Department of History

Undergraduate Upper-Division Courses

These courses are usually taught on a one-time basis. The subject matter will change from year to year and will cover an important but rarely taught subject in history. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity).

  • 3 Credits

Analysis of the philosophical views of women and by women in ancient Greek, Roman and Egyptian thought. Meets with PHIL 3140 and WEST 3140. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity).

  • 3 Credits

The Heller Center for Arts and Humanities supports interdisciplinary projects in the arts and humanities. It will be housed on the Hellers’ 34-acre ranch, built in the 1930s, just north of the main UCCS campus. The ranch is currently under rehabilitation. Student and faculty member will work together to determine exact course of individual internship. Topics may include: history of Dorothy and Larry Heller, history of the property, original historical research, archive development and research, art catalog, art restoration research, exhibition design, environmental research, historical exhibition installation, history of Colorado Springs. Prer., Junior or Senior standing and consent of instructor. ENGL 1310 or equivalent, and one upper-level history course with “B” grade or higher.

  • 1 Credits (Minimum) 6 Credits (Maximum)

Examines the life cycles of Europeans in the pre-industrial period (before c. 1750) through analysis of the theory and practice of procreation, child-rearing, marriage, and death.

  • 3 Credits

This course synthesizes theoretical and guided practical training in archival research and preservation methodologies and their relation to history as a field of study. UCCS collections are the laboratory in which students participate in compiling and conserving UCCS history. Prer., Junior/senior only.

  • 3 Credits

Explores the development and global interactions of cultures, particularly: West Africa, Europe, indigenous (First Nations) Americas, subcontinent Asia, East Africa, and the Middle East. Emphasizes the “core values” of selected traditions surviving and persisting in contemporary times.

  • 3 Credits

Surveys traditional China from the beginning of the civilization to 1800. Examines dynastic transitions, politics, cultural innovations, ideological debates, religions, economy, gender, and ethnicity. Reading and writing intensive.

  • 3 Credits

Emergence, development and decline of Mesopotamian civilizations from the early 3rd to the late 1st Millenium B.C.E. While students will concentrate on Sumerian and Akkadian history, they will gain a broad understanding of the development of Amorite, Kassite, Hurrian, Assyrian, Chaldaean and Babylonian culture as well.

  • 3 Credits

Emergence, development and decline of Egyptian civilization from the late 4th to the late 1st Millenium B.C.E. While students will concentrate on the three Kingdoms, special attention will also be given to the role of the Intermediate Periods in the transformation of Egyptian culture during the Hellenistic and Roman periods as well. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

History of ancient Greece from its emergence in the 2nd Millenium B.C. through the Archaic, Colonial, Classical and Hellenistic periods. The socio-political history of each period will be broadly analyzed to develop a balanced understanding of the interaction of such dynamic cultural influences as politics, religion, literature, and art.

  • 3 Credits

The emergence, development, and decline of the Roman civilization from the 2nd Millenium B.C.E. to the rise of Constantine in the 4th Century C.E.

  • 3 Credits

Development and decline of Athenian democracy from the early 6th to the late 4th century B.C.E. While students will trace the evolution of the Delian League from its origins through the emergence of the Athenian Empire, defeat in the Peloponnesian War and absorption by the Hellenistic Empire, special attention will be given to the development of the Athenian constitution and the principal socio-political institutions.

  • 3 Credits

Emergence, development and transformation of the Crusade movement from 1095 C.E. through the later Middle Ages. Special attention will be given to the first four Crusades, but students will also analyze primary and secondary sources on the expansion of crusading throughout the 13th century and the Eastern Crusades of the 14th-16th centuries.

  • 3 Credits

A comparative study of the Nazi Holocaust and other genocides. Several approaches to understanding and an explanation of genocidal violence will be used, including sources from disciplines apart from history. Approved for LAS Global Awareness requirement. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity); Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

n analysis of Nazi Germany’s policy of genocide against the Jews in the context of European fascism of the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s.

