Winners 1984 to 1993

1984 | 1985 | 1986 | 1987 | 1988 | 1989 | 1990 | 1991 | 1992 | 1993

1984

Russel Shaffer on May 4, 1984, Russel received first prize that included a $1,000 scholarship and a pocket computer.
Sharing second prize honors were juniors John Williams, Palmer High School; Martin Puryear, Cheyenne Mountain High School; Chris Ford, Air Academy High School; and sophomore Scott Johnson, Mitchell High School. Each of them was awarded a $250 scholarship and a scientific calculator.

1985

In the First Olympiad Richard Wolniewicz received first honorable mention. This time the Air Academy High School senior from the class of Judy Williamson won first prize, which included a $600 scholarship and a computer by Radio Shack.

Second prize was awarded to a junior high school (!) student, a ninth grader, David Hunter, who received a $400 scholarship and books on mathematics donated by several judges. He submitted perfect solutions for the first four problems. Do not forget his name: you will see it in the next three chapters as well!

Three students were awarded third prizes: Tim Wood, a senior at Air Academy; Christopher Pounds, a Wasson junior; and Irving ninth-grader Bill Beltz were each awarded a Hewlett-Packard calculator and University and City memorabilia.

Fourth-prize awards went to Phil Herre, a Doherty senior; Tom Jones, a Doherty junior; Robert Lunday, a Calhan junior; Joe Hastings, a Cheyenne junior; Dave Coufal, a sophomore at Mitchell; and Mark Ruth, a Woodland Park ninth-grader.

1986

And the winner was David Hunter, already a sophomore at Palmer High School in the class of Victor Kuklin. He received first prize: a scholarship for a three-week International Summer Institute in South Hampton, Long Island, New York. There David attended lectures by famous scientists, Nobel Laureates, and my problem solving course. Among his 4 solved problems (4 , to be precise) there was the only solution of problem 5. This brought David the special prize for creativity sponsored annually by Robert Penkhus.

Three second prize winners received each a $300 scholarship and a scientific calculator by Hewlett-Packard. They and their schools were Ronald Wright, Manitou; David Coufal, Mitchell; and Rhett Rodewald, St. Mary’s. Ron and Rhet also participated in the International Summer Institute in South Hampton.

Students who won third prize were Gideon Yaffe, The Colorado Springs School; Scott Johnson, Mitchell; and Pete Rauch, Air Academy. They each received a Hewlett-Packard calculator.

1987

This year we had the first tie for the victory. First prizes were awarded to David Hunter (his second victory in a row!), now a junior from Victor Kuklin’s class at Palmer High School, and to Michael Eamon, a junior from Judy Williamson’s class at Air Academy High School. Each of them received a gold medal, a $2,000 scholarship for the International Summer Institute, and a Hewlett-Packard calculator.
Second prizes were awarded to Debbie Allison, a senior from Longmont, and to Patric Harlan from Rampart High School. They received silver medals, calculators, and books.
Third prizes were awarded to Gideon Yaffe from Colorado Springs School, Michael Lanker from Doherty High School, and three students from the class of Mr. Proctor at Woodland Park High School: Erik Wiener, Paul Simmons and Mark Ruth. These and other youngsters from a mountain town of Woodland Park showed a lot of perseverance. They were seventh graders when they first came to the Olympiad. Their third participation was a charm!

1988

First prize winners, David and Gideon, each were awarded a gold medal and a $1,000 scholarship.

Erik Olson, an Air Academy junior, and Chris Hall, a sophomore at Cheyenne Mountain, shared second prize. Each of them received a silver medal, a $500 scholarship, and a Hewlett- Packard calculator.

Third prize winners were Michael Eamon, an Air Academy senior who shared first prize the year before, and Matt Kahle, an Air Academy freshman.

1989

First prize was awarded to Pete Rauch, a senior from the class of Judy Williams at Air Academy High School. He solved over 4 problems out of 5. Pete was the only one out of 636 participants to solve Football for 23. He received a gold medal, a $1,000 scholarship, a Hewlett-Packard graphing calculator, my autographed book Mathematics as Problem Solving, and City and Olympiad memorabilia. Following his victory, Pete went to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

In a 6-way tie, second prizes were awarded to Clark Allred, a senior from Liberty, Scott Burles, a junior form Manitou Springs, Chi-Sun Chui, a senior from Palmer, Eric Nickerson, a senior from Palmer, and Chris Sprague, a junior from Rampart. Each of them received a silver medal, a $250 scholarship, a Hewlett-Packard calculator, my autographed book, and City and Olympiad memorabilia. Special prize for creativity, donated by Bob Penkhus, was awarded to the youngest of the second prize winners, a ninth grader, Mike Rauch, a brother of the first prize winner, Pete Rauch.

