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Upper Division Geography and Environmental Studies Courses

 

GES 305-4. Introduction to Cartography. An introduction to the principles and theory of mapmaking. The emphasis will be on the design of maps for research and publication using technical pens, other drafting equipment, and computer software. The first half of the course will stress manual cartographic methods. The second half of the course will emphasize computer generated maps. Index

GES 320-4. Practical Meteorology. An introduction to weather elements and meteorological phenomena with emphasis on physical principles and practical application. Includes weather elements, air masses, clouds, precipitation, storms and other weather systems, weather map analysis, forecasting, weather control and modification, and current developments in the field of meteorology. Local and current weather facilities will be used to relate meteorological principles to actual observations. Index

GES 321-4. Basic Weather Analysis and Forecasting. An expanded application of meteorological principles with emphasis on modern techniques for interpreting and forecasting weather. Includes a review of basic principles, interpretation of various types of weather charts, and forecast techniques. Lecture sessions will be followed by student preparations of weather analysis and forecast charts. Prer., GES 100 or 320. Index

GES 325-3. The Geography of Climate Change. Students investigate the theory and evidence of climate change from a geographic perspective. This seminar style course studies the interactions and interrelationships of humans and environmental systems. Index

GES 366-3. Community Service: Theory and Practice. This course uses the theory of community building taught in the classroom as a stepping stone for individualized student projects that are done in conjunction with outside agencies and organizations. Index

GES 380-3. Regional Geography of the Pikes Peak Area. A regional, rather than synoptic, approach is taken to the study of two formal regions: the Great Plains and the Southern Rocky Mountains. We will look at the areas surrounding Colorado Springs, Cripple Creek, and the nearby High Plains. Index

GES 382-3. Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. Study of human relationship to the physical environment of Mexico, the Central American countries, and the Caribbean Islands. Index

GES 384-3. Geography of the Middle East. A physical, cultural, and economic approach to the arid lands of the Middle East, including the Arab lands of the Sahara. Index

GES 385-3. Historical Geography of the United States. This course attempts to convince the student of the value of studying older landscapes as a tool for understanding the landscapes of the present. Assumptions and conventional wisdom about the past will be challenged as the old is recreated as a first step to understanding the new. Index

GES 390-3. Historical Geography of the British Isles. (Hist. 341.) Traces the historical evolution of the British landscape from prehistoric times to the present day. Particular regions like Wales, Yorkshire, the Lake District, and Western Ireland will be examined in detail. Index

GES 400-4. Introductory Quantitative Methods in Geography. The application of statistical techniques to geographically organized data, areal distributions, and the solution of geographic research problems . Index

GES 401-4. Technology, Development and Economic Geography. Theory and issues in contemporary Economic Geography. This course will explore processes leading to inter-regional change, spatial interaction between places, and the homogenization of economies and cultures. Prer., Upper division standing and a background in human or economic geography, or consent of instructor. Index

GES 405-4. Advanced Cartography-GIS. An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as a research method. A basic understanding of cartography and computer use (e.g., DOS) is expected. Prer., GES 305 or consent of instructor. Index

GES 406-4. Introduction to Remote Sensing. The acquisition and interpretation of environmental and natural resource data by using aerial photography and other imagery. A project-oriented course which involves the use of various types of photography and analysis techniques. Prer., GES 100 or 101 or Geol. 101. Index

GES 408-4. Advanced Geographic information Systems (GIS). Theory and applications in contemporary GIS. This course focuses on graphic and database design and development. Database automation through the u se of programming will be stressed. Prer., GES 405/417 or consent of instructor. Index

GES 409-4. Advanced Remote Sensing. An introduction to the advanced methods of resource analysis using remotely sensed imagery. All relevant portions of the electromagnetic spectrum will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the digital image analysis (by microcomputer) of LANDSAT data. No previous computer experience required. Prer., GES 406. Field trips required. Index

GES 411-4. Introduction to Field Techniques. Methods of area analysis; classification, measurement, and analysis of areal characteristics; methods of mapping natural and cultural features of landscapes; use of compass, transit, level, alidade, and theodolite. Interview and sampling techniques. Field trips required. Index

GES 416-2 to 4. Teaching Geography. Practicum and/or tutorial, by special arrangement only, in the teaching of geography (for example, serving as small-group leaders or proctors in introductory courses, o r developing and/or testing curriculum materials). Prer., consent of instructor. Index

