Department of Geography & Environmental Studies

GES Graduate Courses

Research-oriented quantitative methods seminar. Advanced data analysis techniques for use in geographic and environmental research. Meets with GES 4000.

  • 4 Credits

An analysis of research topics and methodologies in geography. Students will define a research topic, review literature in their field of interest, and prepare a research proposal. Prer., BA or BS.

  • 3 Credits

The course provides theoretical and practical experience in qualitative methods commonly used in geography and other social sciences. Methods covered include interviewing, participatory action research, observation, discourse analysis, questionnaires, and historical research. Req., GES 1990 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 4020.

  • 3 Credits

Information Systems (GIS) as a research tool. Students will use ESRI software to complete a series of geographic projects and pursue the application of GIS to their own research areas. Prer., GES 3030 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 3030.

  • 4 Credits

This course introduces the basic principles of image interpretation and analysis. Through lab and project work, students will explore a variety of data sources and examine the methodological and logistical considerations central to the acquisition and interpretation of aerial photography and digital imagery. Req., GES 2050 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 4060 and ENSC 4060.

  • 4 Credits

Students will learn the principles, concepts, methods and applications of geovisualization. Students will have hands-on experience in using highly interactive, dynamic and multidimensional geovisualization systems that offer high levels of user experience.

  • 4 Credits

Continued application of GIS for spatial analysis. Students will learn ESN software and complete original research projects in their field of interest. Prer., GES 4050, GES 5050 or instructor consent. Meets with GES 4080.

  • 4 Credits

Explores the theory of GPS, provide practical experience using GPS units, and explore the interaction between GIS and GPS through use of ESRI, and Trimble Pathfinder software. Req., GES 2050 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 4100.

  • 3 Credits

Students will learn the fundamentals of Internet GIS technology and develop hands-on experience in programming and implementing Internet mapping applications using various tools including ESRI ArcServer, Google Maps, and JavaScript APIs. Prer., Introduction to GIS (GIS 4050/5050) or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 4120.

  • 4 Credits

The fundamental concepts of customizing and programming GIS. Students will develop hands-on experience in creating custom and more usable GIS applications using various tools including ESRI’s Arcgis and GIS programming languages such as Python. Prer., GES 4050 or GES 5050. Meets with GES 4130.

  • 4 Credits

Practicum and/or tutorial, by special arrangement only, in the teaching of geography (for example, serving as small-group leaders or proctors in introductory courses, or developing and/or testing curriculum materials). Students work closely with faculty in developing new instructional materials and interact with students using those materials. Open to graduate students only. Instructor Consent Required.

  • 2 to 4 Credits

A course outlining methods of teaching geography in K-12. Includes discussion of important geographic concepts and their integration into the classroom. Students will develop teaching activities and materials for incorporation into their curriculum. Prer., Consent of instructor.

  • 0.5 to 4 Credits

Intensive work in using various forms of data and field investigation for analysis of geographic problems. Case studies and field experience. Meets with GES 4460.

  • 2 to 4 Credits

The physical processes involved with the development and transportation of weather systems. Selected topics include relationships between upper atmospheric flow and surface weather phenomena, synoptic evaluation of air masses and techniques for environmental analysis. Prer., GES 1000. Meets with GES 4220.

  • 3 Credits

An examination of the distribution of life on the Earth’s surface. The relationship between environmental factors and plant and animal distributions will be the central theme. Changes in distributions through time will also be examined. Required field trip. Prer., GES 1000 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 4260.

  • 4 Credits

A project-oriented class with students studying the distribution of plants as related to environmental factors. This class will combine lecture, field work, and data processing; resulting in maps and reports. Prer., GES 4260, GES 5260 or instructor consent. Meets with GES 4270.

  • 4 Credits

An examination of plant assemblages in Colorado. Major plant communities will be examined in the context of environmental factors such as climate and land forms. Required field trip. Prer., GES 4260, GES 5260 or instructor permission. Meets with GES 4290, BIOL 4290, and BIOL 5290.

  • 4 Credits

Same as GES 4320 but will include additional research work. Field trips optional. Prer., GES 1000 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 4320.

  • 3 Credits

In-depth study of techniques used in analyzing soil classification systems for global soils. Problems in human use and misuse of soils. Prer., GES 1010, GEOL 1010, or instructor consent. Chemistry recommended. Meets with GES 4340.

  • 4 Credits

This course for middle and high school teachers will include field work, utilizing terrain and geological formations to compare and contrast earth with other planets. This course does not satisfy any requirements for the GES Master of Applied Geography Degree or the Master of Sciences. Meets with CURR 5540.

  • 3 Credits

An investigation of environmental problems with emphasis on land-planning and land use, pollution, water, energy and natural hazards. Prer., Consent of instructor. Meets with GES 4410.

