Copyright Education Initiative

Kraemer Copyright Conference

June 6-7, 2016 | University of Colorado Colorado Springs

Session Information

Monday Morning Preconferences

Donna Ferullo

Preconference Session I: Copyright Boot Camp
Time: 9am - Noon
Room: University Center Room 302
Presenter: Donna Ferullo
Description: This session will provide participants with an introduction to U.S. Copyright Law and focus on the legal exemptions that specifically impact libraries and academia, including 17 U.S.C. § 107, 17 U.S.C. § 108, and 17 U.S.C. § 109.
Bio: Donna L. Ferullo is a Professor and Director of the University Copyright Office at Purdue University. She advises the University on copyright compliance issues and is responsible for educating the University community on their rights and responsibilities under the copyright law. She holds a Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from Suffolk University Law School and a Masters of Library Science degree from the University of Maryland. Ms. Ferullo is a member of the Massachusetts Bar, Indiana Bar and the United States Supreme Court Bar. She recently published book is entitled Managing Copyright in Higher Education.

Kyle Seigal Rachel Nichols

Preconference Session II: Real-Life Examples of Common Copyright Missteps
Time: 9am-11am
Room: University Center Room 303
Presenters: Kyle N. Siegal and Rachel Nicholas
Description: The session will cover real-life examples supported by case law and offer tips for avoiding such missteps .

Bios: Kyle Seigal is an enthusiastic, business-minded associate in Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie's Intellectual Property group. As a registered patent attorney with an engineering background, Kyle is passionate about protecting innovation in technology, art, and design. He helps clients identify, secure, and enforce all types of intellectual property rights, including those rooted in patents, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets, and rights of publicity. Kyle particularly enjoys helping clients generate and maintain competitive advantages by strategically expanding patent portfolios and resolving patent disputes. In addition to patent prosecution and patent litigation, his practice also encompasses trademark prosecution, pre-litigation enforcement matters, licensing arrangements, and trademark, copyright, and right of publicity clearance work. His experience spans a variety of fields, including those related to medical devices, pharmaceuticals, biologics, computer software and hardware, networking technologies, wearables, athletic products, mechanical devices, fuel cells, firearms, mixed-media products, and furniture, lighting, and other consumer goods. Rachel Nicholas is an associate in Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie's Intellectual Property practice group. She focuses her practice on copyright and trademark law for clients in a variety of industries including fashion, apparel, and sports/recreation. Rachel’s experience includes assisting with contractual matters, drafting memoranda, and working on licensing agreements. Before joining Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie, Ms. Nicholas worked as a legal intern for Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

Monday Afternoon Sessions

Kevin Smith

Conference Session I: Libraries & Copyright: the Past and Present
Room: Berger Hall (University Center)
Presenter: Kevin Smith
Description: This session will look at the history of U.S. Copyright law and how that history impacts the current issue and trends that libraries face today.
Bio: Kevin Smith became the Dean of Libraries at the University of Kansas in May 2016, after 10 years as Director of Copyright and Scholarly Communications at the Duke University Libraries.  As both a librarian and a lawyer specializing in intellectual property issues, Smith's role at Duke was to advise faculty, staff, and students about the impact of copyright, licensing, and the changing nature of scholarly publishing on higher education.  Prior to that, Smith was director of the Pilgrim Library at Defiance College in Ohio, where he also taught constitutional law.  His teaching experience is various, having taught courses in theology, law, and library science.  Smith is the author of numerous articles on the impact of copyright law and the internet on scholarly research as well as libraries' role in the academy.  He has been a highly regarded blogger on these issues for many years, and in 2013 published Owning and Using Scholarship: An IP Handbook for Teachers and Researchers with the Association of College and Research Libraries. Smith holds a B.A. from Hamilton College in Clinton, N.Y., an M.A. from Yale Divinity School, an M.L.S. from Kent State University, and a J.D. from Capital University.  He did doctoral work in theology and literature at the University of Chicago. Smith has been admitted to the bar in Ohio and North Carolina.

Kenneth D. Crews

Conference Session II: Libraries & Copyright: the Future
Room: Berger Hall (University Center)
Presenter: Kenneth D. Crews
Description: Will the future of copyright include libraries? Contemplations on the near and distant future of copyright law and how libraries can find a changing role.
Bio: Kenneth D. Crews is an attorney, author, professor, and international copyright consultant. For more than 25 years, his research, policymaking, and teaching have centered on copyright issues of importance to education and research. Professor Crews established and directed the nation's first university-based copyright office at Indiana University. He established a similar office at Columbia University in New York City, and he currently serves on the faculty of Columbia Law School. He recently returned to Los Angeles and has a law practice and consultancy based in Century City. Dr. Crews earned M.L.S. and Ph.D. degrees from UCLA's School of Library and Information Science. He was the first recipient of the Patterson Copyright Award from the American Library Association, and he received the Mark T. Banner Award from the American Bar Association in 2014. He is the author of numerous publications including the book, Copyright Law for Librarians and Educators (3rd ed, 2012).

