Ethics in Sport
 

 
Ethics in Soccer Image
 

 
A web portal with resources on ethics in sport for academic institutions, students, sports business, youth sport organizations and associations.



A web portal with resources on ethics in sport for academic institutions, students, sports business, youth sport organizations and associations.

Sport encompasses many opportunities for the application of ethics, whether you are playing, refereeing, coaching, or are involved in the management of a sport organization. It is easy to venture down a road of unethical decisions because at its core, sport competition is about winning. Bill Daniels understood there was a greater meaning behind sport management. In 1980, he made the very personal and ethical decision to repay with interest every stakeholder affected by the bankruptcy of the Utah Stars.

 

Wynalda - Story about Dad

 

To serve as a resource for sport ethics, the Daniels Fund Ethics Initiative at UCCS will provide workshops on ethics in sport to the community. 

Events & Speakers

From FIFA to the Pitch, the Ethics of Soccer - Student Workshop and Community Panel Presentation - October 2015 

Event details: FIFA to the Pitch, the Ethics of Soccer

Publication Resources

Harris, S., Mori, K., & Collins, M. (2009). Great Expectations: Voluntary Sports Clubs and Their Role in Delivering National Policy for English Sport. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, 20(4), 405-423. doi:10.1007/s11266-009-9095-y

Abstract

Voluntary sports clubs (VSCs) account for about a quarter of all volunteering in England. The volunteers work in a mutual aid, self-production, self-consumption system whose main purpose is identifying and nurturing high-level performers. But the new HMG/Sport England strategies leading to London 2012 expects volunteers to make a major contribution to sustaining and extending participation. The study utilized six focus group sessions with a total of 36 officials and members of 36 clubs across the six counties of Eastern England to assess whether and to what extent government policy objectives can be delivered through the voluntary sector. The study focused on the perceptions and attitudes of club members about being expected to serve public policy and the current pressures they and their clubs face. The results lead the authors to question the appropriateness, sensitivity, and feasibility of current sport policy, particularly the emphasis on VSCs as policy implementers.

Journal article link to: Great Expectations: Voluntary Sports Clubs and Their Role in Delivering National Policy for English Sport.   

May, T., Harris, S., & Collins, M. (2012, October 31). Implementing community sport policy: Understanding the variety of voluntary club types and their attitudes to policy. International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics, 5(3), 397-419. doi:10.1080/19406940.2012.735688

Abstract

The Olympic Legacy Plan has been a governmental concern prior to the London 2012 Games, particularly, the aspiration to use the event to inspire participation in sport. However, scant attention has been directed towards the voluntary sector and its role as a delivery agent of the legacy aspirations. New policies for community sport set out a clear focus on using national governing bodies and voluntary sports clubs (VSCs) to deliver growth in adult sports participation and to reduce the proportion of participants dropping out of sport by the age of 25. How far voluntary organizations are aware of and comply with top-down approaches to policy implementation is debatable, particularly when considering the origins and motives of voluntary clubs, their heterogeneous characteristics and their general indifference towards national sport-related policy. This relationship forms the basis of this inquiry. It draws from implementation theory and seeks to explore how far VSCs are aware of policy goals and to understand club management practices and their likely impact on the role of the VSC in delivering community sport policy goals.

Journal article link to: Implementing community sport policy: Understanding the variety of voluntary club types and their attitudes to policy

Harris, S., & Houlihan, B. (2015). Competition or coalition? Evaluating the attitudes of National Governing Bodies of Sport and County Sport Partnerships towards School Sport Partnerships. International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics, 8(1), 151-171. doi:10.1080/19406940.2015.1024708

Abstract The article analyzes the concept of partnership and specifically explores the significance for the operation of partnerships, in the areas of youth and community sport, of the perspectives that partners bring to these relationships. The general context for the analysis is the increasing use of partnerships by government for the achievement of its sport policy objectives. The article examines the triangular relationship between School Sport Partnerships (SSPs), National Governing Bodies of Sport (NGBs), and County Sport Partnerships (CSPs). The specific context for the analysis is the decision by the Secretary of State for Education to remove funding from SSPs and the impact that this had on the triangular relationship. The study uses data from a number of semi-structured interviews and questionnaires with CSP and NGB representatives to explore their interpretations of this change.

Journal article link to: Competition or coalition? Evaluating the attitudes of National Governing Bodies of Sport and County Sport Partnerships towards School Sport Partnerships.

Harris, S., & Houlihan, B. (2014). Delivery networks and community sport in England. International Journal of Public Sector Management, 27(2), 113-127. doi:10.1108/ijpsm-07-2013-0095

Abstract

The paper aims to utilize Adam and Kriesi's network approach to policy analysis to examine the range of exogenous factors that affect interactions in the community sport policy process from a local authority perspective.

Journal article link to: Delivery networks and community sport in England

Harris, S., & Houlihan, B. (2016). Implementing the community sport legacy: The limits of partnerships, contracts and performance management. European Sport Management Quarterly, 16(4), 433-458. doi:10.1080/16184742.2016.1178315 Abstract

Research questions: Community sport policy is at the center of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games legacy plans. Specifically, the policy goal is to achieve year-on-year growth in mass sports participation. The government has committed significant public funding to the policy (£950 million between 2008 and 2017), a specific delivery system has been developed, and a number of techniques have been employed to manage and oversee policy implementation. This paper utilizes Marsh and Smith's [(2000). Understanding policy networks: Towards a dialectical approach. Political studies, 48, 4-21. doi:10.1111/1467-9248.00247] dialectical network approach to examine the community sport policy process, drawing particular attention to the effect of contemporary technologies of governing policy implementation [Green, M. (2009). Podium or participation? Analyzing policy priorities under changing modes of sport governance in the United Kingdom. International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics, 1(2), 121-144. doi:10.1080/19406940902950697].

Journal article link to: Implementing the community sport legacy: The limits of partnerships, contracts and performance management