GES 417-3. Research Methods. Development of skills for research with emphasis on primary and secondary sources, on methods of evaluating source materials, and on geographic writing. Field trips optional. Index

GES 422-3. Synoptic Climatology. The physical processes involved with the development and transportation of weather systems. Selected topics include relationships between upper atmospheric flow and surface weather phenomena, synoptic evaluation of air masses and techniques for environmental analysis. Prer., GES 100. Index

GES 426. Biogeography. GES 426-4. Biogeography. An examination of the distribution of life on the
Earth's surface. The relationship between environmental factors and plant and animal
distributions will be the central theme. Changes in distributions through time will also be examined.
Required field trip. Index

GES 427. Advanced Biogeography. A project-oriented class with students studying the
distribution of plants as related to environmental factors. This class will combine lecture, fieldwork,
and data processing, resulting in maps and reports. The geographical area of study will be changed each
time. Index

GES 428-4. Plant Communities of the Western United States. An examination of plant assemblages in the contiguous United States west of the one-hundredth meridian. The distribution of major plant species will be used to illustrate plant community interactions with environmental factors such as climate and landforms.

GES 431-4. Principles of Geomorphology. Systematic study of weathering, mass-wasting, fluvial, wind, and marine processes and the landforms resulting from these processes. Prer., GES 101 or Geol. 101 or consent of instructor. Field trips required. Index

GES 432-3. Mountain Environmental Systems. Emphasizes all physical aspects of mountain environments including climate, geology, landforms and vegetation. The particular emphasis will be to study the inter relationships of these physical aspects with people who live, work, and recreate in the mountains of the world. Independent research required. Prer., GES 100 or consent of instructor. Field trips optional. Index

GES 434-4. Soils. Covers the nature and distribution of soils through an investigation of the basics of soil genesis and development. Stresses the environmental components involved in soil production and the geographic distribution of soil types. Prer., GES 101 or Geol. 101 or consent of instructor. Field trips required. Index

GES 441-3. Resource Management and Conservation. Inventory, policy, and management of natural resources. Nature, significance, distribution, and problems associated with water, forest, wildlife, soils, an d recreational resources. Emphasis is on experience in the United States, but other global problems will be included. Index

GES 445-3. Analysis of Environmental Systems. An analysis of the various factors involved in the development of environmental impact assessments. Emphasis will be on analytical procedures associated with the evaluation of environmental systems and applications to specific environmental impact problems. Index

GES 446-1 to 4. Field Studies in Geography. Field investigations focus on specific aspects of the landscape in a selected area. Topic and credit vary from year to year. Field trips required. Index

GES 448-3. Environmental Problems of Colorado. Discussion and investigation of the environmental problems of the state of Colorado with an emphasis on land planning and land use, pollution, transportation , energy, and hazards. Programs to alleviate as well as to minimize any further related environmental problems will be developed. Field trips optional. Index

GES 450-3. Water Resources and Water Problems. A descriptive interpretation and detailed inventory of hydroclimatic data, surface water, and ground water. Use of water is critically evaluated with emphasis on problems associated with geographic maldistribution, appropriation, irrigation, industry, pollution, and regional development. Field trips optional. Index

GES 451-3. Hydrology for the Environmental Scientist. The fundamentals of climatology, meteorology, and geophysics will be studied. Surface water, ground water, rainfall runoff, the nature and control of floods, evaporation, and hydrologic models will be covered. Index

GES 455-3. Disasters and Society. Case studies of slow- and quick-developing disasters will be discussed in a local, national, cross cultural, and global framework. Issues covered will include technological hazards, the role of environmental perception, risk-taking, decision making and the impact of legislative changes at the local, state, and national levels. Field trips optional. Index

GES 461-3. Urban Geography. Will explore 1) cities as points (history, location, function, and influence); 2) theoretical concepts (central place theory, manufacturing location); 3) cities as areas (land use, neighborhoods, minorities, migration, business location, transportation, urban problems); and 4) urban environmental policy and management. Prer., Upper division standing and a background in human or economic geography, or consent of instructor. Index

GES 470-1 to 4. Geographic Issues. Geographic perspectives or dimensions of selected areas such as pollution, poverty, world conflict, natural hazards, landscape perception or women's communities will be presented. Topics vary from year to year. Index

GES 473-3. Geography of Population. National and social patterns of population distribution; organization of populations; and methods of census, demographic analysis and mapping. Index

