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Workshops and Grants

 

The Compass Curriculum Announces Compass Curriculum Course Development Grants!

Grants of $500 for course development are offered for all areas of the Compass Curriculum. Grants of $1000 (per faculty) member are offered for Signature Navigate courses. All faculty are welcome to apply to develop a course.

We have particular emphasis this fall on Navigate and Signature Navigate (formerly called Advanced Core) courses, as well as Sustainability courses. However, we plan to consider proposals in all areas of the Compass Curriculum.

More information:

The Due Date is Oct 15 by 5 pm to gened@uccs.edu. Please make the email subject: Compass Grant.

You can write in the doc file itself, or you can write in MSWord and cut and paste into the grey areas of the doc file. We request that you make your department chair aware of your request for a grant submission so that everyone is on the same page.

Some areas of focus for the October deadline:

1. Sustainability: Courses flagged for Sustainability are requested with a focus on social equity, environmental protection, and/or economic development. We particularly encourage faculty to submit courses related to social equity and resources, as well as economic sustainability. These courses can be within a major, and for majors, with major prerequisites where appropriate.

2. Navigate and Signature Navigate courses: Navigate is the new name for Advanced Core courses with full conservation of the Advanced Core philosophy (3000 level, minimal prereqs., multidisciplinary, knowledge-in-action). Navigate course development grants will be $500, while those for Signature Navigate courses will be $1000.

Pending funding, the Compass Curriculum would like to pay faculty a stipend, per seat for Navigate students in their courses.

What are Signature Navigate courses?

Signature Navigate courses are Advanced Core courses where faculty from different disciplines or colleges team-teach the course. These courses would have 25 students per section, and two sections per course.

Pending funding, the Compass Curriculum plans to pay faculty $5000 per Signature Navigate section of 25.

While these two areas are our focus this October, we plan to fund course development in all Compass areas (GPS, Explore, Navigate, Sustainability, Inclusiveness, Writing Intensive, Summit, and Signature Navigate). We would particularly like to encourage faculty to consider submitting courses with multiple flags.

For more information please look at our website: http://www.uccs.edu/provost/compass-curriculum.html

There is also a website for students: http://www.uccs.edu/~compasscurriculum/

Questions about the Compass Curriculum?
David J. Weiss, Faculty Director, dweiss@uccs.edu, x3565

Questions about Navigate?
Glen Whitehead, Navigate Chair, gwhitehe@uccs.edu

Questions about Sustainability?
Steve Jennings, Sustainability Chair, sjenning@uccs.edu

Questions about Inclusiveness?
Christina Jimenez, Inclusiveness Chair, cjimenez@uccs.edu

Questions about Writing Intensive Courses?
Michelle Neely, Director of Writing Across the Curriculum, mneely2@uccs.edu

Questions about GPS?
Connie Staley, Director of GPS, cstaley@uccs.edu or Carrie carnold3@uccs.edu

Download Grant Application Here

Past Grants and Workshops Archive

 
 

Approved Courses

Approved Courses Download Course Relationships

Gateway Experience

ID 1010/3010- Gateway Program Seminar

Explore Courses

The Physical and Natural World

Beth-El College of Nursing and Health Sciences
HSCI 1060- Personal Nutrition/ BIOL 1050
College of Business
SPTM 2350- Sport Science for Sport Administrators
College of Engineering
CS 1080- Exploring Computer Technology
CS 1100- Problem Solving Through Game Creation
GDD 1100- Problem Solving Through Game Creation
MAE 1502- Principles of Engineering
Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Anthropology
ANTH 1030- Introduction to Human Origins
ANTH 3320- Primatology
ANTH 3370- Human Biology and Ecology
Biology
BIOL 1000- Biology in the Modern World
BIOL 1050- Personal Nutrition/ HSCI 1060
BIOL 1060- Introductory Biology Laboratory
BIOL 1350- General Biology II: Introduction to the Cell
BIOL 1360- General Biology II: Introduction to the Cell Laboratory
BIOL 2010- Human Anatomy and Physiology I
BIOL 2020- Human Anatomy and Physiology II
BIOL 3450- Anatomy and Exercise Science: Fundamentals and Applications to Golf
BIOL 4150- Field Botany
Chemistry
CHEM 1101- Chemistry in the Modern World
CHEM 1102- Chemistry in the Modern World Lab
CHEM 1121- CSI: Forensic Chemistry I
CHEM 1122- CSI: Forensic Chemistry I Lab
CHEM 1201- Introduction to Chemistry
CHEM 1211- Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry
CHEM 1221- Introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry
CHEM 1301- General Chemistry I
CHEM 1311- General Chemistry II
CHEM 1331- General Chemistry for Majors II
Geology
GEOL 1010- Physical Geology
GEOL 1020- Historical Geology
GEOL 3700- Environmental Geology
Geography
GES 1000- Environmental Systems: Climate and Vegetation
GES 1010- Environmental Systems: Landforms and Soils
GES 1050- Introduction to Map & Compass
History
HIST 1135- Introduction to Contemporary China
Mathematics
MATH 3010- Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I
MATH 3020- Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II
Physics and Energy Science
PES 1000- Physics in Everyday Life
PES 1040- Physics in Science Fiction
PES 1050- General Astronomy I
PES 1060- General Astronomy II
PES 1090- General Astronomy Lab I
PES 1100- General Astronomy Lab II
PES 1110- General Physics I- Calculus Based
PES 1140- Introduction to Physics Laboratory
PES/ENSC 1500- Introduction to Energy Science I
PES/ENSC 1510- Introduction to Energy Science II / ENSC 1510
Psychology
PSY 3270- Introduction to Biopsychology

Arts, Humanities, and Cultures

BI Program
INOV 1010- The Innovation Process
College of Education
COUN 3100- Career Planning
TED 4400- Children's Literature
Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Communication
COMM 2270- TV Studio Production
English
ENGL 1500- Introduction to Literature for Non-Majors
ENGL 2600- Literature: The Global Perspective I
ENGL 2610- Literature: The Global Perspective II
ENGL 2820- Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing
ENGL 2920- Exploring English Studies: Sustainability
ENGL 2930- Exploring English Studies: Inclusiveness
ENGL 3320- Born in the USA: Masterpieces of American Literature
ENGL 3910- Topics in Literature
History
HIST 1110- Asian History: Southeast Asia
HIST 1120- Asian History: The Indian Subcontinent
HIST 1130- Asian History: China
HIST 1135- Introduction to Contemporary China
HIST 1140- Asian History: Japan
HIST 1400- Latin America to 1810
HIST 1410- Latin America Since 1810
HIST 1510- U.S.: Birth of a Nation, 1607-1789
HIST 1520- U.S.: Expansion and Division, 1789-1877
HIST 1540- U.S.: Recent America, 1918-Present
HIST 1600- Making of the Modern Middle East I
HIST 1610- Making of the Modern Middle East II
ID
ID 2000, Mathematics: A Human Endeavor
Languages and Cultures
GER/FCS 3180- German/Austrian Civilization and Culture from 1700-1918
GER/FCS 3190- 20th and 21st Century German and Austrian Civilization and Culture
FR/FCS 3240- French Culture from 1700-1917
SPAN 3690- Hispanic Culture through Film / FCS 3690/FILM 3690
Philosophy
PHIL 1000- Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 1020- Introduction to Ethics
PHIL 1120- Critical Thinking
PHIL 1300- Introduction to Philosophies of Asia
PHIL 3100- World Religions
PHIL 3160- Philosophical Issues in Death and Dying
PHIL 3180- Practical Ethics
PHIL 4070- Existentialism
VAPA
AH 1500- Art and Ideas: Michelangelo to Basquiet
AH 2860- Survey: Modern Art I
DNCE 2700- Fundamentals of Dance Technique
MUS 1000- Introduction to Music
MUS 1000- Introduction to Music
MUS 2100- Rock and Roll Music
MUS 2150-The Computer in Music
MUS 2200- Balinese Gamelan Ensemble
MUS 2210- Mountain Lion Pep/Concert Band
MUS 2250- Jazz and Improv Ensemble
MUS 2400- Chamber Music Ensemble
MUS 3150- Introduction to Ethnomusicology
THTR 1000- Introduction to Theatre
THTR 2020- Acting Workshop I
VA 1010- Beginning Studio 2D
VA 1020- Beginning Studio 3D
VA 1040- Beginning Drawing
WEST
WEST 2030- Hip hop and the Performance of Identities
WEST 2070- Foundations in Native American Studies
WEST 3100- Women of Color: Image and Voice
WEST 3550- Native American Literature
WEST 4280- Native American Philosophical Thought

