge of the concepts and principles conveyed in the core curriculum of their degree and can apply that knowledge, and that gained from elective courses to analysis of contemporary issues in public administration (including the administration of nonprofit organizations) or criminal justice. The products of this seminar will be tangible evidence of a degree candidate's qualifications and expertise.

Students will complete a graduate-level project which demonstrates their ability to integrate the knowledge and skills they have gained from the Master of Criminal Justice (MCJ) or Master of Public Administration (MPA) programs. The project will enable students to demonstrate their:

  • Knowledge of theory, research, and practice in public administration and/or nonprofit management and/or criminal justice
  • Oral communication skills
  • Written communication skills
  • Critical thinking skills

The goals of the MPA and MCJ programs are to enhance students' skills in each of these areas so that students are able to effectively contribute to their fields and improve programs and policies.

For a more detailed description of the Capstone Seminar, take a look at a sample syllabus (online/on campus).

When dealing with human subjects and other sensitive information, it is important to know the policies and procedures that UCCS and federal regulations follow. The Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Subjects (IRB) is a committee dedicated to upholding these policies in order to protect human subjects. More information on this can be found on the Office of Sponsored Program's website.


Capstone Spotlight: Emergency Preparedness by Stuart Sockman, MPA

The Capstone Seminar in Public Administration and in Criminal Justice is designed to integrate and synthesize your entire course of study. The course provides a process and structure for the School of Public Affairs faculty to ensure that all graduates can demonstrate knowledge of the concepts and principles conveyed in the core curriculum of their degree and can apply that knowledge, and that gained from elective courses, to analysis of contemporary issues in public administration (including the administration of nonprofit organizations) or criminal justice. The products of this seminar will be tangible evidence of a degree candidate's qualifications and expertise.

Many students have organizations in mind for which they want to complete a capstone project. Capstone projects can be done with your employing organization, but must be outside the day to day responsibilities of your work. The School of Public Affairs (SPA) maintains a list of community organizations where students are conducting their projects. In any case, the final project -- whether one the student has found or one suggested through SPA -- must be approved by the course instructor for the semester you are taking the class.

Typically about 25 pages.

Early in the program. Students are encouraged to attend a Capstone Orientation at least two semesters prior to when you anticipate completing your capstone. Students can schedule a meeting with their advisor to begin exploring potential capstone ideas at any point in the program.

This question should be explored with the faculty member who will be teaching the course the semester you plan to take the course. You will also need to coordinate with your advisor.

It depends. The project needs to be outside the scope of your normal job duties. Usually this means that your client agency representative is someone other than your immediate supervisor. The clear advantage of using your employer as a client agency is that you are familiar with the agency, and presumably trusted by them. The disadvantage is that once you get started, it may be difficult to limit the scope of your project because this may mean saying "no" to your professional colleagues.

If you have not taken PAD 5003 or CJ 5361 and completed the training during that course, please complete the CITI training by going to https://www.citiprogram.org/Default.asp (Complete Option One Basic Human Research Course).

This is determined by the IRB Chair. Information about the IRB process can be obtained from the Office of Sponsored Programs //www.uccs.edu/~osp/. Direct inquiries can be made to IRB@uccs.edu.

Taking the capstone as part of a learning community will help you better understand the research process, and overcome the obstacles you inevitably face in moving from your research proposal (prospectus) to the finished product.

Your "first reader" is the instructor of record for the course. This person is responsible for working with you and the other two readers to help you successfully complete your project. Your "second reader" is a UCCS faculty member who is as subject-matter expert in your area of research. This person must review and approve your IRB proposal before the first reader signs off on it. Your "third reader" is the client agency representative responsible. While your first reader may offer suggestions of an appropriate second reader, it is your responsibility to contact this person, explain your project, and secure their approval for serving in this capacity. Once your project starts, your second reader will generally focus on project design, literature review, methodology, and conclusions and recommendations for further research. Your third reader will focus on access to data (information) within the client agency, and the soundness of your recommendations for organizational policy and/or practice. All three readers must attend the oral presentation of your project. The first reader assigns your course grade, after reviewing the feedback (rubric) completed by your second and third readers.

This FAQ is complex, and there is not one answer for every student. If you think you might be interested in writing a thesis, contact your advisor as early as possible.