Department of History

Upcoming Courses: Spring 2017

A survey of major political, economic, religious, and social themes of the ancient world, from the beginnings of civilization in the Near East to the end of the Roman empire in the West. Students will read a selection of original sources.

  • Taught by Brian Duvick 
  • Meets Mondays and Wednesdays 10:50 am - 12:05 pm
  • Lower-division undergraduate: HIST 1010

A survey of major political, economic, social, and cultural developments from the Reformation through the era of the French revolution. Students will read a selection of original sources.

  • Taught by Michael Martoccio
  • Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays 8:00 - 9:15 am
  • Lower-division undergraduate HIST 1030

Considers over 200 years of European history in terms of how Europeans thought about and tried to alter physical space; and how they thought of themselves as occupants of physical space while they wanted to push out others, or use them, or in some cases to try to understand them as human beings. With that perspective in place, we can take a fresh look at topics that are often taught, like imperialism, nationalism, economic growth, war, immigration. But we will try to consider these as changes that humans set in motion and that affected humans in turn. We will read books that keep moving and will hold your interest-- and watch some movies, too. Can we do without a long history textbook?

Can we look at subjects you have probably encountered before, like imperialism or war or immigration, from a new angle? The angle in this course is how Europeans thought about and acted upon physical space and how they dealt with people they regarded as different who happened to be in that space. Historians get onto the reading list only if they can look at history in a different light and write about their subject in a lively way.

  • Taught by Robert Sackett
  • Meets Mondays 4:45 - 7:20 pm
  • Lower-division undergraduate: HIST 1040

A survey of Japanese society, culture, politics, and economy, from the birth of Japanese civilizations to the present.

  • Taught by Yang Wei
  • Meets Thursdays 1:40 - 4:20 pm
  • Approved for LAS Humanities area and Global Awareness requirements
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity); Explore-Arts, Humanities, and Cultures.
  • Lower-division undergraduate: HIST 1140

Survey of the political, social, and economic development of Latin America since 1810.

  • Taught by Sarah Clay
  • Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:25 - 10:40 am
  • Approved for LAS Humanities area and Global Awareness requirements
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity); Explore-Arts, Humanities, and Cultures; Writing Intensive
  • Lower-division undergraduate: HIST 1410

According to the traditional narrative, Providence and American exceptionalism explain the English colonies' linear progression from settling the New World to the successful "birth of a new nation." We will test this convention by surveying the major social, cultural, economic, and political developments of colonial and Revolutionary periods to understand the people and the events in which they were a part on their own terms. We investigate various topics and themes including class, race, and gender to reveal and understand the conflicts and compromises that made up the colonials' social and government contracts and the implications of their decisions for future generations. To this end, we will read selected secondary and primary sources to analyze the colonists' ways of confronting, adapting to and transforming the New World.

  • Taught by Barbara Headle
  • Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays 12:15 - 1:30 pm
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Explore-Arts, Humanities, and Cultures
  • Lower-division undergraduate: HIST 1510

Survey of the major issues related to interpretation of the Jeffersonian and Jacksonian eras with emphasis on the challenges derived from westward expansion and the social, economic, and political factors contributing to disunion and war.

  • Taught by Susan Brandt
  • Meets Tuesdays 1:40 - 4:20 pm
  • Approved for Curriculum Requirement: Explore-Arts, Humanities, and Cultures
  • Lower-division undergraduate: HIST 1520

Survey of America's social, political, economic, and cultural history during the time the U.S. has been a world power. The roots of contemporary society, with emphasis on the emergence of a multicultural America.

Case studies, documentary films, internet research - an invigorating, enlightening course!

  • Taught by Bernice Forrest
  • Online course
  • Approved for LAS Humanities Area requirement
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Inclusiveness
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Explore - Arts, Humanities, and Culture
  • Lower-division undergraduate: HIST 1540

Survey of the political, social, economic, and intellectual currents in the Middle East from World War II until the present.