Carrie Russell Donna Ferullo Sarah McCleskey

Panel Discussion: Copyright & Libraries--Looking Forward
Room: Berger Hall (University Center)
Presenters: Carrie Russell, Donna Ferullo & Sarah McCleskey. Moderated by Tucker Taylor
Description: Panelists will provide commentary on the Conference I & II Sessions as well as discuss their own perspective on important copyright issues of the future.
Bios: Carrie Russell is the Director for the Program on Public Access to Information for the American Library Association's Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP). She has worked for OITP since 1999, where she expanded into the areas of international copyright, accessibility, and e-books. Carrie was the recipient of the 2001 ALA Staff Achievement Award, and the 2013 ABC-CLIO/Greenwood Award for Best Book in Library Literature for Copyright: An Everyday Guide for K-12 Librarians and Educators. She also authored Complete Copyright: An Everyday Guide for Librarians, now in its second edition. Carrie has a Masters in Library and Information Science (MLIS) from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and a Master of Arts (media arts with an emphasis on the political economy of information) from the University of Arizona.  Donna L. Ferullo is a Professor and Director of the University Copyright Office at Purdue University. She advises the University on copyright compliance issues and is responsible for educating the University community on their rights and responsibilities under the copyright law. She holds a Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from Suffolk University Law School and a Masters of Library Science degree from the University of Maryland. Ms. Ferullo is a member of the Massachusetts Bar, Indiana Bar and the United States Supreme Court Bar. She recently published book is entitled Managing Copyright in Higher Education. Tucker Taylor is Head of Circulation at Thomas Cooper Library. Having served over 25 years in library access services, she is keenly interested in how copyright and licensing affect our abilities to provide access to information. She is a founder and co-editor in chief of the Journal of Copyright in Education and Librarianship. She is also a founder and co-chair of SCLA's Scholarly Communications Interest Group, a member of the University of South Carolina Libraries' Scholarly Communications team, and regularly presents on copyright, predatory publishing and open access issues. Head of Access Services at Hofstra University since 2004, Sarah McCleskey manages circulation, e-reserve, copyright, ILL, stacks, periodicals, and the Film and Media Library. She is currently board chair of the National Media Market (www.nmm.net) and invites anyone interested in educational video to ask her about the upcoming conference in October. While completing a master’s degree in Classical Archaeology at UNC-Chapel Hill, Sarah worked in the Rare Book Collection as a grad assistant. She later worked in the Music Library at UNC, while pursuing her MLS. Subsequently, Sarah was head of the architecture library at Clemson University. Sarah lives in Astoria (Queens); when she is not geeking out on library stuff, she enjoys visiting breweries and distilleries to taste craft beer and small batch bourbon.

Poster Presentations (presented during the conference reception)

Jane Monson Wendy Highby

Poster: Creating a Faculty Copyright Guide for Streaming Media
Room: Library 3rd Floor Apse
Presenters: Jane Monson & Wendy Highby
Description: In many academic institutions, streaming media is becoming the preferred format for delivery of audiovisual instructional materials. The University of Northern Colorado (UNC) recently licensed a streaming media server, “Ensemble,” enabling faculty to request the upload of streaming audiovisual materials for on-campus and distance courses. In order to promote copyright compliance, the UNC Libraries was asked to create a document to guide faculty members in ensuring that all streaming materials are lawfully obtained and that copyright law is followed. An FAQ was drafted to provide faculty with understandable, accessible guidelines. The document outlines a 6-step protocol that faculty can use to determine whether their media may be legally streamed via the university’s course management system. Topics include working with the library to purchase streaming licenses, requesting permission from copyright holders, following the TEACH Act, and making a fair use argument. Advice for certain scenarios is also supplied, such as dealing with encrypted media and reformatting older media types for streaming. The poster will outline the information that is included in the copyright guide, briefly discuss the process of creating the guide, and provide advice for librarians who may wish to provide a similar service for instructors at their institutions.
Bios: Jane Monson received her MLS from the University of Iowa in 2009 and has been Digital Initiatives Librarian at the University of Northern Colorado since 2012. Prior to that she was Digital Projects Librarian at Truman State University. She has edited a LITA guide on digital librarianship and is currently writing a guide to creating digital collections, to be published by ALA Publishing. Wendy Highby was a paralegal for a decade prior to receiving her M.L.S. from Emporia State University in 1993. She has worked at Michener Library at the University of Northern Colorado since 2002, first as head of Serials and Acquisitions, and subsequently as Social Sciences Reference Librarian.

