Department of Languages & Cultures

American Sign Language Courses

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This is the first in a related series of courses that focus on the use and study of American Sign Language (ASL), the language that is widely used by Deaf Americans. This course includes basic ASL vocabulary, grammatical structures, and in-depth cultural awareness. Non-manual behavior, ASL structure, and fluency are included to challenge students' ability to increase expressive and receptive skills in ASL. Students are introduced to the cultural values, beliefs, and behavioral norms shared by those within the Deaf community.

  • 4 Credits

This is the second in a related series of courses that focus on the use and study of American Sign Language (ASL), the language that is widely used by Deaf Americans. This course includes intermediate ASL vocabulary, grammatical structures, conversational behaviors, and in-depth cultural awareness. Non-manual behavior, ASL structure, and fluency are included to challenge students’ ability to increase expressive and receptive skills in ASL. Students are introduced to the cultural values, beliefs, and behavioral norms shared by those within the Deaf community. This course is designed for students who have completed a minimum of ASL I. Prer., ASL 1010.

  • 4 Credits

The third in a related series of courses that focus on the use and study of American Sign Language (ASL), the language that is widely used by Deaf Americans. This course continues to increase ASL vocabulary, grammatical structures, and in-depth cultural awareness. Non-manual behavior, ASL structure, and fluency are included to challenge students’ ability to increase expressive and receptive skills in ASL. An intermediate course designed for students who have completed a minimum of ASL I and ASL II. Prer., ASL 1010, ASL1020.

  • 4 Credits

The fourth in a related series of courses that focus on the use and study of American Sign Language (ASL), the language that is widely used by Deaf Americans. This course provides the opportunity to develop and use stories and language activities in both receptive and expressive modes. Non-manual behavior, ASL structure, and fluency are included to challenge students’ ability to increase expressive and receptive skills in ASL. Offers a more in-depth discussion of the principles of ASL. Presents further exposure to more sophisticated dialogue. Prer., ASL 1010, ASL1020, ASL 2110.

  • 4 Credits

This course will aid students in developing increased fluency in their expressive and receptive abilities at ASL fingerspelling, one of the hardest ASL skills to master. The course will also aid students in navigating the complex rules of ASL numbering. This course provides targeted development of students’ skills in fingerspelled word and numbering recognition in ASL. This course focuses on specific skills that underlie the fingerspelled word recognition process, and provides practice in correctly recognizing fingerspelled words and numbers in context. In addition to receptive skill development, students will hone their articulation and production of fingerspelling and numbering. Taught in ASL.

* Prerequisite: ASL 2110 or requisite experience

This is the fifth in a related series of courses that focus on the use and study of American Sign Language (ASL), the language that is widely used by Deaf Americans. This course provides the opportunity to develop and use stories and language activities in both receptive and expressive modes. Non-manual behavior, ASL structure, and fluency are included to challenge students’ ability to increase expressive and receptive skills in ASL at an advanced level. It offers a more in-depth discussion of the principles of ASL and comparison of communication methodologies. Presents further exposure to more sophisticated dialogue. Prer., ASL 2120.

  • 4 Credits

Provides students with an opportunity to recognize the impact of Deaf Culture on emerging ASL literature. The course also covers non-fiction, poetry, and drama depicted in reading and videotapes related to everyday lives of deaf people. It develops insight and appreciation of deaf literature and its implications for deaf education. Original works will be studied, analyzed, and compared. An intermediate course for students who have completed a minimum of ASL I, II, and III. Prer., ASL 1010, ASL 1020, ASL 2110.

  • 3 Credits

Examines the culture of deaf people. The course will explore the customs, values, norms and heritage of the deaf community in America. Prer., ASL 1010 and ASL 1020. Meets with FCS 3590.

  • 3 Credits

The Department of Languages and Cultures will offer to advanced language students the opportunity for supervised application of their knowledge in settings such as schools, social support agencies, etc. May be repeated up to three times for credit. Prer., Departmental permission.

  • 1 to 3 Credits

An introduction to basic similarities and differences in the linguistic structures and uses of American Sign Language (ASL) and English. Examining categories from a universal perspective, contrastive linguistic analysis is accomplished by focusing on: phonological and morphological processes, syntactic properties, discourse types, word classes, and linguistic variation in Deaf and non-deaf communities in the United States. The student will also analyze both ASL and English language samples. Prer., Junior/Senior and Graduate only; ASL 2120 or equivalent.

  • 3 Credits

An introduction to basic similarities and differences in the linguistic structures and uses of American Sign Language (ASL) and English. Examining categories from a universal perspective, contrastive linguistic analysis is accomplished by focusing on: phonological and morphological processes, syntactic properties, discourse types, word classes, and linguistic variation in Deaf and non-deaf communities in the United States. The student will also analyze both ASL and English language samples. Prer., Junior/Senior and Graduate only; ASL 2120 or equivalent.

  • 3 Credits

Independent work for advanced undergraduates only. By special arrangement with the faculty. Only for students presenting strong preparation in American Sign Language. May be repeated up to three times for credit. Prer., Consent of instructor.

  • 1 to 4 Credits

Independent work for advanced undergraduates only. By special arrangement with the faculty. Only for students presenting strong preparation in American Sign Language. May be repeated up to three times for credit. Prer., Consent of instructor.

  • 1 to 3 Credits
 
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