Society, Health and Behavior

BI Program
ENTP 1000- Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Beth-El College of Nursing and Health Sciences
HSCI 1020- Personal Fitness and Wellness
College of Business
ACCT 2010- Introduction to Financial Accounting
BUAD 1000- Introduction to Business
FNCE 1200- Personal and Financial Planning
INFS 1100- Microsoft Office Applications and Computer Basics
MGMT 3300- Introduction to Management and Organization
MKTG 3000- Principles of Marketing
College of Education
LEAD 1000- Foundations of Education
COUN 2500- Introduction to Addictions and Treatment
COUN 3000- Intracultural Socialization Patterns
CURR 4800- Schools, Society and Diversity
IECE 1010- Diversity and Child Development
College of Engineering
Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Anthropology
ANTH 1020- Introduction to Archaeology
ANTH 1040- Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 2800- The Nature of Language
ANTH 3040- Women Around the World/ WEST 3040
ANTH 3270- Archaeology of the Recent Past
Biology
BIOL 3450- Anatomy and Exercise Science: Fundamentals and Applications to Golf
Communication
COMM 1020- Interpersonal Communication
COMM 2010- Oral Communication in the Workplace
COMM 2100- Public Speaking
COMM 3400- Digital Communication Technologies
Economics
ECON 1000- The Economics of Social Issues
ECON 1010- Introduction to Microeconomics
ECON 1050- Economics in Practice
ECON 2020- Introduction to Macroeconomics
ECON 3150- History of Economic Thought
ECON 3710- Comparative Economic Systems
Geography
GES 1980- World Regional Geography
GES 1990- Introduction to Human Geography
Philosophy
PHIL 3200- Politics and the Law
PHIL 4260- Philosophy of Law
Political Science
PSC 1100- The American Political System
Psychology
PSY 1000- General Psychology
PSY 3400- Social Psychology
Sociology
SOC 1110- Introduction to Sociology
SOC 2110- Sex and Society
SOC 2200- Introduction to Racial and Ethnic Groups
SOC 2240- Childhood Socialization
SOC 2250- Gender Images
SOC 2500- Social Problems
SOC 3310- Sociology of the Family/ WEST 3310
SOC 3340- Food, Health, and Inequality
SOC 4700- Global Feminisms / WEST 4700
WEST
WEST 1010- Introduction to Social Justice Studies: Leadership, Inclusion, and Engagement
WEST 3000- Race and Gender at the Movies
WEST 3040- Women Around the World /ANTH 3040
WEST 3060- Multi-Racial Identities
WEST 3070- Global Men and Masculinities
WEST 3090- Peep Show: Sexuality in Popular Culture
WEST 3310 -Sociology of the Family/ SOC 3310
WEST 3620- Media and Consumption
WEST 4100- Native American Perspectives on Museums /MSGP 4100
WEST 4120- Indigenous Views on Sustainability: All My Relations
WEST 4700 Global Feminisms /SOC 4700
VAPA
MSGP 4100- Native American Perspectives on Museums /WEST 4100
School of Public Affairs
CJ 1001- Introduction to Criminal Justice

Navigate Courses

BI
INOV 3010- Innovation Team: Research and Execute
Beth-El College of Nursing and Health Sciences
HSCI 3630- Culture and Health
College of Business
ACCT 4960- Internship in Accounting
BUAD 4000- Business, Government, Law and Society
BUAD 4960- Internship in General Business
FNCE 4960- Internship in Finance
HRMG 4960- Internship in Human Resources
INFS 4960- Internship in Information Systems
INTB 4960- Internship in International Business
MGMT 4960- Internship in Management
PGMT 2100- Cooperative Internship IIa
PGMT 2110- Cooperative Internship IIb
SPTM 3960- Internship
College of Education
COUN4500- Wellness, Resilience, and Emotional Intelligence
College of Engineering
ECE 3001- Electronic Projects
ECE 3610- Engineering Probability and Statistics
MAE 3040- Engineering Ethics
College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Biology
BIOL 3411- Conservation Ecology
Communication
COMM 3240- Business and Professional Communication
COMM 3280- Intercultural and Global Communication
HUM
HUM 3990- Special Topics in the Humanities
Geography
MUS 3410- Sonic Landscapes / GES 3410
History
HIST 3040- Sex, Marriage, Death in Pre-Industrial Europe
HIST 3480- Ideas, Identities, and Indiscretions: Transformations in Early Modern Europe (1400-1800 c.e.)
HIST 4130- Baghdad to Burgos: Jews, Christians, & Muslims in the Medieval Mediterranean World (600-1500 c.e)
HIST 4280- Beyond the Pillars of Hercules: The Trans-Atlantic Empires of Spain and Portugal (1450 - 1750)
Philosophy
PHIL 3000- Cosmology and Culture
PHIL 3130- Biomedical Ethics
PHIL 3240- Images of War and Terrorism
VAPA
MUS 3410- Sonic Landscapes, Eco Acoustic Art /GES 3410
MUS 4250- The Business of Music: Entrepreneurship and Creative Enterprise
School of Public Affairs
CJ 3990- Art, Graffiti and Crime

Summit Experience

Beth-El College of Nursing and Health Sciences
NURS 4400- Community Health Nursing
NURS 4290- Advanced Nursing
HSCI 4319- Clinical Laboratory Management II
HSCI 4810- Allied Health Completion Summit
HSCI 4840- Program Evaluation
HSCI 4940- Nutrition Practicum
HSCI 4950- Exercise Testing and Prescription
College of Business
BUAD 4500- Cases and Concepts in Business Policy
College of Education
SPED 4031- Elementary/Secondary Student Teaching
TED 4630- Elementary- Student Teaching
TED 4730- Secondary- Student Teaching
UTED 4730- Apprentice Teaching (Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Math)
College of Engineering
CS 4100- Compiler Design I
ECE 4890- Senior Seminar
ECE 4899- Senior Design Project
MAE 4511- Engineering Design II
BI
ENTP 4500- Entrepreneurship and Strategy
Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Anthropology
ANTH- 4980 Senior Seminar in Anthropology
Biology
BIOL- 4010 Seminar in Biology
Chemistry
CHEM 4911- Chemistry Summit
CHEM 4921- Biochemistry of Human Health and Development
Communication
COMM 4000- Rhetorical Dimensions in Communication
COMM 4240- Advanced Organization Communication
COMM 4270- Digital Film Production
COMM 4350- Critical Analysis of Popular Culture
COMM 4800- Strategic Communication Tactics and Campaigns
COMM 4950- Seminar in Leadership and Organizational Change
English
ENGL 4090- PTW Senior Portfolio Practicum
ENGL 4300- Studies in American Literature and Culture
ENGL 4310- Harlem Renaissance
ENGL 4410- Topics in Contemporary Poetry Studies
ENGL 4700- Seminar in Literary Theory
ENGL 4880- Topics in Public Rhetorics
ENGL 4950- Seminar in Literary Topics
ENGL 4970- Seminar in Shakespeare Studies
Economics
ECON 4990-Senior Seminar
Geography
GES 4460- Field Studies in Geography
GES 4970- Honors in Geography
History
HIST 4990- Senior Thesis Seminar: Approaches to the Study of History
Languages and Cultures
SPAN 4970- Senior Seminar Spanish
Math
MATH 4040- Senior Math Seminar
Philosophy
PHIL 4950- Senior Seminar and Thesis
Physics
PES 4810- Senior Physics Seminar
Political Science
PSC 4020- The American Congress
PSC 4210- International Politics
PSC 4470- Constitutional Law
Psychology
PSY 4280-Seminar in Abnormal Psychology
PSY 4400-Senior Seminar in Social Psychology
PSY 4620- Seminar in Developmental Psychology
Sociology
SOC 4980- Summit Preparatory
SOC 4990- The Sociology Summit
VAPA
AH 4980- Senior Seminar in Art History
FILM 4980- Summit
MUS 4980- Music Summit: Senior Thesis
THTR 4980- Theatre Summit: Advanced Theatre Production
VA 4980- Professional Seminar
WEST
WEST 4950- Summit Senior Seminar
School of Public Affairs
CJ 4121- Ethics in Criminal Justice

Integrated Components

Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity)