Stephanie Towery

Poster: Workflow for an Institutional Repository
Room: Library 3rd Floor Apse
Presenter: Stephanie Towery
Description: This poster will show a workflow for an Institutional Repository based on work we’ve done at Texas State University Alkek Library to develop a workflow for our institutional repository, Digital Collections.
Bio: Stephanie Towery is the Copyright Office at Texas State University, a post she’s held since February 2015. Stephanie is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Texas, where she teaches Legal Information Resources to library and law students. She worked as a law librarian for Haynes and Boone, LLP for many years. Stephanie has a law degree, a library degree, and is licensed to practice law in Texas.

Juleah Swanson

Poster: Paying for Open: Open Access Subvention Funds at the University of Colorado Boulder Libraries
Room: Library 3rd Floor Apse
Presenter: Juleah Swanson & Jennifer Chan
Description: The University of Colorado Boulder Libraries, a prominent advocate for Open Access within the CU System and nationally, has been supporting CU Boulder faculty, students, and staff since 2012 in the payment of author and/or article processing fees (APCs) to support publication of CU research in gold open access journals. Nationally, when academic libraries chose to support Open Access publication costs, it is often an effort to contribute to publication models that allow for worldwide, freely available access to research. This poster will explore and analyze data collected from the University of Colorado Boulder Libraries’ Open Access Fund from 2012 to present, illustrating the disciplines that have participated, venues of publication, as well as begin to explore the implications of the cost of this program over time. This poster will also look at data from the University of Colorado Boulder Libraries as compared to national trends and data, beginning to illustrate the role of Open Access subvention funds within the greater context of the OA movement within academia.
Bios: Juleah Swanson  is Head of Acquisitions Services and an Assistant Professor at the University of Colorado Boulder Libraries. Jennifer Chan is Assistant Professor and Scholarly Communications Librarian at the University of Colorado Boulder, where she heads several Open Access initiatives of the University Libraries, including advocating for a campus-level OA policy, administering the Libraries' OA policy, an OA publishing fund, and CU Scholar, the institutional repository of the University of Colorado Boulder.

Marcia Keyser

Poster: The Google Books Case Settlements: Gone But Not Forgotten
Room: Library 3rd Floor Apse
Presenter: Marcia Keyser
Description: What is the Book Rights Registry? How do you sell an unauthorized e-book? Why would a library receive a dedicated terminal? Two Settlements were proposed during the negotiations of Authors Guild v. Google. They were cooperatively developed by the litigants from the case, and they intended to settle the accusation of copyright infringement by Google in its Google Books Search program. The settlements went far beyond that question, and proposed many potentially worthwhile - or at least interesting - projects. The Settlements themselves are dead, and rightfully so, but they provide some ideas mulling over.
Bio: Marcia Keyser has Master’s Degrees in English and in Library Science. After completing her Library Science degree she took her first position at the Texas A&M University in Kingsville, where she worked for eight years. After moving to her current position with Drake University in Des Moines, IA, she became motivated to study copyright issues, starting with E-reserves and expanding to all areas of academic and some public uses of copyrighted materials. During her 14 years of study she has read books, journal articles, and web-based materials; written a textbook; audited a law school class on copyright; taught an undergraduate class titled “Copyright Issues in the U.S.” (7 times!) and been invited to give three conference presentations.

Kelly Visnak Ramona Holmes

Poster: Campus Partnerships and Publishing ETDs: The Libraries and a Decentralized Graduate School Model
Room: Library 3rd Floor Apse
Presenter: Kelly Visnak (Coauthor: Ramona Holmes)
Description: The practice of article-based dissertations are becoming more common in higher education. This comes at a time when a changing scholarly publishing landscape brings about unprecedented concerns regarding student authors, their rights, and how to manage copyright issues and the archiving of ETDs. This poster tells of one library’s experience with the decentralization of a Graduate School and the evolving publishing model for Electronic Theses and Dissertations. What began as a format review, with a centralized mechanical check overseen by the library, has continued to evolve. At the University of Texas at Arlington, the Libraries are providing faculty and graduate students with a range of services that include author agreement contract support, addendum and negotiation tools, embargo requests options (typically related to sponsored research), and the practice of copyright compliance. Encouraging cross campus communication and partnerships in order to archive today’s ETDs.
Bios: Kelly Visnak is Associate University Librarian for University of Texas at Arlington Libraries where she is leading the Division of Scholarly Communications. Previously, she served as a Scholarly Communications Librarian for the University of Wyoming, the Colorado Director for Emporia State University’s master of library science program, and an LIS adjunct professor. Her doctorate in Library and Information Science is from Dominican University in Chicago. She has had the opportunity to serve as co-author on two books with Dr. Robert J. Grover, lead author. Libraries Partnering with Self-Publishing: A Winning Combination (Oct, 2016) and Evolving Global Information Infrastructure and Information Transfer (March, 2015). Ramona Holmes currently serves as the Dept. Head for Digital Creation at the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. With a background in cataloging, metadata creation and digital imaging, Ms. Holmes implemented UTA's institutional repository in 2007, and continues to provide oversight to this repository. From 2001-2013 she served as the Coordinator for Metadata Services, until accepting her current position. Ms. Holmes received her M.S. from the University of North Texas, School of Library and Information Science in 1999 after earning a B.A. in English from the University of Texas at Arlington in 1997. She has 28 years of library experience at both the paraprofessional and professional level.