In a 5-way tie, third prizes were awarded to Greg Geihsler, a sophomore from Coronado, Dan Hedges, from Irving Junior High, Dennis Hwang, a junior from Palmer, Clay Kunz, a sophomore from Wasson, and Eric Olson, a senior from Air Academy. Each of them received a bronze medal, a Hewlett-Packard scientific calculator, my autographed book, a $25 book certificate, and City and Olympiad memorabilia. The United States Space Command Award, donated by the USSC Chief Scientist Dr. David Finkleman, was awarded to the youngest of the second prize winners, a ninth grader, Dan Hedges.

1990

It was a wonderful day for Matt Kahle, a junior from a class of Judy Williamson at Air Academy High School. He won first prize which included a gold medal, a $1,000 scholarship, a Hewlett-Packard graphing calculator, my new book How Does One Cut a Triangle?, and University and City memorabilia. He was also awarded the special prize for creativity.

Second prizes were awarded to Brian Becker, a junior from Coronado; Chris Sprague, a senior from Rampart; and Dan Hedges, a sophomore form Mitchell. Each received a silver medal, a $300 scholarship, a top scientific Hewlett-Packard calculator, the book How Does One Cut a Triangle?, and University and City memorabilia.

Third prizes went to Adam Feder of Fort Collins, Chris Hall of Cheyenne Mountain, Greg Geihsler of Coronado, Scott Burles of Manitou Springs, Tina Tackett of Liberty, and Shawn Ouderkirk of Air Academy. Each of them received a Hewlett-Packard calculator, my book Mathematics as Problem Solving, and UCCS and City memorabilia.

We also awarded 10 fourth prizes, 35 first honorable mentions, and 120 second honorable mentions.

1991

For the second consecutive year first prize was awarded to a senior from a class of Judy Williamson at Air Academy High School, Matt Kahle. Matt received a gold medal, a $1,000 scholarship, a Hewlett-Packard graphing calculator, an autographed copy of a two-week-old book, Geometric Etudes in Combinatorial Mathematics by V. Boltyanski and A. Soifer, University and City memorabilia, and a paper weight with a gallium chip from Cray Computer Corporation. Matt is now a student at Colorado State University, Fort Collins. He has been an Olympiad judge for the past two years.
Dan Hedges, a junior from Mitchell, won second prize. Dan received a silver medal, a $500 scholarship, an autographed copy of Geometric Etudes in Combinatorial Mathematics, a Hewlett-Packard graphing calculator, and memorabilia from the City, the University, and Cray Computer Corporation.
Third prizes were awarded to four young mathematicians: Mike Rauch, a junior from Air Academy; Andre Downer, a junior from Mitchell; Lisa Michaels, a senior from the Colorado Springs School; and Chris Dotur, a sophomore from Douglas County. Each of them received a bronze medal, a $125 scholarship, a Hewlett-Packard calculator,

1992

First prize was awarded to a senior from a class of George Daniels at Mitchell High School, Dan Hedges. Dan received a gold medal, a $1,000 scholarship, a Hewlett-Packard graphing calculator, an autographed set of my three books, and University and City memorabilia. He also won the special prize for creativity. Dan is currently a student at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas.
Chip Summer, a senior from Cheyenne Mountain, won second prize. Chip received a silver medal, a $500 scholarship, an autographed set of my three books, a Hewlett-Packard calculator and memorabilia form the City and the University.
Third prizes were awarded to four young mathematicians: Scott Mayer, a freshman from Fort Collins; Angel Kocovski, a senior from Doherty; Lawrence Smith, a sophomore, and Taylor Mohoney, a senior, both from Palmer. Each of them received a bronze medal, a $100 scholarship, a Casio or Texas Instuments scientific calculator, Geometric Etudes in Combinatorial Mathematics by V. Boltyanski and A. Soifer, a book gift certificate and memorabilia from the City and the University. Scott Mayer also received the United States Space Foundation creativity award that included a space pen and a year membership in the Foundation.

1993

In the field of 601 participants, first prize was awarded to senior Jon Hsu from a class of Larry Cattell at Green Mountain High School in Lakewood, Colorado. Jon received a gold medal, a $1,000 scholarship, a Hewlett-Packard graphing calculator, an autographed set of my three books, and University and City memorabilia.

Second prizes were awarded to four young mathematicians: Zach Harris from Fruita/Monument, Kevin Landmark from Coronado, Ben Olmstead from Parker Vista Middle School, and Kevin Wiatrowski from Woodland Park. Each of them received a silver medal, a $200 scholarship, my book How Does One Cut a Triangle?, a Hewlett-Packard graphing calculator, and memorabilia from the City and the University. Ben Olmstead, an eighth grader, was also awarded a special prize for creativity.

Third prizes were awarded to three contestants: Mark Friedberg from Palmer, Matt Baumgart from Arapahoe, and Chris Fry from Air Academy. Each of them received a bronze medal, a valuable CASIO overhead graphing scientific calculator, my book, and memorabilia from the City and the University.