English Upper-Division Level Courses

Introduces students to foundational concepts in critical theory and practice. Readings and written assignments encompass a variety of genres and approaches. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2010.

  • 3 Credits

Writing workshop that offers students the opportunity to work on advanced writing projects and enhance their repertoire of rhetorical strategies. Specific writing projects may vary. The sections of ENGL 3010 also emphasize instructional strategies for managing the writing process in public school settings. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive. Prer., ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1410 or ENGL 2080 or ENGL 2090 or INOV 2100 or their equivalents.

  • 3 Credits

Extends writing and rhetorical strategies mastered in the core composition sequence. Students further develop research and argument skills. Topics and research sites may vary. Prer., ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1410 or equivalents.

  • 3 Credits

For students with previous formal experience studying and practicing the craft of poetry. Students read and write extensively to develop their own poetic voices while opening themselves to the varieties of influence that others can have on their writing. A focus on student work and workshop promotes further exploration and experimentation with poetic craft and technique, including such elements as image, voice, sound, rhythm, and structure. Prer., ENGL 2030 or consent of instructor.

  • 3 Credits

In this course students will read and write creative nonfiction: memoir, lyric and segmented essays, literary journalism, and cultural criticism. Writers in this genre are reworking familiar forms, bringing them to life with voice and scenes, while respecting that creative nonfiction emerges from real experiences. Students will locate their own material and develop their voices to shape a variety of creative work to be examined in workshops. Prer., ENGL 2040 or consent of instructor.

  • 3 Credits

For students with previous formal experience studying and practicing the craft of literary short fiction. Students read and write extensively to expand their working knowledge of the genre and refine their execution of such craft elements as characterization, plot, setting, dialogue, point of view, language, and scene. The class focuses on student work and workshop and emphasizes originality and dedication to craft. Prer., ENGL 2050.

  • 3 Credits

This course offers scope and variety not captured by other creative writing courses (introductory multi-genre course, intermediate poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction courses, as well as advanced course). Students taking this course will be challenged to move beyond the developmental sequence in creative writing, broadening their sophistication and expertise in the discipline of creative writing. May be repeated for credit. Prer., ENGL 1310 or equivalent, intermediate creative writing (any genre) or permission of the instructor.

  • 3 Credits

Writing workshop where students work on advanced business and administrative writing projects. Focus is on rhetorical strategies, document design principles, developing an understanding of ethics, and evaluating and synthesizing a variety of texts into students’ own research and writing. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive. Prer., ENGL 2080 or ENGL 2090.

  • 3 Credits

Provides a theoretical, historical, and practical study of grammar and the rules governing language use, particularly as they apply to professional writing. The emphasis is on the standard conventions of grammar, usage, mechanics, and syntax. Students will practice a variety of techniques for applying these skills to their own writing. Prer., ENGL 1310.

  • 3 Credits

Focuses on editing strategies for improving the stylistic features of professional writing. In particular, it is concerned with a document’s organization, clarity, conciseness, consistency, completeness, and accuracy. Students will practice a variety of techniques for applying these skills to their own writing. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive. Prer., ENGL 1310 and ENGL 3110.

  • 3 Credits

Examines print and web-based design strategies in specific types of documents for a variety of professional audiences. Each project requires a proposal, a progress report, and a preliminary draft for peer review before submission of the final copy. Prer., ENGL 2080 or ENGL 2090.

  • 3 Credits

Provides a theoretical framework for managing writing projects and practice in working collaboratively in self-managed teams. Each team completes major writing projects collaboratively produced. Prer., ENGL 2080 or ENGL 2090.

  • 3 Credits

Gives students an opportunity to apply writing theory to a work environment and to gain practical experience in writing on the job. Working for an organization participating in the Internship Program, students perform 40 hours of writing-related duties over the course of the semester for 1 credit, 80 hours for 2 credits, and 120 hours for 3 credits. Interns are evaluated by a supervisor at the host organization, keep a weekly log of their experiences, and write a final report to the instructor, summarizing and evaluating their internship experience. Prer., ENGL 3120.

  • 3 Credits

Students will learn to use the standard software tools critical to technical writers in print and online documentation, for example, Framemaker, Adobe Acrobat, MS Word, MS Powerpoint, Frontpage, and Paintshop Pro among others. Prer., ENGL 2080 or ENGL 2090.

  • 3 Credits

Study of women writers with attention to issues of authorship, gender and diversity. Fulfills the English department’s diversity requirement. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Prer., ENGL 1500 or ENGL 2010.