deg farrelly

Poster: Applying Section 108 to Preserve VHS Collections
Room: Library 3rd Floor Apse
Presenter: deg farrelly
Description: With the introduction of the VHS format, libraries built collections of VHS tapes to support teaching methods adapted to the easy availability and affordability of video. Following introduction of the DVD format, those VHS collections sit largely unused and mostly ignored. Much of their content has not been rereleased on DVD or streaming and is at risk of being lost as VHS player availability declines into obscurity. Section 108 of the U.S. Copyright law permits reformatting and preservation for local use by the holding institution of out-of-release videotapes. The law requires, however, due diligence searching nto the distribution status of each title. This effort is immensely time-consuming; many libraries will not have the resources to undertake such projects and thus may inadvertently allow their VHS collections to molder away. The media librarians at American University, Arizona State University, and William Paterson University are collaborating on this issue. Their first step is the creation of an online database of out-of-distribution VHS titles in their own collections. This database logs the searches conducted for each title and is accessible at section108video.com. The goal of the collaborators is to provide a resource that other librarians can refer to when planning their own VHS digitization projects. Eventually the database will be opened for contributions from interested collection managers at other institutions. Information collected by these primary investigators may serve as the foundation for a coordinated digitization effort.
Bio: deg farrelly is the media librarian at Arizona State University Libraries. With 40 years experience as a media librarian deg farrelly provides a unique perspective on video in academic libraries. He is the author of “Streaming Video” in the book Rethinking Collection Development and Management, and co-investigator in 2013 and 2015 national surveys of academic library streaming video. deg presents frequently on matters of academic video at national conferences such as ALA, Charleston Conference, and the National Media Market. He has played instrumental roles in the development of subscription, PDA, and EBA streaming video acquisition models, and serves as a consultant for several video distributors and publishers. His current focus is due diligence in the application of US Copyright Section 108 for preserving VHS collections.

Tuesday Morning Sessions

Kenneth D. Crews Kevin Smith

Conference Session III: Copyright in Action: Practical Advice on Addressing Copyright Issues at Your Institution
Room: Berger Hall (University Center)
Presenters: Kenneth D. Crews and Kevin Smith
Description: Session presenters will provide information on best practices in addressing copyright issues at libraries and academic institutions.
Bios: Kenneth D. Crews is an attorney, author, professor, and international copyright consultant. For more than 25 years, his research, policymaking, and teaching have centered on copyright issues of importance to education and research. Professor Crews established and directed the nation's first university-based copyright office at Indiana University. He established a similar office at Columbia University in New York City, and he currently serves on the faculty of Columbia Law School. He recently returned to Los Angeles and has a law practice and consultancy based in Century City. Dr. Crews earned M.L.S. and Ph.D. degrees from UCLA's School of Library and Information Science. He was the first recipient of the Patterson Copyright Award from the American Library Association, and he received the Mark T. Banner Award from the American Bar Association in 2014. He is the author of numerous publications including the book, Copyright Law for Librarians and Educators (3rd ed, 2012). Kevin Smith became the Dean of Libraries at the University of Kansas in May 2016, after 10 years as Director of Copyright and Scholarly Communications at the Duke University Libraries.  As both a librarian and a lawyer specializing in intellectual property issues, Smith's role at Duke was to advise faculty, staff, and students about the impact of copyright, licensing, and the changing nature of scholarly publishing on higher education.  Prior to that, Smith was director of the Pilgrim Library at Defiance College in Ohio, where he also taught constitutional law.  His teaching experience is various, having taught courses in theology, law, and library science.  Smith is the author of numerous articles on the impact of copyright law and the internet on scholarly research as well as libraries' role in the academy.  He has been a highly regarded blogger on these issues for many years, and in 2013 published Owning and Using Scholarship: An IP Handbook for Teachers and Researchers with the Association of College and Research Libraries. Smith holds a B.A. from Hamilton College in Clinton, N.Y., an M.A. from Yale Divinity School, an M.L.S. from Kent State University, and a J.D. from Capital University.  He did doctoral work in theology and literature at the University of Chicago. Smith has been admitted to the bar in Ohio and North Carolina.

