Department of Sociology

Sociology Graduate Courses

Prer., Consent of instructor and graduate status.

  • 1-3 Credits

An intensive introduction to basic and intermediate statistics for graduate students.

  • 1 Credit

An intensive study of social theory for selected students entering the graduate program.

  • 1 Credit

Examines historical and contemporary theories of gender and sexuality; the course is structured around questions which consider the relationship between masculinities/femininities, ideologies of the family, and the politics of sexuality. Open only to graduate students and unclassified students with a bachelors degree.

  • 3 Credits

Introduction to professional sociology for graduate students. Course will explore careers in sociology and discuss research, teaching, and publishing as the relationship between academics and applied work. .

  • This course meets a requirement for the MA.
  • Prer., Graduate student in Sociology.
  • 1 Credit

Problems and procedures of research design and data analysis in social research. Topics covered include role of theory in research, hypothesis, testing, schedule construction, sampling, interviewing, scaling techniques, analysis procedures and report preparation.

  • This course meets a requirement for the MA.
  • Prer., SOC 3170
  • 4 Credits
  • This course meets requirements for the Advanced Research Methods Certificate

Practical experience in application and principles of research design and data processing to a social research problem selected by the instructor.

  • Prer., SOC 5070 or consent of instructor.
  • 3 Credits

Practical experience in teaching undergraduate sociology. Assisting course instructor in the pedagogical process of course development, lecture delivery, discussion facilitation, and student assessment.

  • Prer., Consent of instructor required.
  • 1-3 Credits
  • This course meets requirements for the Teaching Certificate.

Examines the social, political, and economic dimensions of homelessness. Emphasis on the extent, nature and causes of, and societal responses to, homelessness. The course is grounded in a service-learning format, which involves working with homeless service and advocacy organizations.

  • Prer., Graduate standing.
  • Meets with SOC 4110.
  • 3 Credits

This service-learning component is taken in conjunction with SOC 5110, Sociology of Homelessness. The student must volunteer as an intern in a community organization related to the substantive content of SOC 5110. Coreq., SOC 5110.

  • 1 Credit

A review of major sociological theorists of the 19th and 20th centuries. Will consider the major works of such pre-World War II writers as Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim and Max Weber and the post-war work of Foucault and others.

  • Prer., Graduate students only or consent of instructor.
  • 1 Credit

Explicit focus on continuing social theory and the sociology of knowledge, with special attention to the proposed nature of the relationship between knowledge and reality.

  • This course meets a requirement for the MA.
  • Prer., SOC 3150.
  • 3 Credits

Designed to provide student competence in the appropriate use and interpretation of statistical techniques through multivariate analysis. Advanced research methodology is also introduced. Instruction in the use and application of the SPSS computer program package is stressed. Includes practice in assessing and analyzing large scale databases.

  • This course meets a requirement for the MA.
  • Prer., SOC 3170.
  • Meets with SOC 4170.
  • 4 Credits
  • This course meets a requirement for the Advanced Research Methods Certificate.

Study of community variables; economic, cultural, political and social. Comprehensive analysis of race, class, gender, and ethnicity in community settings and review of a range of research methods.

  • This course meets a requirement for the MA.
  • This course meets a requirement for the Advanced Research Methods Certificate.
  • 3 Credits

An examination of the various perspectives, theories, and research on deviant behavior and its control.

  • 3 Credits

Provides an introduction to program evaluation principles and methods. Surveys research designs and methodological techniques commonly used to evaluate social programs and policies. Considers the social and political context of program evaluation and the reporting of evaluation studies.

  • Prer., Graduate status.
  • 3 Credits

Provides a sociological examination of the transformation of social welfare within both the United States and other industrialized nations. Emphasis is placed on the structural forces producing welfare reform, the strategies employed to achieve it, and the differential impact of this reform by race and gender.

  • Open only to junior/senior/grad level.
  • Prer., SOC 1110 and another 3-hour Soc. Meets with Soc 4210.
  • 3 Credits

SOC 5215 - Social Services and Welfare Reform - Service Learning Component

1 Credit

Description:
This service-learning component is taken in conjunction with SOC 5210 - Social Services and Welfare Reform. This component requires the student to volunteer as an intern in a community organization related to the substantive content of SOC 5210.

Study of theories and practical applications of sustainable urban development at the local, regional, national, and international levels. Focuses on the sociological dimensions of urban sustainability including social, racial and regional inequalities, power structures, and ideology. Course emphasizes fieldwork and collaborative learning in local settings.

  • Prer., Consent of instructor. Meets with SOC 4220.
  • 3 Credits

SOC 5225 - Sustainable Urban Development - Service Learning Component

1 Credit

Description:
This service-learning component is taken in conjunction with SOC 5220 - Sustainable Urban Development. This component requires the student to volunteer as an intern in a community organization related to the substantive content of SOC 5220.