  • 3 Credits

A study of the works by American masters of fiction, poetry, drama, and prose non-fiction, emphasizing the relationship of the literature to its cultural and historical contexts. Examining works of cultural diversity and giving various perspectives of America, the course includes readings by Native-American, African American, Asian American, and Latino/a writers. Approved for LAS Humanities area and Cultural Diversity requirements. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Explore-Arts, Humanities, and Cultures. Non-English majors only. Prer., ENGL 1310 or equivalent and ENGL 1500 or ENGL 2010.

  • 3 Credits

May include literatures of encounter, of transatlantic colonialism, the captivity narrative, Romanticism, Whitman, and/or literatures of abolition. Topics and instructors may vary. May be repeated for credit with permission of department. Fulfills the English department’s historical breadth requirement in American literature before 1900. Prer., ENGL 1310 and ENGL 2010 for majors; or ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1500 for non-majors.

  • 3 Credits

May include the literatures of revolution, the sentimental novel and/or poetics, early American women’s writings, Transcendentalism, early American gothic, literatures of Native American removal and resistance, the slave narrative, and the literatures of abolition. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. This course fulfills the English department’s historical breadth requirement in American literature before 1900. Prer., ENGL 1310 and ENGL 2010 for English majors; ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1500 for non-majors.

  • 3 Credits

May include the early American novel, American gothic, Transcendentalism, the literatures of slavery and abolition, the poetics of Whitman and/or Dickinson, realism, naturalism, literatures of western expansion, and/or the New Woman. Topics and instructors may vary. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. This course fulfills the English department’s historical breadth requirement in American literature before 1900. Prer., ENGL 1310 and ENGL 2010 for English majors; ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1500 for non-majors.

  • 3 Credits

This course may include the study of the Realist novel, the Naturalist novel, “Jazz Age” literature, the Harlem Renaissance, the modernist novel, avant-garde poetics, and/or social realism. Topics and instructors may vary. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. Fulfills the English department’s historical breadth requirement in American literature after 1900. Prer., ENGL 1310 and ENGL 2010 for majors; or ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1500 for non-majors.

  • 3 Credits

May include the postwar novel, the modern short story, the Beat movement, literary minimalism, postmodernism, multi-ethnic literature, non-fiction, and/or contemporary literature. Topics and instructors may vary. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. Fulfills the English department’s historical breadth requirement in American literature after 1900. Prer., ENGL 1310 and ENGL 2010 for majors; or ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1500 for non-majors.

  • 3 Credits

This course is modeled after June Jordan’s project of the same name at the University of California at Berkeley. It focuses on the writing and scholarship of poetry and seeks ways for poetry to have meaning in students’ lives, particularly through required community outreach. The course emphasizes diversity. Prer., ENGL 1310 and ENGL 2010.

  • 3 Credits

Explores the cultural currents during the 16th and 17th centuries through four important literary genres: lyric, drama, epic/romance, and various forms of prose. Prer., ENGL 1310, ENGL 1500, or ENGL 2010.

  • 3 Credits

Provides students with the necessary cultural and literary background required to understand and appreciate some of the major works of Native American literature. Fulfills the English department’s diversity requirement. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2010.

  • 3 Credits

Provides students with the necessary cultural and literary background required to understand and appreciate some of the major works of African-American Literature. Fulfills the English department’s diversity requirement. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2010, and ENGL 3000.

  • 3 Credits

A study of representations and theories of gender and sexuality. The course combines theoretical approaches to gender and sexuality, such as psychoanalysis, feminism, performance theory, and queer theory, with an intensive study of representations of gender and sexuality in literature and film. May be repeated once with permission of department chair. Prer., ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1410 or equivalent, ENGL 2010.

  • 3 Credits

Introduces students to the rhetorical process of grant and proposal writing: identifying a problem, generating ideas to solve the problem, finding potential sponsors, analyzing requests for proposals, and planning, developing, and submitting the grant proposal. Prer., ENGL 2080 or ENGL 2090.

  • 3 Credits

Study of Writing Center theory and practice. Students will participate in weekly observations and consultations in the Writing Center. Students in all majors are encouraged to enroll. Required for employment as a Writing Consultant at the Writing Center. Prer., ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1410; or ENGL 2080, ENGL 2090, or INOV 2100.

  • 3 Credits

Course examines the inquiry processes in the Sciences, Social Sciences and Humanities, and how that knowledge is expressed through specific writing styles, forms and conventions. Students will complete a practicum component either in the Writing Center or classroom. Prer., ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1410.

  • 3 Credits

Learn the ways Rhetoric has shifted from a system of tropes, figures, and imitation to discovering multiple sites of epistemology and inquiry, drawing on art, literature, culture, and theory. Read and write about canonical and contemporary rhetorical texts and ideas. Prer., ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1410.