  • 3 Credits

Examines the legacy of public lands in the U.S. and whether management policies have evolved from an emphasis on resource extraction to one focused upon conservation. Topics will include national parks, forests, recreation, and wildlife conservation. Meets with GES 4420.

  • 3 Credits

Problems associated with development of environmental impact studies. Case examples and field work. Meets with GES 4450.

  • 3 Credits

Specific land and resource use problems in Colorado. In-depth analysis of interacting systems of natural resources and human decision-making processes. Meets with GES 4480.

  • 3 Credits

Experience of water resource management in the United States, prospects for the future and problem solving techniques. Critical analysis of issues important in the western United States. Meets with GES 4500.

  • 3 Credits

Exploration of the principles of hydrology and their applications to environmental investigations. Meets with GES 4510.

  • 3 Credits

The impact of extreme geophysical events on human society. Emphasis upon adaptations to extreme events and ways of reducing vulnerability and damage. Meets with GES 4550.

  • 3 Credits

Considers how ecological conditions and sociopolitical systems are inherently linked. Major topics include environmental narratives, energy development, the role of technology in society, and sustainable development across a range of geographical contexts. Meets with GES 4560.

  • 3 Credits

Considers how military activities shape and influence diverse landscapes. Extending from traditional strategic considerations of geography, the course takes a critical look at militarism at home and abroad, and during times of war and peace, and the changing role of sustainability in militarization. Meets with GES 4570.

  • 3 Credits

Students will learn to interpret the American cultural landscape, particularly everyday surroundings that they frequently take for granted. You will see clues about our culture and society from modifications to the natural terrain, including the cities in which we live. Meets with GES 4600.

  • 3 Credits

Course addresses topics in urban location, urban morphology and design, urban function, and urban social issues. We analyze why cities look as they do and the role cities play in society. Emphasis is on cities in the United States. Meets with GES 4610.

  • 3 Credits

This seminar provides a global perspective on the nature of urbanization, the forces behind these patterns, and resulting effects on social, political, economic, and environmental organization and governance of the world’s largest mega-cities (cities with a total population of 10 million+ people).

  • 3 Credits

Examines landscapes of restoration and their environmental, economic, ethical, and practical implications in order to develop a robust understanding of restoration, its relationship to geography, and how it takes place across a region. Meets with GES 4650.

  • 4 Credits

This course explores the human-environment interactions within urban settings. Special consideration is given to measuring patterns of change, and to social and ecological feedbacks in urbanized lands. This is a field-based course which involves collecting and analyzing primary data. Meets with GES 4660.

  • 3 Credits

his course identifies how inequality is defined, measured, studied, and understood by geographers. Students will analyze quantitative and qualitative data sources to explain inequality in the U.S., and will conduct research identifying spaces of inequality in Colorado Springs. Meets with GES 4680, WEST 4680, SOC 4680, and SOC 5680.

  • 4 Credits

This course examines international population processes and patterns. First, past, present, and future dynamics of population growth are investigated. Second, varying perspectives on ?overpopulation? (neo-Malthusian, cornucopian, distributionist) are discussed. Third, we show how in-depth case studies of the population geography of particular places and spaces shape the world around us. Meets with GES 4730.

  • 3 Credits

Examines the historical geographies of recreation and tourism, and the environmental and cultural impacts of the ski industry in Colorado, international ecotourism, and contemporary trends of recreational values and activities. Meets with GES 4750.

  • 3 Credits

A history of geographical ideas from Greek classical efforts through the 19th century. Meets with GES 4770.

  • 3 Credits

Provides a global perspective on the nature of migration, the forces behind these patterns, and their effects in sending and receiving societies. Students will delve into several literatures, lead weekly sessions, and introduce perspectives on international migration. Meets with GES 4780.

  • 3 Credits

Addresses four geographical topics of food: 1) The political economy of food production; 2) food production and the environment; 3) food and cultures; and, 4) food and nutrition. Students will better appreciate our complex relationship with food. Meets with GES 4920.

  • 3 Credits

Advanced data processing using digital image models and Geographic Information Systems. Students will be responsible for extensive individual project design and completion. Prer., GES 5170 or GES 4090/GES 5090.

  • 4 Credits

Master’s Thesis. Instructor Consent Required.

  • 1 to 6 Credits

Independent work for undergraduates. By special arrangement with faculty only. Only for students presenting strong geography preparation. Instructor Consent Required.

  • 1 to 4 Credits

Independent work for graduate students. By special arrangement with faculty only. Prer., Consent of instructor.

  • 1 to 4 Credits

Independent work for graduate students. By special arrangement with faculty only. Prer., Instructor Consent Required.

  • 1 to 4 Credits

Candidate for Degree. Instructor Consent Required.

  • 0 Credits
 
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