Department of English

Chair's Message

Lesley Ginsberg

Welcome

Department of English offers the B.A. in English with options in Literature, Professional and Technical Writing, Rhetoric and Writing, Secondary Teaching, Pre-Licensure for Elementary Teaching, and Pre-Licensure for Special Education. We also offer minors in Creative Writing, Professional and Technical Writing, Rhetoric and Writing, and Literature.

It is often assumed that teaching is all you can do with an English degree. Teaching at any level is an important and meaningful career, and our graduates place well. But the English major offers a lot of flexibility; indeed, it has been called the most useful pre-professional degree.

Besides education, students with the B.A. in English go on to graduate school and/or to careers in publishing, business, creative writing, journalism, law, non-profit foundations, government, and library sciences, among others.

WHY? The English major gives you experience in

  • Analyzing texts in a range of genres from our own and other cultures that represent various historical periods and civic movements.
  • Reading written, visual, and digital texts closely and critically.
  • Conducting research and evaluating and synthesizing evidence.
  • Composing your own writing that responds effectively to an array of rhetorical contexts, purposes, and audiences.

Our faculty comprises experienced and engaging teachers who are professionally active with research and creative works in the fields of British and American literature; the literatures of Ethnic/Immigrant Experience, Diversity, and Inclusion; Gender and Critical Race Studies; Sustainability; Rhetoric Studies and Writing Theory and Pedagogy; Professional and Technical Writing; and Creative Writing.

Please visit the links that describe all that is available to you in the Department of English.

We look forward to teaching you.

 

Events

Public Lecture

You are warmly invited to a public lecture by Barbara Rothman, author of Weaving a Family: Untangling Race and Adoption.

Weaving together the sociological, the historical, and the personal, Barbara Katz Rothman looks at the contemporary American family through the lens of race, race through the lens of adoption, and all-race, family, and adoption-within the context of the changing meanings of motherhood.

The lecture will take place on Friday, October 17, from 2 – 4 pm in UC 122.

 

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College of Letters, Arts & Sciences | Department of English
Phone: (719) 255-4018 | Location: CoH 1045
Department Chair Dr. Lesley Ginsberg | Phone: (719) 255-4004 | lginsber@uccs.edu
Administrative Contact: Rose Johnson | Phone: (719) 255-4018 | rjohnso8@uccs.edu
 
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