BI Program
INOV 1010- The Innovation Process
Beth-El College of Nursing and Health Sciences
NURS 1230- Foundations of Nursing Practice
NURS 2080- Health Promotion
NURS 4400- Community Health Nursing
HSCI 3630- Culture and Health
College of Business
MGMT 3300- Introduction to Management and Organization
College of Education
LEAD 1000- Foundations of Education
TED 4400- Children's Literature
College of Engineering
GDD 2100- Game Design for Diverse Populations
MAE 1503- Introduction to Engineering Design
Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Anthropology
ANTH 1040- Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 3040- Women Around the World /WEST 3040
ANTH 3420- North American Indians / WEST 3420
English
ENGL 2600- Literature: The Global Perspective
ENGL 2610- Literature: The Global Perspective II
ENGL 2930- Exploring English Studies: Inclusiveness ENGL 4860- Rhetorics of the Family: From Narrow to Inclusive
Geography
GES 1980- World Regional Geography
GES 1990- Introduction to Human Geography
GES 3070- Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa
GES 3400- Geopolitics
GES 3820- Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean
GES 3980- Places and Faces: Geographic Issues in Film
History
HIST 1110- Asian History: Southeast Asia
HIST 1120- Asian History: The Indian Subcontinent
HIST 1130- Asian History: China
HIST 1135- Introduction to Contemporary China
HIST 1140- Asian History: Japan
HIST 1400- Latin America to 1810
HIST 1410- Latin America Since 1810
HIST 1540- U.S.: Recent America, 1918-Present
HIST 1600- Making of the Modern Middle East I
HIST 1610- Making of the Modern Middle East II
HIST 3010- Women in Classical Antiquity /PHIL 3140/WEST 3140
HIST 3120- The Panorama of World Civilizations to 1500
HIST 3220- Genocide: The Case of the Nazis
HIST 3550- Religion and American Culture: 1500-2000
HIST 3560- Modern Mexico
HIST 3590- Latin American History Through Film
HIST 3720- From Slavery to Freedom, 1607-1877/ WEST 3720
HIST 3730- Vision and History in Native-American and African-American Narratives /WEST 3730
HIST 4130- Baghdad to Burgos: Jews, Christians, & Muslims in the Medieval Mediterranean World (600-1500 c.e.)
HIST 4140- Women in Medieval Europe
HIST 4150- Astrolabes, Arms, & Azulejos (Tiles):Medieval Science, Technology, & Material Culture(600-1500 c.e.)
HIST 4160- A Crossroads of Civilizations: Medieval Spain and North Africa (600-1500 c.e.)
HIST 4280- Beyond the Pillars of Hercules: The Trans-Atlantic Empires of Spain and Portugal (1450 - 1750)
HIST 4500- World War Two: A Global History
HIST 4530- Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850 - 1877
HIST 4730- Classical Chinese Thoughts and Politics
HIST 4740- Between Revolution and Reform: The Making of Modern China (1800-2012)
HIST 4750- Modern Japan
HIST 4780- History of Modern Southeast Asia
HIST 4880- Research Seminar: Civil Rights in American History
ID
ID 3700- Art and Culture of Equatorial Africa
ID 3710- Great European Film Directors: A Historical View 1945-1994
Languages and Cultures
FCS 3240- French Culture from 1700-1917/ FR 3240
FCS 3380- Caribbean Literature, History, and Theory /WEST 3380
FR 3240- French Culture from 1700-1917 /FCS 3240
SPAN 3690- Hispanic Culture in Film /FILM 3690 /FCS 3690
Philosophy
PHIL 3140- Women in Classic Antiquity /HIST 3010/WEST 3140
Political Science
PSC 4480- Civil Rights and Liberties
Psychology
GRNT 3000- Introduction to Gerontology
Sociology
SOC 2220- Communities in a Global Environment
SOC 2250- Gender Images
SOC 3220- Urban and Community Sociology
SOC 3240- African American Community /WEST 3240
SOC 3250- Power, Privilege and Social Difference /WEST 3150
SOC 3290- Perspectives on Race and Ethnic Relations /WEST 3290
SOC 3340- Food, Health, and Inequality
SOC 3400- Criminology /WEST 3470
SOC 3490- Youth Gangs /WEST 3490
SOC 4040- Sociology of Gender and Sexuality /WEST 4040
SOC 4080- Men and Masculinities /WEST 4080
SOC 4200- Sociology of Poverty /WEST 4200
SOC 4240- Sociology of Dis/Ability
SOC 4290- Sport, Film, and Society
SOC 4380- Globalization and Development /WEST 4380
SOC 4390- Diversity Issues /WEST 4390
SOC 4660- Sociology of Medicine
SOC 4700- Global Feminisms /WEST 4700
SOC 4960- Juvenile Delinquency /WEST 4960
WEST
WEST 1010- Introduction to Social Justice Studies: Leadership, Inclusion and Engagment
WEST 2040- Global Black Women Writers
WEST 3040- Women Around the World /ANTH 3040
WEST 3090- Peep Show: Sexuality in Popular Culture
WEST 3100- Women of Color: Image and Voice
WEST 3140- Women in Classical Antiquity/HIST 3010/PHIL 3140
WEST 3290- Perspectives on Race and Ethnic Relations /SOC 3290
WEST 3150- Power, Privilege and Social Difference /SOC 3250
WEST 3240- African American Community /SOC 3240
WEST 3380- Caribbean Literature, History, and Theory /FCS 3380
WEST 3420- North American Indians / ANTH 3420
WEST 3470- Criminology /SOC 3400
WEST 3480- Global Women's Issues/ ANTH 3040
WEST 3490- Youth Gangs /SOC 3490
WEST 3720- From Slavery to Freedom, 1607-1877/ HIST 3720
WEST 3730- Vision and History in Native-American and African-American Narratives
WEST 4040- Sociology of Gender and Sexuality /SOC 4040
WEST 4080- Men and Masculinities /SOC 4080
WEST 4120- Indigenous Views on Sustainability
WEST 4200- Sociology of Poverty /SOC 4200
WEST 4280- Native American Philosophical Thought
WEST 4380- Globalization and Development /SOC 4380
WEST 4390- Diversity Issues /SOC 4390
WEST 4700- Global Feminisms /SOC 4700
WEST 4960- Juvenile Delinquency /SOC 4960
School of Public Affairs
CJ 4120- Race, Class, and Crime
PAD 3268- Contemporary Issues in Social and Public Policy

Sustainability

Beth-El College of Nursing and Health Sciences
NURS 2080- Health Promotion
HSCI 3950-Food Systems Management I
HSCI 4090- Food, Culture, Community, and Health
BI Program
ENTP 1000- Introduction to Entrepreneurship
College of Business
BUAD 4000- Business, Government, Law, and Society
College of Engineering
MAE 3302-Engineering Thermodynamics II
MAE 3320- Biomass Energy Systems
MAE 4302- Sustainable Energy Systems
Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Biology
BIOL 3411- Conservation Ecology
BIOL 3700- General Ecology
Chemistry
CHEM 4521- Environmental Chemistry
Economics
ECON 3310- Ecological Economics
ECON 3610- Work and Pay
ECON 3770- Economic Development
English
ENGL 2920- Exploring English Studies: Sustainability
Geology
GEOL 3700- Environmental Geology
Geography
GES 1000- Enviromental Systems: Climate and Vegetation
GES 3170- Saving Place
GES 3180- Changing Place
GES 3250- Geography of Climate Change
GES 4170- Writing Place
GES 4340- Soils
GES 4420- Conservation and US Public Lands
GES 4500- Water Resources and Water Problems
GES 4560- Cultural and Political Ecology
GES 4570- Militarization, Environment, and Society
GES 4610- Urban Geography
GES 4650- Restoration Geographies
GES 4750- Recreation, Tourism, and the Environment
GES 4800- Sustainability Seminar
GES 4920- Geography of Food
Philosophy
PHIL 4140- Philosophy, Globalization, and Sustainability
Physics and Energy Science
PES/ENSC 1600- Introductory Solar Energy
PES/ENSC 1620- Solar Energy Lab
Political Science
PSC 4290- International Environmental Politics
Sociology
SOC 3340- Food, Health, and Inequality
SOC 4250- Sociology of the Environment
SOC 4380- Globalization and Development /WEST 4380
SOC 4660- Sociology of Medicine
WEST
WEST 3620- Media and Consumption
WEST 4120- Indigenous Views on Sustainability: All My Relations
WEST 4380- Globalization and Development /SOC 4380
School of Public Affairs
CJ 3530- Management and Offenders

Writing Intensive Courses (WIC)

Beth-El College of Nursing and Health Sciences
NURS 2200- Fundamentals of Nursing Practice
NURS 4290-Advanced Nursing
HSCI 4010- Health Science Research
HSCI 4209- Clinical Immunology and Molecular Diagnostics
HSCI 4670- Health Assessment
HSCI 4930- Medical Nutrition Therapy I
HSCI 4950- Exercise Testing and Prescription
HSCI 4960- Medical Nutrition Therapy II
HSCI 4590- Concepts of Health and Disease
HSCI 4810- Allied Health Completion Summit
College of Business
BUAD 3000- Integrated Skills for Management
College of Education
TED 4400- Children's Literature
College of Engineering
ECE 3610- Engineering Probability and Statistics
GDD 2150- Fundamental Game Design Concepts
MAE 3040- Engineering Ethics
MAE 3130- Fluid Mechanics
MAE 3310- Heat and Mass Transfer
BI
INOV 2010- Innovation Team: Analyze and Report
INOV 3010- Innovation Team: Research and Execute
INOV 4010- Innovation Team: Design and Lead
Biology
BIOL 3411- Conservation Ecology
BIOL 4790- Laboratory Methods in Human Physiology
Letters, Arts, and Sciences
Chemistry
CHEM 1331- General Chemistry Majors II
CHEM 2001- Practical Scientific Writing
CHEM 4011- Instrumental Analysis
Communication
COMM 3240- Business and Professional Communication
COMM 4350- Critical Analysis of Popular Culture
English
ENGL 1800- Fundamentals of Creative Writing: Multiple Genres
ENGL 2030- Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry
ENGL 2040- Introduction to Creative Writing: Nonfiction Prose
ENGL 2050- Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction
ENGL 2600- Literature: The Global Perspective
ENGL 2920- Exploring English Studies: Sustainability
ENGL 2930- Exploring English Studies: Inclusiveness
ENGL 3010- Advance Rhetoric and Writing
ENGL 3080- Advanced Business and Technical Writing
ENGL 3120- Technical Editing and Style
ENGL 3910- Topics in Literature
ENGL 4860- Special Topics in Rhetoric and Writing
ENGL 4880- Topics in Public Rhetorics
ENGL 4970- Seminar in Shakespeare Studies
Environmental Sciences
ENSC 4090- Image Processing/ GES 4090
Geography
GES 3820- Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean
GES 4090- Image Processing
GES 4560- Cultural and Political Ecology
History
HIST 1400- Latin America to 1810
HIST 1410- Latin America Since 1810
HIST 1600- Making of the Modern Middle East I
HIST 3160- History of Ancient Egypt
HIST 3220- Genocide: The Case of Nazis and Jews
HIST 3480- Ideas, Identities, and Indiscretions: Transformations in Early Modern Europe (1400-1800 c.e.)
HIST 3550- Religion and American Culture: 1500-2000
HIST 3560- Modern Mexico
HIST 3590- Latin American History Through Film
HIST 4110- Early Medieval Europe
HIST 4130- Baghdad to Burgos: Jews, Christians, & Muslims in the Medieval Mediterranean World (600-1500 c.e)
HIST 4150- Astrolabes, Arms, & Azulejos (Tiles):Medieval Science, Technology, & Material Culture(600-1500 c.e.)
HIST 4160- A Crossroads of Civilizations: Medieval Spain and North Africa (600-1500 c.e.)
HIST 4280- Beyond the Pillars of Hercules: The Trans-Atlantic Empires of Spain and Portugal (1450 - 1750)
HIST 4750- Modern Japan
HIST 4770- Vietnam Wars
HIST 4780- History of Modern Southeast Asia
HIST 4803- Research Seminar: American West
HIST 4830- Research Seminar: Depression and War, 1929-1945
HIST 4880- Research Seminar: Civil Rights in American History
HIST 4990- Senior Thesis Seminar: Approaches to the Study of History
HUM
HUM 3990- Special Topics in the Humanities
Philosophy
PHIL 1020- Introduction to Ethics
PHIL 1300- Introduction to Philosophies of Asia
PHIL 3200- Politics and the Law
PHIL 3600- Philosophy of Religion
Political Science
PSC 4230- The United States in World Politics
PSC 4470- Constitutional Law
PSC 4480- Civil Rights and Liberties
Psychology
PSY 2110- Introduction to Psychological Research and Measurements
Sociology
SOC 2120- Introduction to Social Research /CJ 3100
VAPA
AH 1500- Art and Ideas: Michelangelo to Basquiat
AH 3240- The Art of Greece and Rome
AH 3250- Women, Visual Arts, and Culture
AH 3860- Contemporary Art
AH 4980- Senior Seminar in Art History
VAPA 1500- Arts Innovations: Methods and Practices
WEST
WEST 3990- Readings in Multiethnic Literature
School of Public Affairs
CJ 3100- Criminal Justice Research Methods
CJ 3250- Violence in Society
CJ 3990- Art, Graffiti and Crime

