Biology Graduate Courses

Specialized topics of current issues are considered, thus subject matter will change depending upon individual instructors and time of offering. The topic in any given semester will be specified in the semester schedule. May be repeated for credit. Prer., Graduate students only or consent of instructor. Meets with BIOL 4000.

Review and discussion of pertinent research subjects. Students will present their thesis proposals. Fall, Spring. Prer., Graduate standing in Biology MSc program.






 

 

An introduction to the principles, concepts, and processes involved in scientific research, with emphasis in biology. Includes study design, basic data analyses, data interpretation, and evaluation of the scientific literature. Requisites: BIOL 3830, MATH 1350 or consent of instructor. Meets with BIOL 3000.

A review of exercise prescription and health evaluation techniques including a special section on nutrition. Prer., BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2020. Meets with BIOL 4030.

An instructor training course for undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in biology education. This course is required for teaching lab courses in the general biology lab series. Prer., BIOL 1300/1310 (formerly BIOL 1200), BIOL 1350/1360 (formerly BIOL 1210), CHEM 1401/1402 (formerly CHEM 1301 or CHEM 1030), CHEM 1511/1513 (formerly CHEM 1311 or CHEM 1060). Meets with BIOL 4040.>

Covers viral structure, genetics and pathogenesis. Prer., Permission of instructor. Meets with BIOL 3140.

Topics include plant life cycles, systematics, life zones, and the use of field guides for identifying lichens, bryophytes, seedless vascular plants, vascular plants, gymnosperms and angiosperms in Colorado foothills, montane, subalpine and alpine life zones. Class meets once for lecture, then field study, sometimes including long hikes in difficult, mountainous terrain. Prer., BIOL 1200 or BIOL 1300/1310 and BIOL 1210 or BIOL 1350/1360. Meets with BIOL 4150.

An examination of how invertebrates and vertebrates have met the problems of survival through physiological adaptations. Prer., BIOL 1200 or BIOL 1300/1310, BIOL 1210 or BIOL 1350/1360, and BIOL 3020; Graduate students only. Meets with BIOL 3220.

Lecture. This course focuses on recent advances in understanding the molecular genetic and cellular mechanisms underlying nervous system development. This course introduces students to contemporary approaches for the study of neural development, emphasizing genetic and molecular techniques. Prer., BIOL 3020 and BIOL 3830. Meets with BIOL 4200.

An introduction to the basic principles and methods for studying human disease and improving public health. A basic statistics course is recommended. Meets with BIOL 4220.

A survey of typical sports-related injuries, their causes, treatment, rehabilitation and prevention. Prer., BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2020 or consent of instructor. Meets with BIOL 4230 and HSCI 4610.

Lecture, lab, and field studies. Origin, evolution and adaptation, geographic distribution, ecology, and taxonomy of mammals. Prer., BIOL 1200 or BIOL 1300/1310, and BIOL 1210 or BIOL 1350/1360. Meets with BIOL 4280.

An examination of plant assemblages in Colorado. Major plant communities will be examined in the context of environmental factors such as climate and landforms. Required field trip. Prer., GES 4260 or consent of instructor. Meets with BIOL 4290, GES 4290, and GES 5290.

An advanced course in Immunology to follow a junior- senior level introductory Immunology course. Prer., BIOL 3910. Meets with BIOL 4310.

Lecture and lab course using a systemic approach to human anatomy, focusing on musculoskeletal, nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Prer., BIOL 1200 or BIOL 1300/1310, and BIOL 1210 or BIOL 1350/1360. Meets with BIOL 4350 and HSCI 5350.

Lecture and laboratory. Integrative study of major organ systems, including nervous, endocrine, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, excretory, digestive, and reproductive functions of the human body. Prer., BIOL 2010, BIOL 2020, BIOL 3020, and MATH 1350. Meets with BIOL 4360.

This course will provide students with an advanced understanding of the cardiovascular system. Students will learn principles of human cardiovascular regulation upon exposure to physiological stress and observe this regulation in lab activities. Participation in laboratory experiences is required. Prer.; BIOL 2020. Meets with BIOL 4370.

This course explores the relationships between cellular structure & skeletal muscle function, examines skeletal muscle tissue histology & organization, and studies the functional properties of skeletal muscle while discussing the impacts on health, disease, and aging. Prer., BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2020 or Biology Major with Junior standing. Meets with BIOL 4380.