Break-out Sessions: Block 1

Kevin Smith

The Past, Present and Future of Mass Digitization Projects in Libraries
Room: Berger Hall (University Center)
Presenters: Kevin Smith
Description: Thinking about the past, present and future of copyright law can give us a great deal of insight into the current situation that confronts libraries as they undertake mass digitization projects.  Some of our most intractable problems were created by developments in the law over the course of the 20th century.  And recent court cases have suggested some opportunities as well.  We will discuss these developments to uncover practical strategies for assess and implementing library mass digitization projects.
Bio: Kevin Smith became the Dean of Libraries at the University of Kansas in May 2016, after 10 years as Director of Copyright and Scholarly Communications at the Duke University Libraries.  As both a librarian and a lawyer specializing in intellectual property issues, Smith's role at Duke was to advise faculty, staff, and students about the impact of copyright, licensing, and the changing nature of scholarly publishing on higher education.  Prior to that, Smith was director of the Pilgrim Library at Defiance College in Ohio, where he also taught constitutional law.  His teaching experience is various, having taught courses in theology, law, and library science.  Smith is the author of numerous articles on the impact of copyright law and the internet on scholarly research as well as libraries' role in the academy.  He has been a highly regarded blogger on these issues for many years, and in 2013 published Owning and Using Scholarship: An IP Handbook for Teachers and Researchers with the Association of College and Research Libraries. Smith holds a B.A. from Hamilton College in Clinton, N.Y., an M.A. from Yale Divinity School, an M.L.S. from Kent State University, and a J.D. from Capital University.  He did doctoral work in theology and literature at the University of Chicago. Smith has been admitted to the bar in Ohio and North Carolina.

Micah Zeller

Legal Issues When Instructors Require Online Distribution of Student Work

Legal Issues When Instructors Require Online Distribution of Student Work (checklist)
Room: University Center Room 303
Presenter: Micah Zeller
Description: Instructors may require, as a condition of course credit, that students make works they have created available to the public outside of the classroom. Libraries provide platforms and subject specialists, and so are well-positioned to help. In this session participants will discuss IP law, privacy, and related legal issues such involvement brings--with an eye to student rights and what we can and can't do.
Bio: Micah Zeller is the Copyright & Digital Access Librarian at Washington University in St. Louis, where he advises faculty, students, and staff on intellectual property issues that connect to research, teaching, and library services. He is a member of the Missouri Bar, and serves on the Faculty Committee on Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer under the Office of the Provost. He has a JD from Washington University School of Law, where he oversaw creation of its institutional repository, and has worked for University Libraries since 2013.

 Cindy Villanueva

The Year in Review in Copyright Law
Room: University Center Room 307
Presenters: Cindy Villanueva
Description: The session will cover the major copyright cases decided in the past year.
Bio: Cindy Villanueva is an associate in Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie’s Intellectual Property Practice Group. Her IP practice primarily focuses on trademarks, copyrights, and rights of publicity. Cindy assists clients with trademark selection, clearance, registration and prosecution in the United States and abroad. Her services often involve helping clients implement trademark enforcement programs to strengthen and protect their brands from possible infringers. She also negotiates and drafts license agreements and other contracts involving copyrights, trademarks, rights of publicity, and other intellectual property. Ms. Villanueva helps clients with cases involving trademark infringement and dilution, copyright infringement, trade secret misappropriation, unfair competition and cybersquatting. She has prosecuted and defended clients in intellectual property litigation before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board and federal courts.

Copyright and Electronic Reserves
Room: University Center 122
Presenter: Tucker Taylor
Description: When can we use copyrighted materials in our electronic reserves systems? In this session, you will learn your rights and responsibilities under federal copyright law. In addition to discussing how to appropriately apply the Fair Use exception, we’ll also cover the Georgia State University lawsuit on this very issue. Participants will also learn how to better educate faculty and students about their use of copyrighted materials in teaching.
Bio: Tucker Taylor is Head of Circulation at Thomas Cooper Library. Having served over 25 years in library access services, she is keenly interested in how copyright and licensing affect our abilities to provide access to information. She is a founder and co-editor in chief of the Journal of Copyright in Education and Librarianship. She is also a founder and co-chair of SCLA's Scholarly Communications Interest Group, a member of the University of South Carolina Libraries’ Scholarly Communications team, and regularly presents on copyright, predatory publishing and open access issues.