 

Updated 12/11/2014

 

Compass Curriculum submission

 

Submit or Revise Courses

If you have questions about course submission please contact David J. Weiss at dweiss@uccs.edu

 

DEADLINES

 

Online submissions will all be through the Provost's website. Revision of courses submitted through the Provost's website will also be done through the "Submit or Revise Courses" button.

2014 Deadlines for course submission to the Compass Curriculum:

  • Monday Sept. 8 by 5 pm.
  • Friday Oct 3 by 5 pm.
  • Friday Nov 7 by 5 pm.
  • Friday Dec 5 by 5 pm.
  • Friday Jan 23 by 5 pm.
  • Friday Feb 6 by 5pm.
  • Friday March 6 by 5 pm.
  • Friday April 3 by 5 pm.
  • Friday May 1 by 5pm.

Compass Curriculum Meeting Dates,
8-10:30 am on the following dates:

Wednesday, September 12 UC 307
Wednesday, October 1 CENT 102
Friday, October 24 CENT 102
Friday, December 5 UC 309
Thursday, December 18 UC 309

Spring 15- tentative:

Friday, February 6 UC 309
Friday, February 27 UC 309
Friday, March 27 UC 309
Friday, April 24 CENT 102
Friday, May 15 UC 309

Questions? David J. Weiss, dweiss@uccs.edu

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Download FAQ

Overview of Program

What is the new Compass Curriculum program?

This is our first faculty approved campus-wide general education program for all colleges. This program is planned to start in the Fall of 2014 with freshman. Transfer students will begin the program in the 2015-2016 academic year.

In addition to the existing composition and quantitative reasoning requirements already shared across colleges, the new curriculum framework consists of all freshmen taking a Gateway Experience (the former Freshman Seminar) course, followed by three Explore courses, a Navigate course (in the third year), and a Summit Experience. Note that the Summit Experience may possibly be a senior seminar course and can be from 0-3 credit hours within the major.

Other integrated components include two Writing Intensive courses, an Inclusiveness Course, and a Sustainability course. Students will also be required to take a quantitative reasoning course, and everyone will still be required to do a writing portfolio. LAS area and DOG requirements remain unchanged for students in LAS.

Critical Components:

Gateway Experience-
Oral Communication and Responsibility are critical components to the Gateway Experience. Explore- These courses introduce students to a breadth of disciplinary perspectives and methods providing a broad level of understanding within a particular discipline.
Navigate- These courses must focus on “Knowledge in Action,” centering on how engagement in real world endeavors is informed by academic knowledge.
Summit Experience- A Summit Experience centers on allowing students to synthesize skill development. Summit Experiences will include a focus on communication skills as well as critical and/or creative thinking. This course will be offered within the major.
Writing Intensive Courses (WIC)- WIC courses must emphasize writing as a process and assign at least 3000 words across assignments. This course could be integrated into students' majors, general electives, or general education coursework.
Sustainability Courses- Students will learn about social equity, environmental protection, and economic development, among others.
Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity)- Focus on preparing students for a society with diverse experiences, perspectives and realities, both in the US and, ideally, globally. May also focus on the dynamics and consequences of inclusion and exclusion.

How will this affect my students?
Freshmen entering in 2014 (and transfer students under 30 credit hours) will be required to take a Gateway Experience course (GPS 1010). Currently around 80% of our freshman students already take Freshman Seminar. Starting in the Fall of 2014, new students in all colleges on campus will take this intentionally designed program, giving them a signature UCCS experience and preparing them for their professional futures.

Explore courses and LAS Area requirements

How do Explore courses relate to LAS Area Requirements?
The Explore curriculum is comprised of courses focusing on 1) the Physical and Natural World, 2) the Arts, Humanities, and Cultures, and 3) Society, Social and Economic institutions, Health, and Human behavior. While these areas generally track the LAS Natural Sciences, Humanities, and Social Sciences well, Explore courses are requested from all colleges on campus.

Students will take three courses from the Explore curriculum with each course being from a different category.

Your department may consider listing up to 8 courses on the Explore list per area. For LAS departments, courses can be listed on both the Area requirement list as well as the Explore list, but students can't double-dip. LAS students must decide if a course will count for an LAS Area requirement or an Explore course.

How many Explore courses can my department propose to the GE program?
Your department can propose up to 8 courses/area per department. In fact, LAS departments may consider proposing all of their current Area courses, or adding new courses to the Explore list that are not on the Area requirement list.

Can an Explore course be upper division?
Yes: Explore courses can be lower or upper division.

Are all Explore courses open to students from all majors?
While departments may limit entrance based upon prerequisites, courses without prerequisites or with minimal prerequisites are encouraged.

Can a course offered from a student's major department count towards their Explore courses?
No.

How many Explore courses can a student take in the area of their minor?
Students can take two Explore courses in their minor in LAS.

What if a student takes an Explore course worth more credits than the minimum 3 for their course? For example, what if a student takes a 5 credit course instead of a 3 credit course? Can two credits count towards their LAS area requirements for that component?
No. While there is a minimum number of credits required, three Explore courses of at least three credit hours are required, as well as three courses from each area of the area requirements.

LAS DOG requirements and the Inclusiveness (Diversity/Global) requirement

How do courses that are approved for the LAS DOG requirement fit within the new GE framework?
The LAS DOG requirements remain unchanged for students in LAS. However, LAS courses (with C&R approval) that are currently approved on the DOG list in Diversity and Global Awareness may be submitted to the Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity) category. If courses on the current LAS approved DOG list are approved as Inclusiveness courses on the Compass Curriculum list, then LAS students may count them as their Compass Curriculum requirement. We hope that these courses will also be available to students of all colleges as well, where appropriate.

Integrated Components (Writing Intensive, Inclusiveness, and Sustainability)

Are courses within the Writing Intensive, Inclusiveness, or Sustainability components required to be upper division?
One of the Writing Intensive courses must be upper division. However, the Inclusiveness or Sustainability courses can be upper or lower division.

What type of support is available for faculty as they revise courses to include more writing?
We hope that existing courses can be adapted so that writing assignments help students develop disciplinary ways of knowing. Along these lines, Writing Intensive courses may be eligible for instructional support via "Writing Fellows." Writing Fellows help support writing assignments in a course by meeting with students, attending and participating in class activities, providing feedback on drafts, etc. Other instructional support includes seminars and stipends for your faculty to help with the revision of writing assignments.

Navigate courses

Are all Navigate courses open to students from all majors?
Ideally, all Navigate courses will be open to students of all majors, even if the course is offered for credit within a major, but this is not a requirement.

Can a Navigate course be lower division?
No. Navigate courses must be at the 3000 level.

Can courses count as both Explore and Navigate?
No. The intention of the program is for students to get a fundamental breadth of knowledge in a field as an Explore course. Navigate courses allow students to put their knowledge in action, actively applying and integrating knowledge beyond their major discipline.

Can a course offered with a disciplinary perspective within a student's major count towards their Navigate?
No. The intention is that students will take Navigate courses that broadly expand their perspective beyond their major discipline.

Counting courses as more than one category

Can a course count in both a main category (Explore, Navigate, Summit), and as Integrated Component (Inclusiveness, Writing Intensive, Sustainability)?
Yes.