  • 3 Credits

n analysis of Germans and the Holocaust from several perspectives: the development of German anti-Semitism; the identity of German Jews; genocide as perpetrated by the Third Reich; subsequent efforts of atonement, commemoration.

  • 3 Credits

An examination of major developments of German politics, society, economic life and culture from the end of the Seven Years War to the Austro-Prussian War. Special attention to nationalism and the emergence of national literature.

  • 3 Credits

An examination of major developments of German politics, society, economic life and culture from the end the Austro-Prussian War to today. Inclusion of some German literature.

  • 3 Credits

An examination of the Nazi leader in terms of the historical situation in which he attained power, his historical significance generally, and his responsibility along with that of others for the policies of genocide.

  • 3 Credits

An analysis of German politics, economics, society, and culture since the end of World War II.

  • 3 Credits

20th century war, genocide, and oppression as represented by certain forms of art: film, literature, photography, visual arts. The issue is the distinctive contribution of artistic treatment to historical understanding.

  • 3 Credits

A survey of the early formation of the English nation, from the coming of the Anglo-Saxons to c. 1500. The focus will be on major economic, political and religious trends as seen through a variety of original sources.

  • 3 Credits

Traces the creation and maintenance of the Tudor state in the 16th century and its dismantlement during the revolutions of the 17th century. The emphasis will be on political, social, and economic structures as seen through a variety of original sources.

  • 3 Credits

Survey of early modern English history from 1688 to 1830 with an emphasis on political and economic developments and their impact on social structure.

  • 3 Credits

This course investigates early modern Europe in the context of scientific and religious changes and the development of new social identities (1400-1800 c.e.). Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Advanced Core; Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

Traces developments in Irish history since the 1100s, the century in which Ireland’s stormy relationship with Great Britain began. Special emphasis will be placed upon that relationship, but the course will also examine the various social groups that comprised Irish society and their relationships with each other. Irish culture in its many facets will be examined through the study of various works of literature interspersed throughout the course.

  • 3 Credits

A broad sketch of Chicano history since 1910. This course integrates events, ideas, and personalities from both sides of the border to illuminate the evolution of Spanish-speaking people of the American Southwest. Approved for LAS Cultural Diversity requirement. Meets with WEST 3510.

  • 3 Credits

Course covers the history of U.S. Latino communities and Latin American immigrants to the U.S. from the 1820s to the present. Approved for LAS Cultural Diversity requirement. Meets with WEST 3520.

  • 3 Credits

Historical analysis using primary and secondary texts of the religious culture of America from pre-Columbian era to the present. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity); Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

Explores the major trends of modern Mexican history, focusing on the Mexican Revolution, struggles to realize the “promises” of the revolution, crises of debt and destabilization, and the effects of NAFTA and the Zapatista uprising of the 1990s. Approved for LAS Global Awareness requirement. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity); Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

The history of immigrants/migrants from Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, and Europe as of 1840 to the present will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on U.S. immigration laws, the development of ethnic-based communities and connections to U.S. policy. Approved for LAS Cultural Diversity requirement. Meets with WEST 3580.

  • 3 Credits

Exploration of major themes in the history of Latin America such as conquest, colonialism, cultural clashes, revolution, and nationalism through the use of films and texts. Approved for LAS Global Awareness requirement. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity); Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

Examines the social, political and cultural changes arising in the turbulent years of the 1960s. Special attention will be given to the Civil Rights Movement, the domestic aspects of the Vietnam War, and challenges to traditional culture and values.

  • 3 Credits

American economic organization and institutions and their development from colonial times to the present. Prer., ECON 2020 or permission of instructor. Meets with ECON 3500.

  • 3 Credits

Examines how the history of contacts produced and affected contemporary understanding of Islam and the West. Considers cultural, trade, and diplomatic contact in different historical periods, and the way that contact is negotiated through gender, race, class, and religion. Approved for Global Awareness Requirement. Meets with WEST 3680.