SOC 5230 - Foundations of Disability Studies

3 Credits

Description:
This course introduces graduate students to the interdisciplinary field of disability studies. It covers: key concepts in disability studies, the history of people with disabilities, media representations of people with disabilities, bioethical issues involving people with disabilities, and disability culture. Graduate students only. Meets with SOC 4230.

  • 3 credits
  • This course meets requirements for both the Disability Studies certificate and the Diversity Certificate

Assumes a sociological perspective to critically deconstruct traditional and medical interpretations of the meaning of disability. Focuses on the historical and cultural conditions that have produced the condition of disability and how disability intersects with gender, race, class, and sexuality.

  • Prer., Open only to graduate students and unclassified students with a bachelor’s degree.
  • Class meets with SOC 4240.
  • 3 Credits

Intensive examination of the social and cultural organization of the urban complex. History, contemporary growth, and future of the city are major perspectives; cross-cultural aspects of urban development also are emphasized.

  • 3 Credits

SOC 5270 - Native Communities

3 Credits

Description:
Integrates theories of race and ethnicity with international development models to frame historic and contemporary challenges to indigenous sovereignty. Public policy and social structural opportunities and limitations are examined for their impact on cultural survival and access to resources. Prer., Graduate students only.

Advanced analysis of sport from a sociological perspective. This course studies sport as social phenomena, structural relations, and a field of experience that has developed over time. Theoretical perspectives include Marxism, critical race theory, feminist theory, post-structuralism, and figuration theory.

  • Prer., 9 hours of sociology and Graduate students only, or consent of instructor.
  • Meets with SL 5000, SOC 4300 and SLWEST 4300.
  • 3 Credits

Critical analysis of the theories and research on socioeconomic class and the reproduction of privilege, with a focus on the American class system. Addresses the prevailing cultural ideologies surrounding class as well as the ways in which class intersects with race, gender and sexuality.

  • Prer., Open only to graduate students and unclassified students with a bachelor’s degree.
  • Meets with SOC 4310 and WEST 4310.
  • 3 Credits

A sociological examination of the shifts occurring in African-American relationship formation and family formation strategies, with special emphasis on the impact of class, gender, sexuality, and their intersections. Emphasizes both the historical and contemporary theoretical explanations.

  • Prer., Graduate students only.
  • 3 Credits

Examination of religion as a social and cultural institution; impacts for communities and for society; shaping of religious identities, values, and practices; the role of religion in social control, social conflicts, and social change.

  • Open to Graduate students and Unclassified students with Bachelor’s Degree.
  • Meets with SOC 4320.
  • 3 Credits

SOC 5350 - Critical Analysis of Popular Culture

3 Credits (Minimum) 3 Credits (Maximum)


An introduction to a wide range of theoretical, analytical and methodological tools for interrogating media texts. Students will critically analyze an array of media texts from film and television, to music and comic books, through a variety of prisms: rhetorical, feminist, semiotic, ideological, historical, textual, cultural, and more. Grad only or instructor consent. Meets with COMM 4350 and COMM 6350.

Advanced analysis of major themes and questions in the sociology of culture. Includes study of the production of culture, effects of culture on society, how culture stratifies, and culture as national difference.

  • Prer., Graduate standing; undergraduates with permission of instructor.
  • 3 Credits

SOC 5370 - Sociology of Media and Popular Culture

3 Credits

Description:
This course draws on cultural theory and history to explore the interdisciplinary field of media studies from a critical sociological perspective. The ultimate goal of the course is to critically interrogate a large part of students' lives that is typically taken for granted. Meets with COMM 5370.

Analyzes the evolution of global interdependency. Studies the interaction between local and global levels in the development process and impacts on economic, cultural, technological, environmental, ideological and political systems. Discusses transnational organizations, global women’s agency, social justice movements, and human rights networks.

  • Meets with SOC 4380.
  • 3 Credits

Examines the impact that categories of difference have on our lives, the nature of discrimination in society, and how systems of inequality and oppression are maintained and perpetuated. Finally, solutions for a more equitable world are identified.

  • Meets with SOC 4390.
  • 3 Credits

Sociological approaches in the study of the self, role theory, persons in situations, identifications, socialization, and other characteristics of persons in society. Studies of group processes bearing upon personality processes.

  • 3 Credits

SOC 5450 - Global Field Experience in Sociology
3 Credits

Description:
Students develop sociological and interdisciplinary competencies through travel, academic assignments and structured field experience in globalized communities. Alternating topics/locations emphasize how academic knowledge informs real-world endeavors. Includes additional non-tuition costs. May be repeated once with different topic or location. Meets with SOC 4450.