Course Approval and Timeline

What is the course approval process?
The Compass Curriculum Committee consists of faculty from all colleges. Faculty submitting a course for review should fill out the online forms including pasting in a copy of their course syllabus. If there are multiple sections of a course, all sections will be held to the same standard if the course is approved for the Compass Curriculum.

The department chair will sign off on the proposal and submit it to the college curriculum committee for the next meeting. Upon approval by the college curriculum committee, the proposal will go to the Compass Curriculum Review Committee. Compass Curriculum Review Committee approved courses will be updated monthly on the Compass Curriculum website. The course evaluation process will be ongoing monthly throughout the fall/spring semesters.

How will courses be approved?
The Compass Curriculum Committee reviews all courses and meets with faculty who submit those courses monthly. The acceptability of a course is based upon a preponderance of evidence that the course fits the GE components. This means that while all items listed on the approval sheets are required at some level, some critical components must be incorporated at a deeper level than others. Page 1 lists the critical components on which a GE course must focus for approval into the GE Curriculum.

What do I need to do for my course to be approved by the Compass Curriculum Program?

Fill out the Submission form online through the Provost's website.

As faculty, after you submit a course online to the Compass Curriculum Program then an email will be generated to both you and your department chair. The order of approval before submission to the Compass Curriculum is as follows:

  1. Faculty submit a course online- an email is sent to both the faculty member and their department chair indicating a course has been submitted.
  2. Department Chair approval – this is done by clicking a link in the email that describes the course. If the course is not approved, the Department chair will discuss with the faculty.
  3. Curriculum Chair approval- when the department chair approves of a course, emails are sent to both the college curriculum committee chair and the college associate dean.
  4. College Associate Dean approval- once the Associate Dean approves of the course then the submission goes automatically to the Compass Curriculum program for review.

What if a course offers multiple sections?
Similar to LAS C&R rules, when a course is submitted to the Compass Curriculum Program for approval the online submission form needs only to be filled out once, and only one syllabus needs to be submitted. Please note that all sections of a course approved by the Compass Curriculum must satisfy the requirements of the Compass Curriculum in the category submitted. That means that if different faculty teach the course, and it has been approved for a Compass Curriculum category (Navigate, Explore, etc.), the course must still retain those components for which it has been approved.

What if my course could count for more than one component?
Because each component of the Compass Curriculum is different, faculty must submit the course to each area of the compass curriculum using a separate online form.

Student Success Related Policies

  1. Policy on students who change colleges after taking their second writing course.
    The policy of the Compass Curriculum is that students who take two approved writing program courses, regardless of the approved course, have completed the requirements of the Compass Curriculum. In some cases there may be additional college requirements, and the Compass Curriculum will defer to the college decision in those cases regarding if another course is necessary. In that case the request to take the additional course will come from the college, not the Compass Curriculum.
  2. Double counting courses between the Explore curriculum and the major.
    Explore courses must be taken outside of the major. If a student takes an Explore course from a department and then changes their major to one which includes that course in the major requirements, then an additional Explore course must be taken outside of the major.
  3. Students who matriculate at UCCS before fall 2014 are not required to take the Compass Curriculum even if they change colleges in their continuous enrollment at UCCS.
  4. Students who matriculate at UCCS before fall 2014 but then stop out for up to two years (and who do not enroll at another institution of higher learning within this time) are not required to enroll in the Compass Curriculum.
    This policy is directed towards military students who are deployed.

  5. Students who earn a bachelor's degree or higher from UCCS before fall 2014 and thereafter begin studies on an additional bachelor's degree are exempt from the Compass Curriculum.
  6. Students who hold a bachelor's degree from another institution, but matriculate at UCCS during or after fall 2014, will be viewed as transfer students.
  7. Students who enroll at UCCS with 13 or more transferrable credit hours are considered transfer students and will be exempt from the Compass Curriculum during the 2014-2015 academic year.
  8. Minimum grade requirements for Compass Curriculum courses.
    The minimum passing grade that will count for credit for a Compass Curriculum course is a D-. Departmental and college rules apply for courses within a student's major.
  9. Credit for courses that are cross-listed in LAS and Navigate.
    Under the conditions where a student takes a cross-listed course (e.g., WEST and HUM), credit for the Navigate will be given for either course assuming that it is an approved course for Navigate in the Compass Curriculum.
  10. Appeals to the Compass Curriculum.
    The Compass Curriculum Appeals Committee will review student appeals under the following conditions: 1) Students are in their last semester at UCCS and have a valid reason to request waiver of a Compass Curriculum course, and 2) under conditions where there is a disagreement regarding transfer credit for a course that students are requesting replace a Compass Curriculum course.

    This committee is comprised of faculty members at UCCS who will hear student's appeals. The Faculty Director of the Compass Curriculum will have veto authority on all committee decisions.
 

Policies and Course Snapshots

Compass Curriculum GPS flyer
Navigate Sustainability
Writing Intensive Courses Inclusiveness
Communication in Summit Courses
 

Program Overview

Program Overview Compass Curriculum Goals
High Impact Practices GE Framework

Gateway Experience

What is the objective of the Gateway Course?

Welcome students to the university and provides a high impact educational experience for all first-year college students.

Introduce students to an academic culture, including concepts of responsible engagement, intellectual inquiry, methods, and civil discourse.

Strengthen the academic skills students need for success at the university.

Generate enthusiasm among students by articulating the educational aims and meaningfulness of the UCCS university-wide GE curriculum.

Provide initial instruction for students on GE Goals addressing: oral communication and responsibility. The purpose of oral communication is to enhance students' public speaking/presenting skills and/or extend their understanding of communication processes and skills to other contexts such as interpersonal communication, group communication, or digital, visual, and performance media. The purpose of responsibility is to alert students to the need to act in a conscientious and respectful manner towards peers, colleagues, and fellow citizens, and to make decisions about one's action that are in conformance with disciplinary, civic, and more general ethical principles. After this initial introduction and instruction, students will continue to develop these skills and understandings through their coursework.

How will it be structured and supported?

UCCS faculty overwhelming believe that our Freshman Seminar should be molded into the Gateway Course because over the past twenty years the "gateway experience" has become a national model in the integrative learning movement. The Gateway course will communicate to students the General Education goals and competencies; so students understand what General Education is, why it is important, and what it means.

Currently, over 80% of fall freshmen take Freshman Seminar. As the program grows, strong efforts will be made to maintain class sizes under 20 students per section. Eventually, Freshman Seminar courses will also be offered during the Spring semester. The Freshman Seminar requirement will only apply to students who transfer to UCCS with fewer than 30 credit hours.
As the program grows beyond current Freshman Seminar (FS) Faculty and current FS courses, other UCCS tenured/tenured-track faculty and instructors will be encouraged to develop new FS courses. The Provost's Office is committed to fund the needed faculty off-loads (if taught on load) or overload stipends. The Center for Communication is committed to support faculty and student so they can address the public speaking/presenting goals of the Gateway course.

FS will encourage the development of rigorous college-level courses with high impact practices, and will remain open to new course ideas, enabling academic breadth and new opportunities for curricular creativity and innovation. As originally envisioned in the Freshman Seminar program, faculty will be encouraged to explore interdisciplinary and/or multidisciplinary approaches to the course topic.

JTAs (junior teaching assistants) will continue to team with faculty.

What will Freshman Seminar (Gateway) courses have in common? How will they deliver on the promise of the GE Goals? The Freshman Seminar Faculty and Director are committed to integrating into ALL FS courses these elements of the UCCS GE Goals:

Goal 1: Evaluate and Create. All Freshman Seminar Gateway courses will emphasize:

  • Critical and creative thinking skills: transitioning from high school competencies to university competencies
  • Information literacy/research skills: learning how to navigate the library and use online databases, university online technologies, and campus resources
  • Communication skills: developing reading, writing, speaking, and listening competencies
  • Specifically, Gateway courses will promote students' basic oral communication skills by including instruction on public speaking/presenting and providing an opportunity for students to experience, practice, and perform skills as well as receive feedback and performance evaluations.

Goal 2: Know and Explore. All Freshman Seminar Gateway courses will provide:

  • A broad understanding of their specific course topics as it related to various disciplines and professions.

Goal 3: Act and Interact. All Freshman Seminar Gateway courses will emphasize:

  • Responsibility: understanding the personal, civic, ethical, and social competencies that are required of university students (including academic professionalism and civil discourse)

Core Writing Courses

ENGL 1310 will remain the first core writing course across the university. ENGL 1410, ENGL 2080, ENGL 2090, or INOV 2100 will remain the second writing course options across the university.

English 1310: Rhetoric and Writing I is the first course of a two-semester written communication sequence required of all UCCS students. The course introduces students to academic reading and writing processes. Students develop critical reading, writing, and thinking skills through class discussion, the rhetorical analysis of academic and civic texts, and the writing of documented analytical essays. Students analyze texts written for diverse purposes and audiences. The course focuses on writing process theory and rhetorical theory and criticism, which serves two complementary purposes-to prepare writers for academic reading and writing assignments at the university level and to introduce students to rhetoric and writing as a field. Signature features of the UCCS ENGL 1310 experience include writing instruction in a computer-mediated classroom; low course caps of 19 students; extensive small group and whole class discussion; and one-on-one writing conferences for all ENGL 1310 students.