  • 3 Credits

In this course, students intensively study selected topics in professional writing. Topics and instructors vary from semester to semester. Prer., ENGL 2080 or ENGL 2090.

  • 1 Credit (Minimum) - 3 Credits (Maximum)

While the topic varies by semester and instructor, this course will focus on national awareness and/or global awareness through the study of how literature and socio-political conditions are reciprocally influenced. Approved for LAS Humanities area requirement. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2010.

  • 3 Credits

Topics will vary from semester to semester. Check Fall and Spring schedules. May be taken up to two times for credit with permission of department chair. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Explore-Arts, Humanities, and Cultures; Writing Intensive. Prer., ENGL 1500 or ENGL 2010.

  • 1 Credit (Minimum) - 3 Credits (Maximum)

Study of major works with emphasis on “Canterbury Tales.” Readings will be in middle English; short introduction to the language will precede study of the poetry. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, and either ENGL 1500 or ENGL 2010.

  • 3 Credits

Comedies and Histories. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2010.

  • 3 Credits

Tragedies and Romances. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, and either ENGL 1500 or ENGL 2010.

  • 3 Credits

Advanced, in-depth study of the theoretical, historical, and practical aspects of technical and professional writing across diverse contexts, such as gender, race, sexuality, and socio-economic factors. Theoretical and historical contests shift with topics. Topics vary, may be taken up to twice with different topic. Requisites: ENGL 2080 or 2090 and ENGL 3080 or equivalent courses, or instructor approval. Meets with ENGL 5060. Approved for LAS Cultural Diversity requirement.

  • 3 Credits

A study of the theoretical, historical, and practical aspects of technical and professional writing across cultures – including issues of translation, localization, international design, and/or communicating globally through various technologies. Requisites: ENGL 2080 or 2090 and ENGL 3080 or equivalent courses, or instructor approval. Approved for LAS Global Awareness requirement. Meets with ENGL 5065.

  • 3 Credits

Advanced, in-depth study of the theoretical and practical aspects shaping the discipline of professional and technical writing, including the diverse historical and cultural contributions and accomplishments of theorists and practitioners. Theorists, practitioners, and historical contexts shift with topics. Can be repeated for credit with permission of instructor as long as topics are different. Prer., ENGL 3080, Junior or Senior standing.

  • 3 Credits

The Senior Portfolio is a compilation of the written, visual, digital, and design work that represents the student as a professional/technical communicator. The purpose is to demonstrate who the student is as a professional/technical communicator. Senior Portfolios are due at the time of portfolio presentations. Prer., Senior standing. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Summit.

  • 3 Credits

Advanced seminar focusing on the study and practice of a single literary genre: poetry, creative nonfiction, or fiction. Students participate in a mature workshop community. Through a variety of reading, writing, and discussion projects students exhibit a sophisticated understanding of craft theory and its bearing on practice. Students bring a high level of dedication and a demonstrated proficiency to their craft, and take initiative in shaping their further development and vision as writers. Genres vary. Prer., ENGL 3030, ENGL 3040, or ENGL 3050, depending on the genre of focus, or instructor permission.

  • 3 Credits

Traces the emergence of the novel from its subliterary roots in early 18th century to its stunning transformation by early 19th century. Examines historical context, narrative techniques, theory of character, and major themes. Authors include Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, and Austen. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2010, and ENGL 3000. Meets with ENGL 5200.

  • 3 Credits

Continuation of ENGL 4200, but may be taken without previous novel course. Examines major British novels of the 19th century and early 20th century. Authors include the Brontes, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2010, and ENGL 3000. Meets with ENGL 5210.

  • 3 Credits

Study of the American novel from its beginnings, with the work of Charles Brockden Brown, through the 19th century, concluding with the work of Henry James. Will examine both artistic development of American writers and the novels’ functions as vehicles of cultural history. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2000, ENGL 2010, and ENGL 3000. Meets with ENGL 5230.

  • 3 Credits

Continuation of ENGL 4230. Covers development of the “Modern” realistic novel, from beginning of the 20th century through 1945, and examines work of Wharton, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Dreiser, Wright and others. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2010, and ENGL 3000. Meets with ENGL 5240.

  • 3 Credits

Study of major novelists and developments in the genre, with emphasis on British and American novels written since 1965. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2010, and ENGL 3000. Meets with ENGL 5250.

  • 3 Credits

Advanced study of such topics as American Gothic, antebellum American literature, and the literature of the American Cold War era. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Summit. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2010, and ENGL 3000. Meets with ENGL 5300.