  • Taught by Carole Woodall
  • Approved for LAS Humanities area and Global Awareness requirements
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity)
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Explore - Arts, Humanities, and Cultures
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 1610
  • Taught by Peter Brumlik
  • Meets Wednesdays 4:45 - 7:20 pm
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3000-001

Considers British, Dutch, French and Spanish Empires from the beginning of the 18th Century to the outbreak of the First World War. We will consider why the governments in question entered into this extended rivalry to control non-European parts of the globe and what techniques they used to dominate non-European peoples. But the emphasis will be on human relationships in certain historical contexts: slavery, settler/colony and indigenous, travel. How did people really approach each other in the unequal relations of power that Empire created? What ideas about each other grew out of these encounters? Readings will include some by scholars who write in such a way as to get human conditions and emotions across; and also some by people at the time who give vivid testimony to what Empire meant to them.

 The world today confronts people with others across barriers of culture, religion, nation, gender, and so on. What makes this even more complex is that this all happens in conditions of unequal power. That sets the terms for these encounters but does not determine the outcome. Look at history. European empires of the 18th and 19th Centuries left a rich record of how people dealt with others across the barriers that faced them. That can make us imagine new possibilities.

  • Taught by Robert Sackett
  • Meets Wednesdays 1:40 - 4:20 pm
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3000-002
  • Taught by Brian Duvick
  • Meets Mondays and Wednesdays 1:40 - 2:55 pm
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3000-004

  • Taught by Michael Martoccio
  • Meets Tuesdays 10:50 am - 1:30 pm
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3000-007
  • Taught by Michael Martoccio
  • Meets Wednesdays 4:45 - 7:20 pm
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3000-008
  • Taught by Chris Hill
  • Winterim Course: Meets January 9 - 15, 1:15 - 7:15 pm
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive
  • This course is cross-listed
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3000-011
  • Taught by Paul Harvey and Chris Bairn
  • Meets Tuesdays 4:45 - 7:20 pm
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3000-B01
  • Taught by Cornelius Tyler
  • Weekend University course: Meets February 11 through April 22, Saturdays 8:30 am - 12:30 pm
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3000-WK1
  • Taught by Chris Hill and Roy Jo Sartin
  • Weekend University course: Meets February 11 through April 22, Saturdays 1:00 - 5:00 pm
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3000-WK2
  • This course is cross-listed

This course introduces undergraduate history majors (and students considering pursuing a history major) to the basic methods and skills that historians use to study and write about the past. Unlike most other history courses, this one does not focus on a specific geographic area or chronological period; instead, students will focus on the processes of and developing the skills for thinking historically, conducting historical research--including locating, utilizing, and evaluating sources--and articulating their findings precisely and concisely. Guidelines for proper citation and attribution and the conventions for historical writing are presented and discussed. Grappling with the past, thinking about what is history and how historians craft history are also components of the course. The brief introduction to historiography and historical theory serves to familiarize students with concepts and schools of thought explored more deeply in 4800-Theories & Methods courses and 4990: Senior Thesis Seminar.

  • Taught by Barbara Headle
  • Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:25 - 10:40 am
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3001

Explores the development and global interactions of cultures, particularly: West Africa, Europe, indigenous (First Nations) Americas, subcontinent Asia, East Africa, and the Middle East. Emphasizes the "core values" of selected traditions surviving and persisting in contemporary times.

  • Taught by Bernice Forrest
  • Online course
  • Approved for LAS Global Awareness Area requirement
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity)
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3120

Emergence, development and decline of Egyptian civilization from the late 4th to the late 1st millennium BCE. While students will concentrate on the three Kingdoms, special attention will also be given to the role of the Intermediate Periods in the transformation of Egyptian culture during the Hellenistic and Roman periods as well.

  • Taught by Roy Jo Sartin
  • Meets Wednesdays 4:45 - 7:20 pm
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3160

Examines how the history of contacts produced and affected contemporary understanding of Islam and the West. Considers cultural, trade, and diplomatic contact in different historical periods, and the way that contact is negotiated through gender, race, class, and religion.