English 1410: Rhetoric and Writing II is the second course of a two-semester written communication sequence required of all UCCS students. The course focuses on academic inquiry and argument, building on the basic analytical and rhetorical proficiencies learned in ENGL 1310. Writers engage in extended inquiry, which enables them to investigate issues in their full complexity. ENGL 1410 assignments teach students how to responsibly gather, evaluate, and integrate a range of sources into their writing. Signature features of the UCCS ENGL 1410 course include the use of classical stasis theory for the rhetorical invention of arguments; foundational information literacy competencies that are integral to the research process; writing instruction in a computer- mediated classroom; low course caps of 19 students; extensive small group and whole class discussion; and one- on-one writing conferences for all ENGL 1410 students. Prer., ENGL 1310 or equivalent.

English 2080 and English 2090, offered by the Professional and Technical Writing Program, each satisfy the second writing course requirements for students in the College of Engineering and College of Business.

ENGL 2080: Business & Administrative Writing is the second course of a two-semester written communication sequence required of all UCCS students. This course is for all students and especially business and science majors. The course builds upon the basic analytical and rhetorical proficiencies learned in ENGL1310 by focusing on writing, reading, and thinking skills through class discussion, analysis of business and administrative texts, and creating business documents such as proposals, reports, letters and memos, and presentations. Signature features of the UCCS ENGL 2080 experience include the following: classical stasis theory; writing instruction in a computer-mediated classroom; low course caps of 19 students; extensive small group work and whole class discussion; and one-on-one writing conferences for all ENGL 2080 students. Students learn foundational information literacy competencies that are integral to the research process. Prer., ENGL 1310 or equivalent.

ENGL 2090: Technical Writing & Presentation is the second course of a two-semester written communication sequence required of all UCCS students. This course is for all students and especially engineering and science majors. The course builds upon the basic analytical and rhetorical proficiencies learned in ENGL1310. The course familiarizes students with the field of technical writing and teaches them to compose technical information- both written and visual-more effectively. Signature features of the UCCS ENGL 2090 experience include the following: classical stasis theory; technical writing instruction in a computer-mediated classroom with access to software tools for the design of written and visual texts; low course caps of 19 students; extensive small group work and whole class discussion; and one-on-one writing conferences for all ENGL 2090 students. Students learn foundational information literacy competencies that are integral to the research process. Prer., ENGL 1310 or equivalent.

INOV 2100 - Technical Writing, Proposals, and Presentations. Technical writing course. Replaces ENGL 2090 for Bachelor of Innovation majors. Addresses five major types of technical writing: project reports, funding proposals, magazine and trade articles, technical reports, and journal articles. Includes peer review and critical assessments of others' writings. Prer., ENGL 1310.

Quantitative Reasoning

The UCCS General Education goal of quantitative and qualitative reasoning proposes that well-educated people are able to think at a certain level of abstraction that includes competencies such as:

  • Constructing a logical argument based on the rules of inference
  • Analyzing and interpreting numerical data
  • Applying mathematical methods to solve problems in university work and daily life.

The proficiency requirement of this goal thus has two principal objectives. The first is to provide students with the analytical tools used in core curriculum courses and in their major areas of study. The second is to help students acquire the reasoning skills necessary to assess adequately the problems that confront them in daily life.

This requirement can be satisfied by taking coursework in mathematics and in either logic/critical thinking or statistics. These courses can be either in the major or outside the major.

Each college may recommend courses for approval for this requirement and may then specify courses that their students should take to satisfy the requirement.

Explore Curriculum

What is the Objective of Explore Courses? The "Explore" component encompasses three courses that expose students to a breadth of disciplinary perspectives and methods. To this end, the courses that satisfy this component are meant to provide a broad level of understanding within a particular discipline. Students will be required to take 3 courses (3 credits each = total 9 credits), with each one of those courses being from a different category. This type of engagement encourages students to explore disciplinary perspectives in order to gain a breadth of knowledge. Depending on the courses selected, the credit total could exceed 9 cr. since some courses in foreign languages or natural sciences with labs are more than 3 credits each. Regardless of the credit total, student will be required to complete one course in each category.

What is the Structure? The three categories are drawn directly from Goal 2: Know and Explore of the GE Goals. The concepts are rooted in the traditional academic divisions (arts, humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences), but expand on them to include courses offered by the professional colleges and allow more flexibility for course offerings beyond disciplinary constraints.

  1. The physical and natural world courses explore dynamics of natural sciences, engineering, and geography, among other relevant fields
  2. Arts, humanities, and cultures courses explore some focused aspect of these broad fields and will include options for foreign language study
  3. Society, social and economic institutions, health, and human behavior courses explore aspects of social sciences disciplines, business, criminal justice, nursing, and health sciences, among other relevant fields

What will ALL Explore Courses have in common? All courses within the campus-wide Explore Curriculum will also be asked to adhere to some general guidelines based on their specific "category" in order to ensure breadth of experiences, approaches, and methods. Guidelines are meant to introduce the learner to how knowledge/skills are acquired within the field and to find ways to apply these to the undergraduate learning experience as a whole.

Guidelines for Explore Courses: Faculty overwhelmingly supported these suggested guidelines for Explore Curriculum listed below. Explore Curriculum courses could be asked to include:

Goal 1: Evaluate and Create

Courses will teach knowledge of the essential terminology, concepts, and topics of the discipline.

Courses will teach skills, concepts, analytical tools, and/or basic research methods for engaging within the field.

Courses will provide opportunities for students to practice foundational skills, such as writing, oral communication, or qualitative and/or quantitative reasoning, among other possibilities, within an applied context.

Courses will encourage students to discuss methods and directions for assessing data and claims to new knowledge.

Goal 2: Know and Explore

Courses will allow students to know and explore different disciplinary approaches, especially given that students will complete one course in each broad category.

Courses will present ways to evaluate claims to knowledge outside the discipline (interdisciplinary perspectives) using the knowledge gained within the course.

Goal 3: Act and Interact

Courses will, where appropriate, reflect the core ethical principles and responsible methods of disciplinary work.

Navigate Curriculum

What is the objective of a Navigate GE course?

Provide UCCS students with a common educational experience at the upper-division level that broadly expands their perspective beyond their major discipline (within or between colleges), thus clarifying the value and relevance of GE learning and skills to their future work and lives.

Engage students actively in applying and integrating knowledge, which is drawn from a range of disciplines and includes advanced-level critical and creative thinking.

Promote curricular and intellectual connections between students' GE and major coursework, while providing students an opportunity to integrate their learning, ideally beyond their disciplinary area of study, thus distinguishing the Navigate course from the major Summit experience.

How will Navigate Courses be structured and supported?

These courses will have a flexible format; a set of designated courses with common elements and centered on common idea of putting knowledge into action will be offered by multiple departments and in different course structures.

All Navigate courses will center on the idea of "Knowledge In Action." Faculty from a broad range of disciplines will teach courses centered on how engagement in real world endeavors is informed by academic knowledge. These courses will underline the reality that putting ideas into action increasingly requires a broad- based understanding and an even broader ability to work with people from diverse backgrounds. The format of the classes will vary, but all will include hands-on, creative, and/or collaborative projects/activities that require students to reflect and build upon their academic and personal development.

Multiple course formats might include: interdisciplinary, project-focused, research-centered, student group projects, performance-based, field-based, internships, travel courses, service learning, weekend, or team-taught courses (across department or colleges), etc. Many current courses across UCCS departments could be re- focused, with minimal changes, to serve as Navigate courses. One intention is to encourage collaboration among students and among faculty from a range of departments and the professional schools in these courses.

Departments and/or colleges will be encouraged to offer Navigate courses proportional to their number of majors. Faculty will be encouraged to develop new hands-on, collaborative courses. In many cases, however, Navigate courses will be developed by modifying existing courses within each department to Navigate course guidelines. Optimally, Navigate courses will be open to non-majors, even if the course is offered for credit within specific majors. Students will be encouraged to take Navigate courses that push their disciplinary boundaries allowing them to apply and integrate their knowledge, beyond their focused major course of study, either within or between colleges. Flexibility and innovation will be considered in the implementation of this component to ensure the integrity of academic programs (including majors, minors, and General Education). Also, the current LAS Humanities Program is collaborating in the Navigate course discussions. Revamped HUM 3990 courses, adhering to common guidelines for all Navigate courses, will be among the options students, university-wide, can take to satisfy the Navigate requirement. As part of these efforts, the unique model of the Humanities Program will be broadened to include humanities-centered, team-taught courses across colleges and disciplines, providing new opportunities for cross-disciplinary collaboration.

Tenured/tenure-track faculty and instructors will be supported in their efforts to adapt existing courses to the Navigate guidelines as well as to develop new courses. The Provost's Office is committed to funding the additional costs associated with developing and staffing Navigate courses.

What will all Navigate courses have in common? How will they deliver of the promise of the GE Goals?

Goal 1: Evaluate and Create:

Courses will explicitly link action projects with academic skills and knowledge-particularly critical and creative thinking-ideally in ways beyond standard disciplinary assignments.

Courses will have students critically reflect on the "Knowledge in Action" learning experience using appropriate communication modalities at an advanced level-reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

Goal 2: Know and Explore:

Courses will be built around real world projects or applications from the broadest range of disciplines, ideally incorporating a multi-disciplinary approach.

Courses will show students how the practical application of knowledge/skills requires tapping into a range of perspectives and disciplinary approaches.