 

Field based investigation of specific aspects of society, communities or social contexts. Topic and credit vary.

  • Prer., Consent of instructor.
  • 1-6 Credits

Recent trends in research and theory with emphasis on the American family in a comparative perspective. Family function and dysfunction will be considered.

  • 3 Credits

Participate in supervised activities in a structured program to facilitate learning in conjunction with concurrent cognate course. One hour class time per week plus 3 hours internship for each one hour of credit.

  • Meets with SOC 4560.
  • 3 Credits

SOC 5570 - Gamification, Simulation, and Society

3 Credits

Description:
Critically explores the lessons video games offer as a roadmap for changing human behavior and social reality. Broadly explains the benefits and detriments of using gamification to make everyday life more interesting, meaningful, and engaging. Prer., SOC 1110 or consent of instructor. Meets with SOC 4570.

This course is designed for students who plan to teach and are committed to creating an inclusive classroom that incorporates a diverse and inclusive curriculum. The course examines a wide range of topics related to sociological teaching, curriculum, and pedagogy.

  • 3 Credits

Focuses on the practical development of pedagogical skills involved in teaching sociology at the university level. Syllabus development, seminar facilitation, lecture skills, and assessment will be covered.

  • Prer., Graduate students only.
  • 3 Credits

This course focuses on the global operation of capitalism as an economic and social system. Since capitalism is a global phenomenon and this class centrally focuses on capitalism, especially a highly globalized stage of neoliberal capitalism, the entire focus of the course is on global awareness. So while much of the class focuses on the Unites States because it is currently the world's leading political and economic power, it constantly looks at the global flows of capital and how the logic of capital unfolds throughout the world.

  • Prer., SOC 1110, SOC 3150, or SOC 3250./li>
  • 3 Credits

This class is an exploration of relationships with technology, new media, cyborgs, and futurism. Students will critically examine the meanings of digital ubiquity and connectivity and its ramifications on the social tapestry of the recent past, present, and future.

  • 3 Credits

Course focuses on privilege, power, and the intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality. Focusing on privilege provides US with a fuller understanding of oppression and the dynamics of inequality. This course explores the complicated ways in which race, gender, class and sexuality interact and impinge upon each other in our own lives, the lives of others, across the U.S. culture and social institutions.

  • Open only to graduate students and unclassified students with a bachelors degree.
  • 3 Credits

This course identifies how inequality is defined, measured, studied, and understood by geographers. Students will analyze quantitative and qualitative data sources to explain inequality in the U.S., and will conduct research identifying spaces of inequality in Colorado Springs.

  • Meets with SOC 4680, WEST 4680, GES 4680, GES 5680.
  • 4 Credits

Identifies broad trends and changes in feminist interpretations and approaches to sexual politics, race, migration, religion, geopolitics, and globalization. a global look at women’s oppression and strategies of resisting subordination through various transnational feminist praxis, theory, and case studies.

  • 3Meets with SOC 4700 and WEST 4700. Credits

SOC 5705 - Global Feminisms - Service Learning Component

1 Credits

Description:
This service-learning component is taken in conjunction with SOC 5700 - Global Feminisms. This component requires the student to volunteer as an intern in a community organization related to the substantive content of SO

A rigorous examination of macro-level theory in race/ethnic relations and its applicability both to race/ethnic relations case studies drawn from a number of societies and to the general topics of ethnic communities, protest and change, assimilation, prejudice-discrimination, and contemporary social policies.

  • This course meets a requirement for the MA
  • 1-3 Credits
  • This course meets requirement for both the Diversity certificate and Advanced Research Methods Certificate

Analysis of legal procedures from a sociological perspective, focusing on theoretical development and critical analysis.

  • 3 Credits

Theories of causation of crime as a social phenomenon. Theories of rehabilitation and disposition of cases.

  • Meets with CJ 5120.
  • 4 Credits

Factors involved in delinquent behavior. Problems of adjustments of delinquents and factors in treatment and post-treatment and adjustment.

  • Meets with SOC 4960
  • 3 Credits

In order to obtain an independent study course, the student must submit a written description of learning objectives and procedures to a full-time faculty member. Each faculty member may supervise a maximum of three students per semester. This course specifically allows individual students to study intensively in areas which are within the fields of specialization of faculty members but not offered as a regular part of the course curriculum.

  • 1-6 Credits

n order to obtain an independent study course, the student must submit a written description of learning objectives and procedures to a full-time faculty member. Each faculty member may supervise a maximum of three students per semester. This course is specifically to allow individual students to study intensively in areas which are within the fields of specialization of faculty members but not offered as a regular part of the course curriculum. Offered annually.

  • 1-4 Credits

Masters Thesis

  • 1-6 Credits

Candidate for Degree

     
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