Donna Ferullo
Copyright Librarian: Past, Present and Future

Room: University Center Room 309
Presenter: Donna Ferullo
Description: The role of copyright librarian has changed dramatically over the years. This session will discuss the evolving need of copyright expertise in libraries. It will address the types of typical questions that a copyright librarian addresses on any given day. This session will identify potential future trends in the world of copyright and also specifically copyright and librarians.
Bio: Donna L. Ferullo is a Professor and Director of the University Copyright Office at Purdue University. She advises the University on copyright compliance issues and is responsible for educating the University community on their rights and responsibilities under the copyright law. She holds a Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from Suffolk University Law School and a Masters of Library Science degree from the University of Maryland. Ms. Ferullo is a member of the Massachusetts Bar, Indiana Bar and the United States Supreme Court Bar. She recently published book is entitled Managing Copyright in Higher Education.

Karey Patterson
Navigating the Challenges of Copyright and Materials Management in the Era of Digital Distribution

Room: University Center 124
Presenter: Karey Patterson
Description: This session outlines recent changes in higher education sector in the management and distribution of copyright material. Pressure across the education sector for gains in efficiency has caused a shift in the responsibility for copyright materials management from library copyright staff directly to professors and teachers. This presents risks in that copyright awareness and compliance are rarely concerns for academics who prefer to focus on teaching. In this session we look at methods to assist in the management of contemporary copyright materials issues and obligations to improve copyright management processes, reduce risk and costs while improving outcomes for all stakeholders.
Bio: I have gained a lot of experience and insight from working on hundreds of digital strategy, online businesses, software development and new media projects over 20 years. I combine my research experience with knowledge of real world practical implementation and have worked around the globe with diverse organizations. My extensive expertise in developing new digital solutions, software development, copyright and system integration has given me experience of key issues from a variety of sectors including the music and entertainment, finance and banking and especially higher education. Over the years I have been instrumental in the organisational restructuring, and process improvement of several organizations (around the globe), assisting in the development of more productive and successful work environments through the effective use of technology and by leveraging technology to increase efficiency, reduce risk and legal exposure. I hold B. Bus (Hons) and MEd (T&D) degrees and have published refereed articles on the impact of web technology on human interaction and have undertaken advanced research into usability, human interface design and navigational systems with particular reference to the education sector. I like to work on innovative, globally important and exciting projects that make a difference. Educational librarians and teachers require fast, accurate and efficient processes for copyright study materials management and reporting. Helping make copyright easy is a rewarding challenge!

Tammy Ravas

Reflections on Teaching an Online Undergraduate Copyright Course (Contributed Paper)
Room: University Center Room 302
Presenter: Tammy Ravas
Description: The presenter will share her experiences developing and teaching a fully online course, Who Owns Culture: An Introduction to Copyright during the fall semester of 2015 at The University of Montana. The course was open to all undergraduates, introduced students to the basics of copyright and how it has continued to affect culture over time. She will share assessment strategies showing how students’ attitudes and perceptions changed over the course.
Bio: Tammy Ravas is Associate Professor and the Visual and Performing Arts Librarian at the University of Montana's Mansfield Library. She received her Bachelor of Music in Music Education from SUNY Potsdam, an MLS from SUNY at Buffalo, and a Master of Arts in Music History from SUNY at Buffalo. She has had an interest in copyright law since her days in graduate school, and received Level 1 Certification in Copyright Management and Leadership from the (now defunct) Center for Intellectual Property at the University of Maryland. Currently, she is chair of the Music Library Association’s Legislation Committee and serves as chair-elect on the American Library Association’s OITP subcommittee on copyright education. Lastly, Tammy has presented at conferences and has held workshops on copyright and higher education both nationally and internationally.

Will Cross

More than a House of Cards: Developing a Firm Foundation for Streaming Media and Consumer-Licensed Content in the Library (Contributed Paper)
Room: University Center Room 302
Presenter: William Cross
Description: Just as librarians are finding their footing in an environment where licensed content is replacing circulation based on first sale, a new set of challenges are destabilizing library practice. Consumer-licensed services for streaming films, shows, and games like Netflix and Steam are the best - and often only - way to share media, but consumer-licensing challenges our ability to rely on copyright exceptions like Sec 108 and 110 or to engage in arms-length negotiation. Can we develop practices that reflect our values and serve our patrons, or will we lose our multimedia collections among the shifting sands of consumer-licensing?
Bio: William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides guidance to campus stakeholders on legal issues, open access to scholarship, data, and education, and related topics. As a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Will earned an M.A. in Technology & Communication, a J.D. in Law, and an M.S.L.S. in Library Science. Before joining the NCSU Libraries, Will worked in academic and law libraries, in constitutional litigation, and at the North Carolina Court of Appeals. He serves as an instructor in the UNC School of Information & Library Science and lectures nationally on copyright, free expression, and open culture. Will has been quoted in publications such as The Chronicle of Higher Education, Library Journal, and Techdirt and publishes regularly on topics ranging from the pedagogy of legal education for librarians to the First Amendment status of video games.