Goal 3: Act and Interact:

Courses will actively engage students in applying academic knowledge more broadly to real world endeavors and contexts, encouraging their use of critical, creative, collaborative, artistic, or innovative approaches.

Courses will explore what it takes to work with different types of people, bringing different perspectives to the topic, and highlighting the relevance of several areas of the Act and Interact GE Goal.

Faculty will share the ways they personally have connected knowledge to action.

Many existing courses could be adapted as Navigate Courses.

Summit Experience

What is the objective of a Summit Experience?

Summit Experiences provide advanced college students the opportunity to apply and integrate their knowledge and skills. Summits can ask students to demonstrate their ability to write, speak, and otherwise communicate ideas, to use knowledge, to solve problems, and to apply a variety of skills/competencies, both general and discipline-specific. Summit Experiences have been identified by the AAC&U (Association of American Colleges and Universities) as a high impact educational practice. Summits can be designed in a variety of ways. Regardless of the form of a Summit Experience, the demonstrative student outcome integrates knowledge from discipline specific and general education courses in a unique way. The Summit Experience allows students to synthesize skill development at the culmination of their undergraduate education. According to the National Survey of Student Engagement (2011), 50% of incoming freshmen expect to complete a culminating experience such as a Summit project. In addition, Summit Experiences include transfer students in UCCS's signature general education experience.

How will Summit Experiences be structured?

At UCCS, 20 out of the 27 undergraduate degree programs offer a Summit Experience (Switzer, High Impact Practices, UCCS, 2010). Each department will retain full control over the Summit experience for their major, whether it is a course or some other format. For majors without a Summit, the campus-wide GE curriculum encourages each department to develop a Summit Experience for their majors, based on departmental needs and disciplinary approaches. The department can frame the Summit Experience within an existing set of upper- division courses through the addition or retooling of a specific assignment or a project such as disciplinary portfolio, performance/installation, final reflective paper, case study presentation, service learning project, travel or immersion experiences, specific work preparation experience/certification, senior thesis, or even a designated senior seminar. The Summit Experience can be individual or group-project based. Summit does not need to be a separate course. It is an identifiable experience that can range, based on department needs, from 0-3 credits that are offered within a student's major degree.

In 2012, the GE Taskforce administered a survey to explore how current Summit programs are administered, to understand what has led some programs to drop Summit experiences from their curriculum, and to identify how current and potential Summit experiences can help connect students to both discipline-specific and general education goals. From this research, we found significant support behind the value of the Summit Experience. Of those who responded to the survey, 81% identified a Summit Experience as valuable for their specific program. Further, many of the barriers identified by survey respondents to implementing a Summit Experience stem from a narrow conception of a course-based Summit. To overcome these barriers, UCCS must embrace the variety of Summit styles already utilized by a variety of disciplines that focus on how students can demonstrate learning through an experience rather than course. (see Table 1).

The inclusion of a Summit Experience encourages students to bridge general education goals with discipline objectives, allowing all UCCS students to point to an enriching and culminating experience to their undergraduate education. A unique opportunity communicated by survey respondents is the desire to engage in Summit development with additional support from the University. The campus-wide GE curriculum may serve as the vehicle that takes advantage of this faculty interest.

Table 1. Faculty assessment of the Reasonableness of including the assessment of GE goals in a Summit.



What will all Summit experiences have in common? How will they deliver of the promise of the GE Goals?

  • Summit experiences will remain fully under the control of the major program. As suggested by the graph above, the current Summit experiences in many programs address several GE Goals.
  • Departments will be supported in their efforts to further identify and instruct their majors in core aspects of the GE Goals delivered in the Summit, such as explicit discussions of critical and/or creative thinking and or qualitative and quantitative reasoning. Departments will be encouraged to review the core ethical principles of their disciplinary work in the Summit.
  • Ideally, Summit experiences will encourage general communication skills development, related to public speaking/presenting, interpersonal (one to one) and/or group communication, or digital, visual, and performance media. At the discretion of the Summit faculty, students' communication skills could be developed by providing an opportunity for students to experience, practice, and perform the communication skill and to receive feedback.
  • Some examples of how communication skills could be included in the Summit experience are:
    • Public speaking/presenting: Students present a speech and receive feedback regarding their presentation skills.
    • Interpersonal (one to one) and/or group activities: Students participate in a group and/or interpersonal interaction related to their studies in the discipline and the Summit experience.
    • Digital, visual, and performance media: Students engage in an activity to demonstrate their understanding of the role and impact of media and technology on communication in their discipline.

Writing Portfolio

Currently, all UCCS undergraduates are required to submit a Writing Portfolio when they have earned between 60-90 credit hours. Students submit two papers, four or more pages each, from any course (besides ENGL 1310/1410 or their equivalents.) Group authored papers, lab reports, proposals, and other forms of student writing are acceptable portfolio submissions. Papers are scored as highly competent, competent, low pass, or needs work by faculty with expertise in writing instruction. Students who opt not to submit a writing portfolio, as well as those who do not pass the writing portfolio, are required to take ENGL 3010 (or ENGL 3080).

The purpose of the writing portfolio is to assess individual students' writing competency and to provide aggregated data about student writing performance for the purposes of assessment and accreditation. Faculty across disciplines score writing portfolios using a standardized rubric, which provides a different type of evaluation compared to the grades students earn on their writing assignments in courses.

Recent revision to the writing portfolio includes revising the scoring rubric, hiring faculty across disciplines to score writing portfolios, increasing communication with students about this graduation requirement, and encouraging students to work with the writing center on their portfolio submissions.

Future plans include moving the portfolio submission process online, working with departments to provide portfolio data for departmental assessment reports, and exploring alternative formats and content for the portfolio.

Writing Intensive Integrated Component

What is the objective, or purpose, of Writing Intensive courses?

In the Spring 2012 Faculty Retreat on General Education, 94% of faculty described writing as "extremely" important for students' academic, professional, and personal lives. Almost all faculty respondents supported the integration of Writing Intensive courses, with 91% supporting inclusion of Writing Intensive courses in both Major and General Education curricular requirements. In this way, Writing Intensive (WI) courses are a response to faculty demand for greater student engagement in writing practices/opportunities.

Writing intensive (WI) classes are listed among the high impact practices that promote student engagement and learning1. In WI designated classes, writing is embedded in the course to help students think critically about course content, practice core writing skills, develop information literacy2, and gain an understanding of disciplinary specific writing conventions and ways of knowing.3 These courses help students develop competencies established in the first-year writing sequence, ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1410/2080/2090/INOV2100.

Writing Intensive courses are grounded in the following theoretical assumptions:

  • Writing and thinking are interconnected recursive processes
  • Writing can play an important role in students' engagement with and understanding of course material
  • Writing must be practiced across contexts in order to promote transfer of learning4
  • Writing is a process, and all aspects of the process, from invention through drafting and revision must be taught
  • Writing abilities develop over time and across opportunities to write
  • Writers develop when they receive meaningful feedback on their work from peers and faculty
  • Writers need instruction as they develop into members of a disciplinary community5
  • Instructors in the disciplines are best positioned to provide students instruction in disciplinary specific writing conventions

How will Writing Intensive courses be structured?

Students will be required to take 2 WI-designated courses beyond the two writing program courses (ENGL 1310 and ENGL 1410, ENGL 2080, ENGL 2090, or INOV 2100). One WI-designated course must at the upper-division level. This WI component could be integrated into courses within students' majors, general electives, or general education coursework.

Courses may be designated Writing Intensive if they meet the following criteria:

  • Assign writing of at least 3000 words (approximately 12 pages) over multiple assignments and/or multiple submissions (revisions) of specific assignments (both formal and informal). Note that word count accrues across multiple submissions of an assignment. Assignments can be revised multiple times, with each revision contributing to the total word count.
  • Emphasize, through course assignments and class discussions, writing as a process
  • Devote class time to discussion of genre features and writing strategies
  • rovide students with feedback about their writing, including instructor and peer review, and allow at least one opportunity to submit revisions based on feedback
  • Assess writing assignments as a major portion of course grade (at least 25-30%)

Note that WI courses provide multiple opportunities for sustained engagement in writing. As such, the WI designation is not fulfilled via a single term paper due at the end of the course. Instead, the traditional "term paper" assignment can be broken into stages and supported through class discussion, peer review opportunities, and drafting. The Writing across the Curriculum director provides group seminars and individual consultations for faculty members who are revising courses to allow for more student writing and/or a process approach to composing.

How will Writing Intensive courses be identified?

The Writing across the Curriculum advisory committee, comprised of faculty across disciplines, will work with the Writing across the Curriculum director to review syllabi from faculty seeking Writing Intensive course designation. Once a course has been granted Writing Intensive status, faculty will need to resubmit syllabi materials regularly to reestablish the designation.

How will Writing Intensive courses be supported?

Course Caps: Writing Intensive courses could vary in size depending on the instructor, course requirements, and the available writing support. Generally, class size should be taken into account in order to allow time for instructor feedback on drafts of student writing as well as to promote the type of peer interactions that support students writing processes.

Writing Fellows: Writing Intensive courses are eligible for instructional support via a Writing Fellow, contingent on funding. Writing Fellows are advanced undergraduate or graduate students who have received special training to support students' composing, reviewing, and revising processes. They may conference with students, provide written feedback on students' drafts, and give some classroom instruction around the writing process.