The study of animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective. Examines the adaptive significance of behaviors involved in survival, foraging, habitat selection, reproduction, and social interactions in animals ranging from insects to humans. Prer., BIOL 3830. Meets with BIOL 4420.

Problems concerned with the distribution of animals and their relations to each other and to their environment are considered. Local ecosystems are visited and sampled with special attention to sampling the animal communities. Contact instructor for call number. Prer., BIOL 1200 or BIOL 1300/1310, and BIOL 1210 or BIOL 1350/1360. Meets with BIOL 4430.

Laboratory course designed to introduce students to a variety of techniques used to study the concepts of genetics and molecular biology as described in lecture (BIOL 3830). Spring. Prer., BIOL 3830 or concurrent enrollment. Meets with BIOL 3840.

Wildlife diseases are examined with respect to causes, mechanisms of disease, epidemiology, pathobiology, population significance, and health issues to humans and livestock. Topics include viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic agents of disease. Prer., BIOL 1300, BIOL 1310, BIOL 1350, and BIOL 1360. Meets with BIOL 4445.

Course integrates musculoskeletal anatomy and scientific principles of relevant sport science disciplines (biomechanics, physiology, nutrition, psychology and technology), in a lecture/lab setting, to provide Professional Golf Management and Exercise Science students a comprehensive understanding of exercise science applications to golf. Meets with BIOL 3450.

A Introduction to biological research on the interactions among organisms and their environments. This course emphasizes field work in a variety of systems including soils, plants, insects, vertebrates, and aquatic biology. Lecture and laboratory. Prer., BIOL 1300, BIOL 1310, BIOL 1350, BIOL 1360, or by permission of the instructor. Meets with BIOL 4460.

An introduction to the mechanics of human movement. Includes the application of kinematics, kinetics, hydrodynamics, kinesiology and analytical techniques to human movement. Periodic trips to the International Center for Aquatic Research for analytical methods. Spring. Prer., PES 1010; BIOL 2010 or BIOL 4350. Meets with BIOL 4550.

A comprehensive survey of the biomechanics of musculoskeletal injury. The course explores the various bases of musculoskeletal injury to understand causal mechanisms, effects of injury on tissues, and how biomedical sciences contribute to injury management and prevention. Prer., BIOL 2010 or BIOL 4350 or BIOL 5350. Meets with BIOL 4600 and HSCI 5600.

This course is concerned with understanding evolutionary patterns and processes at the genetic level. Students learn principles behind methods used in the field and gain hands-on experience with techniques such as Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), gene sequencing, gene expression analysis, and bioinformatics. Prer., BIOL 3830. Meets with BIOL 4610.

A comprehensive study of basic tissue type stressing the structural and functional interrelations of these tissues within organs. Treatment of cellular ultrastructure and development as it relates to tissues. Emphasis on vertebrates, including human beings. Meets with BIOL 3620. Prer., Graduate students only.

Learn how fundamental principles of chemistry and biology are applied to modern day biotechnologies. Examine the chemical and biological properties of nucleic acids, proteins and restriction enzymes and how they are used to clone genes, characterize proteins and discover drugs. Prer., BIOL 4840. Meets with BIOL 4670.

The major focus is the application of biological and ecological principles to preserve biodiversity. Ultimate sources and current worldwide losses of biological diversity are emphasized. Because conservation biology demands multidisciplinary approaches, historical, legal, economic, and ethical issues are also included. Prer., BIOL 1150, BIOL 3700 recommended. Meets with GES 3750 and BIOL 3750.

A program of study and learning outside the classroom. Practical exposure to field of interest is intended to provide appropriate experience to a student’s career orientation. A variety of opportunities exists, and students may explore their own avenues as well. Some externships are in open competition. Students must have departmental permission and completed permission form to register. It is strongly suggested that students interested in this program plan their participation one semester before they plan to enroll. (Note: Externship is to be performed off campus at an institution performing biologically-oriented work, e.g., medical clinics and research laboratories.) Fall, Spring.

Involves the preparation and delivery of seminars by students and faculty on current research articles in the recent published literature. Topics include biochemistry, cell biology, ecology, genetics, physiology and molecular biology.

An advanced course in exercise physiology/biochemistry. Topics will involve extensive review of the scientific literature. These topics involve a review of current trends in sports science and are designed to give the student a practical application and interpretation of the sports sciences. Spring. Meets with BIOL 4770, HSCI 4060, and HSCI 5060.