Lilian Hoffecker Heidi zuniga

Managing an Open Access Fund: Tips from the Trenches (Contributed Paper)
Room: University Center Room 302
Presenter: Lilian Hoffecker and Heidi Zuniga
Description:The presenters will share the Health Sciences Library's experiences coordinating an open access fund at the Anschutz Medical Campus of the University of Colorado
Bios: Lilian Takahashi Hoffecker is a research librarian at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Library. She has been involved with scholarly communication almost a decade and currently coordinates the campus open access fund. Prior to librarianship, she was a researcher and educator in physical anthropology which gave her a general appreciation for the many ways scholars exchange research information. Heidi Zuniga is the digital resources librarian and senior instructor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. She directs the Health Science Library’s digital repository, manages access for electronic resources, and serves on the editorial board for a library journal. Ms. Zuniga assists with the coordination of an author fund for open access journals and is currently working on strategies for responding to data-sharing mandates. As a result of this work, Ms. Zuniga became interested in the mechanisms that enable open access and in the positive and negative impacts of open access on scholarly communication.

Brett Currier

Copyright and Digitization and Perseveration of State Government Documents: A Detailed Analysis (Contributed Paper)
Room: University Center 302
Presenter: Brett Currier
Description:This paper will build off "Copyright and the Digitization of State Government Documents: A Preliminary Analysis" presented at IPres 2015. In this paper, we will present a more detailed analysis and a practical framework for local archivists and librarians to use in assessing copyright status, the application of fair use, and use of other copyright limitations to different types of government documents.
Bio: Brett Currier is the Director of Scholarly Communications at the University of Texas at Arlington. He graduated from the University of North Carolina with a Master of Science in Library Science and a law degree. He has published and presented on copyright and other legal issues in libraries and developing Memorandums of Understanding for library projects.

Break-out Sessions: Block 2

Kenneth Crews

Copyright, Libraries, and the Ethics Imperative
Room: Berger Hall (University Center)
Presenter: Kenneth D. Crews
Description: Ethics pose a significant and sensitive challenge for the copyright advisor or information officer in the library. The ethical quandaries might of the human variety -- the habits we bring to work each day and the way we deal with our colleagues in an honest and responsible manner. Ethics are also of the legal sort. States regulate the licensing of lawyers and the practice of law. The copyright officer may have the principal duty to educate the community and empower faculty, students, librarians, and others to make wise and informed decisions. Yet we can easily imagine how that private meeting to share information could migrate into a consultation imbued with detailed guidance and recommendations about copyright decisions. This session will explore possible options for defining the duties and role of the copyright officer in the library, in the academic institution, or elsewhere. When should the officer be most comfortable sharing legal information? When should questions be referred to counsel? When do you simply need to wrap up the conversation in a helpful and diplomatic manner? Knowing your limits can also help you fulfill the core requirements of your copyright job.
Bio: Kenneth D. Crews is an attorney, author, professor, and international copyright consultant. For more than 25 years, his research, policymaking, and teaching have centered on copyright issues of importance to education and research. Professor Crews established and directed the nation's first university-based copyright office at Indiana University. He established a similar office at Columbia University in New York City, and he currently serves on the faculty of Columbia Law School. He recently returned to Los Angeles and has a law practice and consultancy based in Century City. Dr. Crews earned M.L.S. and Ph.D. degrees from UCLA's School of Library and Information Science. He was the first recipient of the Patterson Copyright Award from the American Library Association, and he received the Mark T. Banner Award from the American Bar Association in 2014. He is the author of numerous publications including the book, Copyright Law for Librarians and Educators (3rd ed, 2012).

Sue Kunda

Teaching (and Learning) About Copyright Can Be Fun
Room: University Center 303
Presenter: Sue Kunda
Description: Are you looking for ways to spice up your copyright education and move beyond the typical PowerPoint presentation? Would you like to learn more about copyright in a fun, interactive environment? Then this is the session for you! We'll use a variety of active learning techniques you can incorporate into any instruction session to make it more fun and engaging for participants. Be prepared to get up and move around, interact with other attendees and maybe even share a laugh or two. Yes, copyright CAN be fun.
Bio: Sue received a BS in Elementary Education and an endorsement in Library Science from Montana State University. After teaching and acting as a school librarian for multiple school districts in the western United States, she returned to school and received an MLS from Emporia State University. She now works at Western Oregon University where I'm the Scholarly Communications and Social Science Librarian.

