Undergraduate Research Projects

At this year's Mountain Lion Research day, held on April 5, 2013, the first members of the Undergraduate Research Academy (URA) were introduced to the campus. These undergraduate students will have a special opportunity to work with their faculty advisors on real life research projects. During the academic year, each student will spend approximately ten hours a week on their research project, and thirty hours a week during the summer. When funding allows, they will be paid for their work on the project.

Not only will the students engage in active research, they will also have opportunities to demonstrate their knowledge. Next year's Mountain Lion Research day will feature posters from the URA students, and monthly seminars will be held for students to make presentations about their research. To be considered for URA membership, students must apply during their sophomore or junior year, have a faculty mentor, and have an honors GPA.

Analysis of Cognitive Performance Disparity Between Incremental and Non-Incremental Digit Span Testing

Mentor: Brandon Gavett

Department: Psychology

"I have selected medical anthropology because of its role in advocating for social justice in healthcare and the reduction of stratified health inequality"

Jason Adams
Class of 2014

 

 

Beamed Energy Propulsion mm-Wave Heat Exchanger

Mentor: Rebecca Webb

Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

"I love that we are given the opportunity to work on meaningful projects and get to experience what it's like to be a working engineer"

Mario Arias
Class of 2014

 

 

Satellite Micropropulsion Investigation

Mentor: Andrew Ketsdever

Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

"The prospect of working on and advancing new technologies in aerospace, and the prospect of one day exploring space makes me excited about my major."

Christopher Brown
Class of 2016

 

 

Computational Modeling of Intracranial Aneurysms

Mentor: Michael Calvisi

Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

"Computational Modeling of Intracranial Aneurysms Research provides me an opportunity to use the knowledge I have gained from my classes and challenges my problem solving abilities"

Colin Curtis
Class of 2014

 

 

The Stability of Preferences in Older Adults with and without Dementia

Mentor: Leilani Feliciano

Department: Psychology

"I have the opportunity make some difference in an individual's life. It is exciting being able to interact with people, collecting data, and seeing the results of what you researched come together."

Sandra Garcia
Class of 2014

 

 

Defining Functional Links Between Specific Genes and an Adaptive Trait

Mentor: Jeremy Bono

Department: Biology

"I chose this project because the concept (adaptation) and model system involved are very exciting to me, and I think I will continue studying similar concepts in the future."

Kim Hoang
Class of 2014

 

 

Early Modern Recipes Online Collective

Mentor: Rebecca Laroche

Department: English

"I'm most excited about what will happen after the research is completed. When the manuscript is transcribed, it can be used for further research about recipes or history in general."

Sara Horton
Class of 2013

 

 

Early Modern Recipes Online Collective

Mentor: Rebecca Laroche

Department: English

"Looking at a writer's original hand, transcribing their actual words, and then delving into the riches of their writing is a new form of English scholarship that I am SO excited to be a part of."

Olivia Latendresse
Class of 2013

 

 

Carmen Abeyta Papers

Mentor: Mary Rupp

Department: Kraemer Family Library

"I love exploring how the UCCS community changed and evolved from the time Mrs. Abeyta was a student to now... I love learning the procedure of processing a collection, a skill that will take me far in my professional career."

Tawnie Mizer
Class of 2014

 

 

Role of cg11505 in Drosophila Melanogaster Development

Mentor: Eugenia Olesnicky Killian

Department: Biology

"I have always been fascinated by the biological world. It's very majestic and astonishing how this macroscopic world can be broken down into microscopic elements, and how each of these microscopic elements relate to one another in order to give rise to an organism."

Mary Morton
Class of 2014

 

 

Evaluating Ase1 Response to Microtubule Damage in Fission Yeast

Mentor: Tom Wolkow

Department: Biology

"Molecular genetics fascinates me because I can study and manipulate the genetic code of organisms to see how the microscopic machinery changes, and what effects that has on the cell as a whole."

Chris Richey
Class of 2014

 

 

Computational Evaluation of a High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage System

Mentor: Rebecca Webb

Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

"What excites me most about my research is being able to apply concepts learned in class to figure out difficult problems."

Faraz Saleem
Class of 2014

 

 

Characterization and Optimization of an Atomic Oxygen Source

Mentor: Andrew Ketsdever

Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

"I am excited to make a contribution to the next generation of space exploration. Research gives undergraduates the opportunity to apply knowledge from classes to real world applications and vice versa."

Corbin Spells
Class of 2014