  • 3 Credits

Seminar in literature of the movement commonly known as the “Harlem Renaissance,” spanning the 1910s through the 1930s. May include jazz and 1920s cultural studies. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Summit. Prer., ENGL 1310, ENGL 3000.

  • 3 Credits

Topics may include medieval epic and romance, lyric poetry, dramatic comedy, medieval comedy, satire. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2010, and ENGL 3000. Meets with ENGL 5400.

  • 3 Credits

Analysis of poetry relevant to discussions in contemporary poetry studies. Topics and poets covered will vary from semester to semester. Can repeat up to 6 credit hours with different topics. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Summit. Prer., ENGL 1310, ENGL 3000.

  • 3 Credits

Study of major works in prose, poetry, and drama of medieval Europe. May be repeated for credit with permission of the department chair. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2010, and ENGL 3000. Meets with ENGL 5500.

  • 3 Credits

An advanced seminar in literary theory. Course is organized around a theoretical topic and emphasizes theory’s role in the interpretation of literary texts. Course topics vary by semester. May be repeated once with permission of department chair. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Summit. Prer., ENGL 1310, ENGL 1410, ENGL 2010, ENGL 3000. Meets with ENGL 5700.

  • 3 Credits

Study of Writing Center theory and practice. Students will participate in weekly observations and consultations in the Writing Center. Students in all majors are encouraged to enroll. Required for employment as a Writing Consultant at the Writing Center. Prer., ENGL 1310; and ENGL 1410 or ENGL 2080 or ENGL 2090 or INOV 2100 or their equivalents. Meets with ENGL 5800.

  • 3 Credits

In-depth inquiry into theoretical topics in the teaching of writing in the public schools, with practical applications via the production of a theory-into-practice portfolio suitable to the topic. Topics vary. Prer., ENGL 3010. Meets with ENGL 5810.

  • 3 Credits

Introduces the theories, practices, and cultural power of rhetoric in ancient Greece and Rome. Also includes the debates surrounding the relevance of classical rhetoric to the teaching of writing today. Prer., ENGL 3010, ENGL 3110, and senior standing, or instructor permission. Meets with ENGL 5820.

  • 3 Credits

Theoretical and practical study of writing processes across diverse contexts. Explores the rhetorical nature of writing, and applies rhetorical theory and research to the teaching and practice of writing. Consult Course Search on the UCCS website or the MyUCCS Portal for the topic in any given semester. Prer., Upper-division standing or permission of instructor, and ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1410 or course equivalents. Meets with ENGL 5830.

  • 3 Credits

Training practicum for writing instructors at the college level. Theoretical inquiry and practical development of syllabi, course plans, and instructional materials. May be taken for a grade or Pass/Fail. Meets with ENGL 5840.

  • 3 Credits

Outline of the history of the English language including a brief survey of sound changes, of grammatical forms and of the vocabulary. Meets with ENGL 5850.

  • 3 Credits

Advanced, in-depth study of the theoretical and practical accomplishments of writers and rhetors across diverse historical contexts. Rhetors, theorists, and historical contexts shift with topics. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive. Prer., ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1410 or equivalent courses. Meets with ENGL 5860.

  • 3 Credits

Advanced, in-depth study of the rhetoric of a particular public issue. Issues, theoretical materials, historical moment, and readings shift with topic. May be taken two times as long as topics are different. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Summit; Writing Intensive. Prer., ENGL 1310, ENGL 1410. Meets with ENGL 5880.

  • 3 Credits

Course topic will vary by semester. Consult Course Search on the UCCS website or the MyUCCS Portal for specific course content. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Summit. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2010, and ENGL 3000. Meets with ENGL 5950.

  • 3 Credits

This literature seminar examines one aspect of William Shakespeare’s oeuvre deeply. It looks at the many facets of one work, one theme, or one character type, through the lenses of not only the playwright’s own plays, but also the contributions of his contemporaries and the larger cultural history. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Summit; Writing Intensive. Prer., ENGL 2010, and ENGL 3000. Meets with ENGL 5970.

  • 3 Credits

This course considers Shakespeare through the lenses of ecocriticism and ecofeminist theory. In doing so, not only does it enliven the natural world vocabulary more familiar to an audience more intimate with that world, it also considers the roles of economic inequality, gender norms, and racial categories in determining one’s relationship to that world. Prer., ENGL 2010, ENGL 3000. Meets with ENGL 5973.

  • 3 Credits

Author varies from semester to semester and may not be offered in any given year. Consult Course Search on the UCCS website or the MyUCCS Portal for specific information. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Prer., ENGL 1310 or validated equivalent, ENGL 2010, and ENGL 3000. Meets with ENGL 5980.

  • 3 Credits