Emily Bayton

Fair Use and Online Educational Materials
Room: University Center 307
Presenter: Emily Bayton
Description: This session will cover how the concept of fair use is applied when using third-party copyrighted materials in online education.
Bio: Emily Bayton is a partner and Co-Practice Group Leader of Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie’s Intellectual Property practice group. Emily has considerable experience in many areas of intellectual property law including copyright, trade secrets, and rights of privacy and publicity. Her clients come from a variety of industries including consumer goods and services, education, sports and many others. Providing comprehensive trademark counsel, Emily assists clients with trademark selection, clearance, registration and prosecution. She analyzes her clients’ trademark portfolios to ensure they have appropriate worldwide coverage and recommends strategies for strengthening their brand presence in the marketplace. Her services often involve helping clients implement trademark enforcement programs to strengthen and protect their brands from possible infringers. She also represents clients before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (TTAB) and has experience with Accelerated Case Resolution (ACR) tracks through the TTAB; as such, she often advises her clients on the strategic merits of using the ACR approach. A frequent author and speaker, Emily’s articles related to IP issues have appeared in a wide range of media including Sports Business Journal, Law360.com, and Sports Litigation Alert.

Sarah McCleskey

Copyright and Video Content in Libraries
Room: University Center 309
Presenter: Sarah McCleskey
Description:What happens to circulating VHS collections when the VHS tape dies? Physical degradation of the media housing valuable, unique, and out–of–print video material is a common problem in libraries. This session will provide guidance for converting VHS content to digital while adhering to U.S. copyright law.
Bio: Head of Access Services at Hofstra University since 2004, Sarah McCleskey manages circulation, e-reserve, copyright, ILL, stacks, periodicals, and the Film and Media Library. She is currently board chair of the National Media Market (www.nmm.net) and invites anyone interested in educational video to ask her about the upcoming conference in October. While completing a master’s degree in Classical Archaeology at UNC-Chapel Hill, Sarah worked in the Rare Book Collection as a grad assistant. She later worked in the Music Library at UNC, while pursuing her MLS. Subsequently, Sarah was head of the architecture library at Clemson University. Sarah lives in Astoria (Queens); when she is not geeking out on library stuff, she enjoys visiting breweries and distilleries to taste craft beer and small batch bourbon.

Cristela Garcia-SpitzJoohee Lee

Rights & Permissions in Real Life, the UCSD Experience
Room: University Center 122
Presenter: Cristela Garcia-Spitz and Joohee Lee
Description:The UC San Diego Library is in the process of digitizing approximately 300 audio recordings from the Paul Blackburn Collection, which consists of readings from over 200 poets. This session will take a look at the risk assessment, rights and permissions process, and the reason the Library decided to take a risk-averse approach to this project in order to make parts of this collection available online through its Digital Collections website. The second part of the session will review the work the Library’s Copyright Policies Task Force has undertaken to incorporate Creative Commons licenses to its collections.
Bios: Cristela Garcia-Spitz is the Project Manager in the Digital Library Development Program at the University of California, San Diego. While working on digital projects, she encounters a variety of rights and permissions issues.  To mitigate this, she worked to incorporate a checklist for determining copyright status and access options into the project proposal process.  She also assisted in streamlining the rights and access metadata stored in the Library's digital repository. Before coming to the UC San Diego Library, Cristela was the EAD Conversion Project Manager at the Mudd Manuscript Library at Princeton University.  She earned her MLIS at the University of Pittsburgh. Joohee Lee started her rights & permissions career in college textbook publishing in 1999. She has since held various positions in rights and permissions and licensing at Antenna Audio, YouTube, Discovery, and now UC San Diego Library.

Carrie Russell

Conference Session IV: Copyright Law & Policy: Advocating for Libraries
Room: Berger Hall (University Center)
Presenter: Carrie Russell
Description: This session will explore the efforts of the American Library Association (ALA) in advocating Congress for libraries and their patrons on relevant Copyright Issues.
Bio: Carrie Russell is the Director for the Program on Public Access to Information for the American Library Association's Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP). She has worked for OITP since 1999, where she expanded into the areas of international copyright, accessibility, and e-books. Carrie was the recipient of the 2001 ALA Staff Achievement Award, and the 2013 ABC-CLIO/Greenwood Award for Best Book in Library Literature for Copyright: An Everyday Guide for K-12 Librarians and Educators. She also authored Complete Copyright: An Everyday Guide for Librarians, now in its second edition. Carrie has a Masters in Library and Information Science (MLIS) from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and a Master of Arts (media arts with an emphasis on the political economy of information) from the University of Arizona.  

Open Q&A Session
Room: Berger Hall (University Center)
Presenter: Carrie Russell, Kenneth D. Crews, & Kevin Smith
Description: Conference participants will have the opportunity to ask a panel of experts questions about the application of Copyright, Trademark, and Patent Law.