Lecture/Lab. Students will gain proficiency in clinical laboratory techniques for assessing human respiratory, cardiovascular, muscular, and metabolic functions. Requires additional laboratory time each week. Prer., BIOL 3300 or BIOL 4360 or consent of instructor. Meets with BIOL 4790.

Extension of Exercise Physiology and Laboratory Methods in Exercise Physiology with specific attention to current topics and advances in the field. Prer., Consent of instructor. Meets with BIOL 4800.

Focuses on the biochemistry and techniques used to study prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression and regulation. Topics include transcription, translation, and transposition. Prer., BIOL 3020. Meets with BIOL 4840.

Designed primarily for the biology major and pre-health profession students. The course will cover mechanisms of human disease from cellular through organ and systemic pathologies. Major and pertinent health problems will be discussed. Lab materials are primarily from autopsy materials. Spring (odd years). Prer., BIOL 1100, BIOL 1150, BIOL 3020. Open to junior, senior or graduate students. Meets with BIOL 4900.

This course will introduce students to the myriad forms of communications that scientists must master to work effectively as researchers, policy-makers, science journalists or educators. Prer., graduate student enrollment.

For graduate students enrolled in the project option of the Master of Sciences program in Biology. Students will work independently with their advisor to develop a research-based capstone project and write a conference-quality research paper. Prer., BIOL 5010; enrollment in the MSc program.

An advanced study of biomechanics. Includes methods of smoothing raw data, joint force and torque calculations, three-dimensional theory and kinematics and kinetics in three dimensions. Prer., Consent of instructor.

Laboratory course for advanced biology students and graduate students interested in molecular biology, microbial genetics, and biotechnology. Course includes experimental design, laboratory projects, and interpretation and presentation of data from individual projects. Prer., BIOL 4840. Meets with BIOL 4930.

Laboratory course for advanced biology students and graduate students interested in exercise physiology and nutrition. Course includes experimental design, laboratory projects, and interpretation and presentation of data from individual projects. Meets 9 hours per week. Prer., BIOL 3300, BIOL 4810, and consent instructor. Meets with BIOL 4950.

Masters Thesis

Advanced students (usually seniors) are encouraged to pursue independent research in some specific area or problem where extensive reference to biological literature on that subject is available. Also encouraged is the design and execution of original research, either in the laboratory or field, that bears on the problem being considered. Prior to being admitted to this course, the student must submit an acceptable written proposal of the area or problem to be studied to the faculty member (selected by the student) who supervises the effort. Students must have consent of instructor and completed permission forms to register. Fall, Spring, Summer.

Advanced students (usually seniors) are encouraged to pursue independent research in some specific area or problem where extensive reference to biological literature on that subject is available. Also encouraged is the design and execution of original research, either in the laboratory or field, that bears on the problem being considered. Prior to being admitted to this course, the student must submit an acceptable written proposal of the area or problem to be studied to the faculty member (selected by the student) who supervises the effort. Students must have consent of instructor and completed permission forms to register. Fall, Spring, Summer.

Advanced students (usually seniors) are encouraged to pursue independent research in some specific area or problem where extensive reference to biological literature on that subject is available. Also encouraged is the design and execution of original research, either in the laboratory or field, that bears on the problem being considered. Prior to being admitted to this course, the student must submit an acceptable written proposal of the area or problem to be studied to the faculty member (selected by the student) who supervises the effort. Students must have consent of instructor and completed permission forms to register. Fall, Spring, Summer.

Advanced students (usually seniors) are encouraged to pursue independent research in some specific area or problem where extensive reference to biological literature on that subject is available. Also encouraged is the design and execution of original research, either in the laboratory or field, that bears on the problem being considered. Prior to being admitted to this course, the student must submit an acceptable written proposal of the area or problem to be studied to the faculty member (selected by the student) who supervises the effort. Students must have consent of instructor and completed permission forms to register. Fall, Spring, Summer.


 

Advanced students (usually seniors) are encouraged to pursue independent research in some specific area or problem where extensive reference to biological literature on that subject is available. Also encouraged is the design and execution of original research, either in the laboratory or field, that bears on the problem being considered. Prior to being admitted to this course, the student must submit an acceptable written proposal of the area or problem to be studied to the faculty member (selected by the student) who supervises the effort. Students must have consent of instructor and completed permission forms to register. Fall, Spring, Summer.