  • Taught by Carole Woodall
  • Meets Thursdays 4:45 - 7:20 pm
  • Approved for LAS Global Awareness requirement
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3680
  • This course is cross-listed with WEST 

What do London, Paris, Chicago, St. Louis, New York City, an exotic dancer, an historian, a piano maker, a physicist, a serial killer, a garbage dump, the Ferris wheel, and the Eiffel Tower have in common? The World's Fair! What do Cream of Wheat, Aunt Jemima Pancake Mix, Wrigley Chewing Gum, Cracker Jacks, the hamburger, the zipper, and the automatic dishwasher have in common? They debuted at the 1893 World's Fair! In this course, we use the lens of World's Fairs to examine political, cultural, social, racial, gendered, economic, environmental, and artistic themes of 19th and 20th-century American history so that students develop a broader understanding of the emergence and development of modern America. Topics include, among others: World's Fairs as marketplaces of ideas and products; activism and imperialism; architecture and space; modernity and blight.

  • Taught by Barbara Headle
  • Meets Mondays 4:45 - 7:20 pm
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3780

Examination of important European films, film periods, and national or filmic styles from the first works after the Second World War until today. The dual focus of discussion and critical reflection will be on historical content but also formal, artistic qualities.

  • Taught by Robert Sackett
  • Spring Break course: Meets March 25 through April 2, 9 am - 1:45 pm
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 3960
  • This course is cross-listed with FILM

Students will be involved in community and organizational settings where they will gain practical work and networking experience. They will apply critical analysis as well as historical research methods to their sites for their academic component. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing. Instructor consent required.

This course explores the realities, expectations, and representations of women in medieval Europe (ca. 500-1500 CE) and helps prepare students for senior thesis through the analysis of primary source readings. Continues sequence beginning with HIST 1310, Women in Classical Antiquity.

  • Taught by Janet Myers
  • Meets Tuesdays 7:30 - 10:05 pm
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity)
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 4140

Intensive study on the causes and consequences of the Civil War, and the struggle over reconstruction. Course focuses on the period 1850-1877.

  • Taught by Amy Haines
  • Meets Mondays 7:30 - 10:05 pm
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity)
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 4530

An introduction to the history of mathematics and its creators. Traces the lives and works of the greatest mathematicians of all time. Explores birth and discovery of new ideas. Designed for math, math education, and history majors but may also be a valuable experience for science and art majors. 

  • Taught by Alexander Soifer
  • Meets Fridays 1:40 - 4:20 pm
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 4700
  • This course is cross-listed with ID

An objective examination of the military history of the United States from the colonial period to the present. Significant battles and campaigns are carefully analyzed, but equal attention is given to cause and effect relationships of America's wars in a national and global context.

  • Taught by Charles Dusch
  • Meets Tuesdays 4:45 - 7:20 pm
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 4790

A required course for the history degree. The focus is on research methods, organization of ideas, analysis of evidence, and writing history. Under the direction of a faculty member, each member of the seminar will prepare an original piece of research: the Senior Thesis.

  • Section 001: Taught by Janet Myers, meets Wednesdays 7:30 - 10:05 pm
  • Section 002: Taught by Christina Jimenez, meets Fridays 10:50 am - 1:30 pm
  • Section 003: Taught by Paul Harvey, meets Tuesdays 10:50 am - 1:30 pm
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Summit
  • Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive
  • Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status and 9 resident hours of upper division History courses
  • Upper-division undergraduate: HIST 4990
  • Taught by Yang Wei
  • Meets Tuesdays 7:30 - 10:05 pm
  • Graduate level: HIST 6690
  • Graduate status or permission of instructor required
  • Taught by Brian Duvick
  • Meets Thursdays 4:45 - 7:20 pm
  • Graduate level: HIST 6690
  • Graduate status or instructor permission required

Students will be involved in community and organizational settings where they will gain practical work and networking experience. They will apply critical analysis as well as historical research methods to their sites for their academic component. 

  • Directed by Christina Jimenez
  • Graduate level: HIST 6995
  • Fulfills "elective" component for MA degree

Research track, continuation of HIST 6690: Graduate Readings in Medieval Europe

  • Taught by Michael Martoccio
  • Meets Tuesdays 4:45 - 7:20 pm
  • Graduate level: HIST 7690
  • Graduate status or instructor permission required

Research track, continuation of HIST 6780: Graduate Readings in City and Citizenship

  • Taught by Christina Jimenez
  • Meets Tuesdays 4:45 - 7:20 pm
  • Graduate level: HIST 7690
  • Graduate status or instructor permission required
  • Requires Special Permission
 
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