  • Meets with GES 4620.
  • 3 Credits

A survey of the history of American women from the Colonial era through the Civil War, concentrating on the nineteenth century. It will introduce students to the changing economic, gender, and familial roles of American women. Meets with WEST 3710.

  • 3 Credits

Introduces students to the major political, social and cultural developments in the history of African Americans from 1619 through Reconstruction. Meets with WEST 3720. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity).

  • 3 Credits

Examines via biography/autobiography how North America impacts the perspective and reality of American Indian and African-American people(s), circa 1790-2000. Meets with WEST 3730. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity).

  • 3 Credits

Surveys the historical basis of socio-political thought in North America’s diasporic (African-American) communities. Meets with WEST 3740.

  • 3 Credits

Examination of the history of the American Welfare System, from its roots in English Poor Laws to the establishment of the current system in the 1930s, and the implications for future generations. Special attention paid to children’s and women’s experiences.

  • 3 Credits

American history is labor history. The emergence and growth of capitalism involved social, cultural, political, and economics processes that often resulted in conflict and violence as notions of race, ethnicity, gender, and citizenship changed the nature and meaning of work.

  • 3 Credits

How do Americans live, relax, and entertain themselves? The answer involves high culture but also popular culture. Over the course of the century, pop culture forces such as the rise of the auto, advertising, the sexual revolution, radio, TV, movies and music from jazz to rock have transformed modern American civilization.

  • 3 Credits

An examination of the critical developments taking place in the history of American education. The background of pressing issues and challenges facing modern education are covered along with examples of how education has been used to improve human conditions.

  • 3 Credits

A history of India that details the colonization of South Asia. Topics of special attention are British imperialism, rebellions against British control, and the Indian struggle for freedom and independence.

  • 3 Credits

A seminar tracing the evolution of the British Empire from its American roots, through its 19th century apex in Asia, Africa, and the West Indies, to its dissolution in the late 20th century.

  • 3 Credits

A seminar dealing with global environmental history, with particular emphasis being given to the environmental history of the American West.

  • 3 Credits

A survey of the war in Southeast Asia through the eyes of Hollywood. Major periods include France’s war with Vietnam, early American involvement, the war through Asian eyes (as portrayed in Hollywood), the soldiers’ war back home, and the fall of Vietnam.

  • 3 Credits

The study of European film in conjunction with major developments in 20th century European society, including war, genocide, and dictatorship. Focus is on both historical commentary and film form. Meets with FILM 3990.

  • 3 Credits

Students will be involved in community and organizational settings where they will gain practical work and networking experience. They will apply critical analysis as well as historical research methods to their sites for their academic component. Prer., Junior or Senior standing, consent of instructor required.

  • 3 Credits

First course in a two-semester sequence on the Ottoman Empire. Discusses the foundation of the Ottoman state in its regional context, administration, social and cultural life, and gender relations. Themes include the empire’s multi-ethnic and cultural nature, cultural sophistication, and its developing relations with Western Europe.

  • 3 Credits

Second course in a two-semester sequence on the Ottoman Empire. Examines the dynamics that shaped the late Ottoman Empire and the early Turkish Republic. Considers the aftermath of World War I, and the idea of historical ruptures and continuities through the lens of education, gender, history, and taste.

  • 3 Credits

Examines the connection between the harem and war zone by examining Ottoman, Egyptian, American, and British 19th and 20th century travel accounts, blogs, memoirs, and novels. Considers the ways in which these two zones differ or overlap over time and place, exploring the historical realities of colonialism, empire, nationalism, and modernity. Central themes include the imaginary, feminism, identity, dislocation, war, and urban encounters. Approved for LAS Global Awareness requirement. Meets with WEST 4050.

  • 3 Credits

Focuses on the historical dimension of gendered society (family, personal status, war, feminism, and colonialism) in the Middle East and the ways that transnational filmmakers navigate and narrate various issues through feature film and documentary forms. Approved for LAS Global Awareness requirement. Meets with WEST 4060.