GES 475-3. Recreation, Tourism, and the Environment. An inquiry into the spatial distribution and environmental/cultural impacts of recreation and tourism, including international tourism. Recreational values, cultural norms and change, economic trade-offs, and future trends are included. Field trips optional. Index

GES 476-3. Women's Space, Women's Place; Women's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth. A re-examination of traditional aspects of cultural and regional geography from a feminist perspective. Understanding the full richness of the human experience in utilizing earth as habitat requires a conscious effort to explore the omissions about where, how, and why women live, work, migrate, perceive their environment, and generally contribute to the intricate mosa ic of spatial organization. The geographical origins and distributions of differing roles of women in a number of societies are also explored. Index

GES 481-3. Geography of Europe. Focus on regional variations in western Europe. Included will be a discussion of the major physical and cultural regions as well as a focus on specific topics or problems (economics, politics, historical evolution, urbanization, etc.). Index

GES 491-3. The World of Wines and Vines. Focus on the physical and cultural geography of the world's grape-producing regions. Coverage will include the study of terrain, soils, climate, and other aspects of physical geography; the historical geography of viticulture; the procedures and processes associated with growing grapes and making wines; and a detailed analysis of specific regions such as the Bordeaux area, the Napa Valley, and German wine regions. Index

GES 494-4. Seminar: Practicum in Image Processing. Individualized course designed as an outreach to the community for remote sensing and spatial analysis problems. Students work on projects from a variety of sources, including state and local government and the private sector. Students design, coordinate, and produce the work for these various organizations under the close supervision of the instructor. Prer. GES 409 or GES 509 or GES 517. Index

GES 497-3. Honors in Geography. Independent research and thesis for geography majors who have maintained a superior scholastic performance in their overall program and within the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies. For superior students who wish to attain honors in the field of geography. Students must apply and be accepted for honors by the GES faculty. Index

GES 498-1 to 6. Professional Experience II. Designed experiences involving application of specific, relevant concepts and skills in supervised employment situations. Prer., consent of instructor. Index

GES 499-3. Senior Thesis. An extensive independent study research course required of all GES majors. The course will be taken with a full-time departmental faculty person as the adviser. The paper produce d from this course should exhibit a broad working knowledge of the various aspects of the discipline of geography. Prer., at least second semester junior status and consent of instructor. Index

GES 500-4. Quantitative Methods. Research-oriented quantitative methods seminar. Advanced data analysis techniques for use in geographic and environmental research. Index

GES 501-3. Seminar: Geographic Research. An analysis of research topics and methodologies in geography. Students will define a research topic, review literature in their field of interest, and prepare a research proposal. Index

GES 505-4. Introduction to GIS for Graduate Students. Information Systems (GIS) as a research tool. Students will use ArcView or Arc/Info to complete a series of geographic projects and pursue the application of GIS to their own research areas. Index

GES 506-4. Remote Sensing. Intensive work on data acquisition using manual methods of imagery analysis. Specific research methods will be discussed. Students will accomplish several exercises and at lea st one major independent project. Index

GES 508-4. Advanced GIS for Graduate Students. Continued application of GIS for spatial analysis. Students will learn ARC/Info and complete original research projects in their field of interest. Index

GES 509-4. Seminar: Advanced Remote Sensing. Advanced analysis of problems in the acquisition, characteristics, and interpretation of environmental data by aerial photography and remote sensing imagery. Prer., GES 406 or GES 506. Field trips required. Index

GES 516-3. Workshop in Geographic Education. A course outlining methods of teaching geography in K-12. Includes discussion of important geographic concepts and their integration into the classroom. Stud ents will develop teaching activities and materials for incorporation into their curriculum. Prer., consent of instructor. Index

GES 517-1 to 4. Seminar: Research Methods. Intensive work in using various forms of data and field investigation for analysis of geographic problems. Case studies and field experience. Index

GES 522-3. Synoptic Climatology. The physical processes involved with the development and transportation of weather systems. Selected topics include relationships between upper atmospheric flow and surf ace weather phenomena, synoptic evaluation of air masses and techniques for environmental analysis. Prer., GES 100. Index

GES 526-4. Biogeography. An examination of the distribution of life on the Earth's surface. The relationship between environmental factors and plant and animal distributions will be the central theme. Changes in distributions through time will also be examined. Required field trip. Index

GES 527-4. Advanced Biogeography. A project-oriented class with students studying the distribution of plants as related to environmental factors. This class will combine lecture, field work, and data processing; resulting in maps and reports. Index

