FAQs: Air Force Careers

Most officers have a four-year commitment.  For pilots it is 10 years after pilot training and six years for Combat Systems Officers after training.  Air Battle Managers have a six-year commitment.

They will compete in a selection process much like the one of an enrollment allocation as an officer candidate.  The factors to be used will include their Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) scores, their field training performance rating, their grade point average (GPA), their academic major, their Fitness Assessment (FA) score and the Detachment Commander's rating.  They will know their specific Air Force job category approximately six months before they are commissioned.

No. The vast majority of Air Force jobs do not involve flying at all.  In the civilian world, there are thousands of jobs and careers – doctors, lawyers, law enforcement, engineers, financial careers, food-service management – the list is endless.  For almost every civilian out in the workforce, there is an Air Force officer counterpart performing a similar job.

Cadets normally commission in a special ceremony the same day/month they graduate.  They can expect to enter active duty approximately 30 days after graduation.

No.  Academic major plays a minor role in pilot and combat systems officer selection.  Cadets can major in any degree program and compete to receive a pilot or combat systems officer slot in Air Force ROTC.

To compete for the pilot or combat systems officer categories, a cadet must be able to complete their bachelor's degree and be commissioned through Air Force ROTC before they are 29 years old.

The United States Air Force Academy, Air Force ROTC and Officer Training School all produce qualified Air Force officers.  The Air Force achieves better diversity and talent by getting officers from more than one commissioning source.  Once on active duty, the single most important factor in promotion is job performance.  Commissioning source simply does not matter.