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Advanced students (usually seniors) are encouraged to pursue independent research in some specific area or problem where extensive reference to biological literature on that subject is available. Also encouraged is the design and execution of original research, either in the laboratory or field, that bears on the problem being considered. Prior to being admitted to this course, the student must submit an acceptable written proposal of the area or problem to be studied to the faculty member (selected by the student) who supervises the effort. Students must have consent of instructor and completed permission forms to register. Fall, Spring, Summer.

Advanced students (usually seniors) are encouraged to pursue independent research in some specific area or problem where extensive reference to biological literature on that subject is available. Also encouraged is the design and execution of original research, either in the laboratory or field, that bears on the problem being considered. Prior to being admitted to this course, the student must submit an acceptable written proposal of the area or problem to be studied to the faculty member (selected by the student) who supervises the effort. Students must have consent of instructor and completed permission forms to register. Fall, Spring, Summer.

For advanced students who wish to pursue independent research for honors standing in biology. Description follows that for Independent Study in Biology (BIOL 9400). The course involves four phases: 1) A proposal must be submitted including a statement of the research goal, materials and methods, review of pertinent literature, and anticipated results. The proposal will be reviewed for acceptability. 2) Research must be carried out. 3) The thesis as a write-up of research should be in the form of a scholarly publication and will be reviewed for acceptability. 4) A seminar on the research must be presented to faculty and students in biology. It is strongly suggested that students initiate their work at the start of the last semester of their junior year. Fall, Spring.

Advanced students at the graduate level are encouraged to pursue independent research in some specific area or problem where extensive reference to biological literature on that subject is available. Also encouraged is the design and execution of original research, either in the laboratory or field, that bears on the problem being considered. Prior to being admitted to this course, the student must submit an acceptable written proposal of the area or problem to be studied to the faculty member (selected by the student) who supervises the effort. Students must have consent of instructor and completed permission forms to register. Fall, Spring, Summer.

Advanced students at the graduate level are encouraged to pursue independent research in some specific area or problem where extensive reference to biological literature on that subject is available. Also encouraged is the design and execution of original research, either in the laboratory or field, that bears on the problem being considered. Prior to being admitted to this course, the student must submit an acceptable written proposal of the area or problem to be studied to the faculty member (selected by the student) who supervises the effort. Students must have consent of instructor and completed permission forms to register. Fall, Spring, Summer.

Advanced students at the graduate level are encouraged to pursue independent research in some specific area or problem where extensive reference to biological literature on that subject is available. Also encouraged is the design and execution of original research, either in the laboratory or field, that bears on the problem being considered. Prior to being admitted to this course, the student must submit an acceptable written proposal of the area or problem to be studied to the faculty member (selected by the student) who supervises the effort. Students must have consent of instructor and completed permission forms to register. Fall, Spring, Summer.

Advanced students at the graduate level are encouraged to pursue independent research in some specific area or problem where extensive reference to biological literature on that subject is available. Also encouraged is the design and execution of original research, either in the laboratory or field, that bears on the problem being considered. Prior to being admitted to this course, the student must submit an acceptable written proposal of the area or problem to be studied to the faculty member (selected by the student) who supervises the effort. Students must have consent of instructor and completed permission forms to register. Fall, Spring, Summer.


 

Advanced students at the graduate level are encouraged to pursue independent research in some specific area or problem where extensive reference to biological literature on that subject is available. Also encouraged is the design and execution of original research, either in the laboratory or field, that bears on the problem being considered. Prior to being admitted to this course, the student must submit an acceptable written proposal of the area or problem to be studied to the faculty member (selected by the student) who supervises the effort. Students must have consent of instructor and completed permission forms to register. Fall, Spring, Summer.


 

Advanced students at the graduate level are encouraged to pursue independent research in some specific area or problem where extensive reference to biological literature on that subject is available. Also encouraged is the design and execution of original research, either in the laboratory or field, that bears on the problem being considered. Prior to being admitted to this course, the student must submit an acceptable written proposal of the area or problem to be studied to the faculty member (selected by the student) who supervises the effort. Students must have consent of instructor and completed permission forms to register. Fall, Spring, Summer. Req., Graduate students only.


 


Students will pursue independent research in cell biology. They are encouraged to design and execute original research. Prior to being admitted to this course, the student must submit an acceptable written proposal, of the area or problem to be studied, to the faculty member (selected by the student) who supervises the effort. Students must have the consent of the instructor and completed permission forms to register. Fall, spring, summer. Prer., BIOL 3020, Cell Biology.
 

Independent Study Senior Thesis

Candidate for Degree