Writing Center: The Writing Center will continue to offer broad instructional support to students. Support from the Writing Center is highly accessible to students and includes extended evening hours during the week and availability on Saturdays. In addition, writing consultations are available via a variety of formats, including synchronous and asynchronous web as well as in-person sessions. The Writing Center also offers in-class workshops for instructors and students.

Faculty Support: Faculty interested in teaching WI courses may receive stipends for professional development via Writing across the Curriculum faculty seminars. These seminars support faculty as they work to design and scaffold meaningful writing assignments and provide students with useful feedback and assessment. In addition to offering these seminars, the Writing across the Curriculum director is also available to meet individually with faculty members working to revise or develop course materials. On a departmental level, the Writing across the Curriculum Director will work with departments to identify WI course designates.

Information Literacy Instruction: Where appropriate, Library faculty will partner with teaching faculty to teach discipline-specific research strategies and concepts that help students identify, evaluate, locate, and use information effectively and ethically. Subject librarians also offer individual research consultations for students by appointment.

How will Writing Intensive courses deliver on the promise of the GE goals?

Writing Intensive courses encourage writing throughout GE and the disciplines and approach writing intentionally, emphasizing the practice of the discipline across multiple contexts. As such, Writing Intensive courses provide coherence throughout the degree and interconnections between GE and the disciplines.

Goal 1: Evaluate and Create

  • Writing engages our capacities to evaluate others' ideas as well as our own.
  • Writing is a creative act.
  • Writing prompts evaluation of sources and promotes information literacy.

Goal 2: Know and Explore

  • Writing is a means for knowing and exploring knowledge, and writing can serve as an artifact of our knowledge.
  • Written texts are means of creating and sharing knowledge within and among disciplines.

Goal 3: Act and Interact

  • Writing helps shape our understanding of concepts and promotes deeper processing of ideas generated from reading, listening, and thinking.
  • Writing can be a form of action in the world through grant proposals, op ed pieces, policy statements, and articles.
  • Writing is a medium through which we interact and engage with our communities.

1Kuh, George. High-Impact Education Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter. American Association of Colleges and Universities (2008).
2 Galvin, Jeanne. Information Literacy and Integrative Learning. College and Undergraduate Libraries 13.3. (2008).
3 Farris, Christine and Raymond Smith. Writing Intensive Courses: Tools for Curricular Change. Writing across the Curriculum: Tools for Curricular Change (1992).
4 Anson, Chris M. and L. Lee Forsberg. Moving Beyond the Academic Community: Transitional Stages in Professional Writing. Written Communication 7.2 (1990).
5 Clark, Irene L. and Andrea Hernandez. Genre Awareness, Academic Argument, and Transferability. The WAC Journal 22 (2011).

Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity) Integrated Component

What is the objective of an Inclusiveness GE course?

Deliver on the promise of GE Goal 3, which is to Act and Interact. This goal states, "Students will cultivate self- awareness and understanding of their impact-locally, nationally, and globally. Students will be prepared to participate effectively in a society that encompasses diverse experiences, perspectives, and realities. GE Goal 3, specifies that students learn about "Inclusiveness," and develop "competencies for cultural responsiveness across social differences in contexts ranging from local to global."

Show students how their understandings of different social and global perspectives are relevant to their education, careers, and lives.

Build on the existing strengths and uniqueness of UCCS in education around inclusiveness-locally, nationally, and globally.

The Inclusiveness integrated requirement would further our curricular and institutional efforts as articulated in the UCCS Strategic Plan 2012-201 under three strategic plan goals:

  • Foster academic programs that serve diverse communities and develop intellectually curious graduates who are globally and culturally competent.
  • Substantially increase international and domestic multicultural program opportunities and the number of international students and scholars on campus to build cultural understanding and to develop the global competencies of the UCCS community.
  • Build an inclusive UCCS educational community that attracts, embraces, and supports diverse students, faculty and staff to advance learning and scholarship in a multicultural world.

How will the integrated Inclusiveness component be structured and supported?

Departments will identity how the inclusiveness component already is/could be integrated into their major degree course content--either taught to students in one specific course, or integrated across several major degree requirements.

If having the content of Inclusiveness integrated into the major degree coursework is not a viable option, students will take a course addressing inclusiveness in their other GE or general elective courses. Many courses in the campus-wide GE curriculum (for examples, those in the Gateway, Explore curriculum, or Navigate) will address this content for those students. Integrated course content addressing inclusiveness should adhere to the guidelines explained below.

Many of the courses which currently fulfill LAS's "DOG" requirements (separate flagged courses for each: 1) D =diverse perspective; and 2) G = global awareness, would likely address this component. Due to their professional/academic accreditation standards, the College of Business, College of Education, and College of Nursing and Health Sciences currently address issues of inclusiveness in their curricula.

Tenured/tenure-track faculty and instructors will have access to educational resources to identify existing courses/ course content addressing inclusiveness and, where appropriate, to adapt existing course content or to develop new courses/ content to achieve the objectives of the Inclusiveness component. Providing leadership in inclusiveness education is already a priority identified at UCCS, and faculty in colleges across campus already have considerable experience incorporating elements of inclusiveness in the curriculum.

What are the guidelines that for addressing and integrating Inclusiveness?

Integrated content or specific courses satisfying this requirement may focus on either global (international) or diverse U.S. perspectives for a significant portion of course. Ideally, courses would discuss both local and global multicultural perspectives, but the focus may be on one or the other. Inclusiveness content/concepts may be addressed in course content, required readings, course objectives, assignments or activities, among other ways.

Inclusiveness courses would significantly address at least one of the following areas:

    • Instructors will explain how their course significantly prepares students "to participate effectively in a society that encompasses diverse experiences, perspectives, and realities," as stated in GE Goal 3. These courses will teach students the necessary understanding and/or competencies for effectively working with people across cultural and/or social differences.

----or----

  • Instructors will explain how their course significantly addresses "inclusiveness" so students "cultivate self- awareness and understanding of their impact-locally, nationally, and globally," as stated in GE Goal 3.

These courses will include a focus on international/global/diverse perspectives and explicitly address dynamics and consequences of exclusion and inclusion. This focus could address social, cultural, political, economic, geographic, spiritual, or other diverse perspectives.

Sustainability Integrated Component

What is the objective of a component integrating Sustainability?

The UCCS GE Goals approved in fall 2010 include the following:
"Goal 3) Act and Interact. Students will cultivate self-awareness and understanding of their impact-locally, nationally, and globally. Students will be prepared to participate effectively in a society that encompasses diverse experiences, perspectives, and realities. This area includes [among others]:

  • Sustainability-understanding the interaction between human development and the natural environment"



In order to achieve the terms of this goal, students will learn about key principles of sustainability including social equity, environmental protection, and economic development, among others. The sustainability GE goal will be achieved by integrating teaching about sustainability within discipline-specific coursework and/or other GE components, or in general elective courses.

Integrated content and/or courses will vary across disciplines and will examine the integrative nature of the sustainability concept to their disciplinary work. Ideally, students will gain knowledge about how to promote sustainability in their community and/or place of employment (e.g. support diversity, environmental activities such as recycling, reduction of waste, etc.).

An integrated Sustainability requirement will contribute to fulfilling UCCS' GE goals, as well as the UCCS Strategic Plan Goal 2, which aims to: "Provide excellence in leadership and execution of economic, environmental and social sustainability." Sustainability-related commitments already approved at UCCS include the American College and University Presidents' Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) and the Sustainability Strategic Plan (2012). The latter includes action items that can help inform the campus-wide General Education curriculum: a) to foster campus stewardship to minimize environmental impact and nurture a sense of place; and b) to provide exceptional education in sustainability and encourage experiential opportunities.

How will the integrated Sustainability component be structured and supported?

Departments will identity how the Sustainability component already is/could be integrated into their major degree course content--either taught to students in one specific course, or integrated across several major degree requirements.

If having the content of Sustainability integrated into the major degree coursework is not a viable option, students will take a course addressing sustainability in their other GE or general elective courses. Many courses in the campus-wide GE curriculum (for examples, those in the Gateway, Explore curriculum, or Navigate) will address this content for those students. Integrated course content or courses addressing sustainability should adhere to the guidelines explained below.

Tenured/tenure-track faculty and instructors will have access to educational resources to identify existing courses/ course content addressing sustainability and, where appropriate, to adapt existing course content or to develop new courses/ content to achieve the objectives of the Sustainability component. Providing leadership in sustainability education is already a priority identified at UCCS, and faculty in colleges across campus already have considerable experience incorporating elements of sustainability in the curriculum.

What are the guidelines for addressing and integrating Sustainability?

Course content/ courses satisfying the sustainability component will enable students to "cultivate self-awareness and understanding of their impact-locally, nationally, and globally," as stated in GE Goal 3, specifically around the concept of sustainability. Students will gain a necessary understanding and/or competencies for effectively understanding the interaction between human development and the natural environment.

Integrated content or specific courses satisfying this requirement may focus may be either sustainability-focused, with a substantial concentration on concepts of sustainability, or sustainability-related, with a significant emphasis on fostering an integrated understanding of sustainability in a discipline-specific or broader set of contexts. Sustainability content/ concepts may be addressed in course content, required readings, course objectives, assignments or activities, among other ways. Ideally, students will also learn how to apply sustainability concepts in their places of employment and other contexts beyond the classroom.