GES 528-4. Plant Communities of the Western United States. An examination of plant assemblages in the contiguous United States west of the one-hundredth meridian. The distribution of major plant species will be used to illustrate plant community interactions with environmental factors such as climate and landforms. Index

GES 531-4. Topics of Geomorphology. Current research in landform processes. Focus on the western United States. Field trips required. Index

GES 532-3. Mountain Environmental Systems Seminar. Same as GES 432 but will include additional research work. Field trips optional. Index

GES 534-4. Seminar: Soils. In-depth study of techniques used in analyzing soil characteristics as well as classification systems for global soils. Problems in human use and misuse of soils. Field trips required. Index

GES 541-3. Seminar in Resource Management and Conservation. An investigation of environmental problems with emphasis on land-planning and land use, pollution, water, energy and natural hazards. Prer., c onsent of instructor. Index

GES 542-3. Community Analysis. Explores numerous theoretical, methodological and experiential aspects of community as studied and practiced in geography, sociology and community development. Students wi ll gain an understanding of the meaning of community (to themselves and to society) and will study and practice methods for developing community in various settings. Index

GES 543-3. Seminar: Land Utilization. Theories of land use determination. Conflict among various users and means of determining solutions and exercising control over land use. Prer., consent of instruct or. Index

GES 545-3. Seminar: Analysis of Environmental Systems. Problems associated with development of environmental impact studies. Case examples and field work. Index

GES 548-3. Environmental Problems of Colorado. Specific land and resource use problems in Colorado. In-depth analysis of interacting systems of natural resources and human decision- making processes. Fi eld trips optional. Index

GES 550-3. Topics in Water Resource Management. Experience of water resource management in the United States, prospects for the future and problem-solving techniques. Critical analysis of issues important in the western United States. Field trips optional. Index

GES 551-3. Hydrology for the Environmental Scientist. The fundamentals of climatology, meteorology, and geophysics will be studied. Surface water, ground water, rainfall runoff, the nature and control o f floods, evaporation, and hydrologic models will be covered. Index

GES 555-3. Natural Hazards. The impact of extreme geophysical events on human society. Emphasis upon adaptations to extreme events and ways of reducing vulnerability and damage. Field trips optional. Index

GES 561-3. Urban Geography. Course addresses topics in urban location, urban morphology and design, urban function, and urban social issues. We analyze why cities look as they do and the role cities play in society. Emphasis is on cities in the United States. Index

GES 573-3. Population Geography. The geographic aspects of population characteristics including fertility, mortality, migration, distribution, and composition. Both theoretical and empirical considerati ons are included. Index

GES 575-3. Seminar: Recreation Geography. An inquiry into the spatial distribution and environmental conditions of recreation. Emphasis is on outdoor recreation in nonurban settings. The implications of recreational values to resource managers and land use decisions will be included. Field trips optional. Index

GES 577-3. History and Nature of Geography. A history of geographical ideas from Greek classical efforts through the 19th century. Prer., consent of instructor. Index

GES 578-3. Twentieth Century Geographic Thought. The interplay of ideas about humans and earth from environmental determinism to phenomenology. Emphasis is on the connections as well as differences in geographic thought between human and physical geography. Prer., consent of instructor. Index

GES 602-4. Data Processing in the Earth Sciences. Advanced data processing using digital image models and geographic information systems. Students will be responsible for extensive individual project design and completion. Prer., GES 405 or GES 409 or GES 509 or GES 517. Index

GES 672-3. Seminar in Historical Geography. Discussion of the scope and methodology of historical geography, including consideration of past and current trends, as well as future prospects. Seminar presentations on topics selected for their substantive importance. Index

GES 700-1 to 6. Masters Thesis. Index

GES 800-1 to 6. Doctoral Dissertation. Index

GES 940-1 to 4. Independent Study. Independent work for undergraduates. By special arrangement with faculty only. Only for students presenting strong geography preparation. Prer., consent of instructor. Index

GES 960-1 to 4. Independent Study. Independent work for graduate students. By special arrangement with faculty only. Prer., consent of instructor. Index

Department of Geography and Environmental Studies Home

 

 


 

Dept. of Geography and Environmental Studies,
Columbine Hall, COH2
University of Colorado, Colorado Springs 80918
Phone: 719.262.4065
Fax: 719.262.4066

 

BA in Geography
Dr. Robert Larkin
719.262.4053


MA in Applied Geography
Dr. John Harner
719-262-4097