  • 3 Credits

Scope of course: 3rd century through 10th century. Themes covered will be Christianization of the Roman Empire, the transformation of the Western Empire into European feudal kingdoms, and the survival of the Eastern Empire. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

Scope of the course: 11th century through the 13th century. Themes covered will be political, social, religious, and economic developments that shaped Medieval Europe into a unique civilization.

  • 3 Credits

This course on inter-cultural relations explores the interaction of Jewish, Islamic, and Christian communities during the medieval period (600-1500 c.e.). It investigates Egypt, Iberia and North Africa, the Holy Land and Byzantium, Sicily and the central Mediterranean, and Constantinople/Ottoman Turkey. Approved for LAS Global Awareness requirement. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity); Advanced Core; Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

This course explores the realities, expectations, and representations of women in medieval Europe (ca. 500-1500 CE) and helps prepare students for senior thesis through the analysis of primary source readings. Continues sequence beginning with HIST 3010, Women in Classical Antiquity. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity).

  • 3 Credits

This course investigates the scientific, technological, and the material cultural developments that were made possible by Christian and Islamic competition and cooperation during the Middle Ages (600-1500 c.e.) Approved for LAS Global Awareness requirement. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity); Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

This course on medieval Spain and North Africa explores the historical interaction of Jewish, Islamic, and Christian communities. In particular, it evaluates the cultural, religious, political, and economic relations of the three cultures from 600 to 1500 c.e. Approved for LAS Global Awareness requirement. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity); Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

A study of Greek historiography through the works of select primary sources. Special emphasis is given to authorial intention, audience reception and the influence of the ethnographic, epigraphic and poetic traditions on the development of the genre of Ancient History.

  • 3 Credits

An exploration of primitive Christianity through its immediate Judaic and Hellenistic roots, to include extended historical and literary discussion of the literature of the New Testament and an analysis of the historical Jesus.

  • 3 Credits

A history of the Christian church in the West from its acceptance as a legal religion in the 4th century to the eve of its breakup at the Reformation. The focus is especially on theological, organizational, and heretical developments.

  • 3 Credits

A survey of the major political, economic, and social developments in Western Europe from the early 14th through the early 16th century. Included will be the expansion of Europe, notably of Spain and Portugal.

  • 3 Credits

A survey of Europe from the early 16th century through the mid-17th century from Martin Luther through the Thirty Years War. Emphasis will be given to religious themes and their relation to politics, economics and society.

  • 3 Credits

Empires since the 15th century. Examination of their rise and expansion, decline and fall. Some consideration of future prospects.

  • 3 Credits

An examination of society, government, and culture in the 18th century, with special emphasis on enlightened views of religion and the world outside Europe.

  • 3 Credits

An advanced survey of 19th century European history, with primary themes of liberty and pursuit of empire. Covers revolutions of the period and disputes over liberty’s meaning, e.g., feminism and communism. Some attention to science and philosophy. The development of strong nation-states with a trend toward imperialism is traced.

  • 3 Credits

This course will investigate the Spanish and Portuguese kingdoms’ earliest encounters with the New World, Africa, and Asia, the formation of colonial settlements and governments, and the bi-directional flow of people and goods (1450-1750 c.e.) Approved for LAS Global Awareness requirement. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity); Advanced Core; Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

Europe’s relations with major portions of the world with focus on factors that contributed to Europe’s dominance over much of the world before the Age of Imperialism.

  • 3 Credits

This course examines superordinate and subordinate relations in the 19th and 20th centuries. This is a topical course that will cover issues such as the Holocaust and British Imperialism, as well as dictatorship and fascism.

  • 3 Credits

Study of the First World War in military aspects and in the context of political and social change in the states affected by the war. Special attention is given to changes in gender relations. The stimulus to nationalism will be considered. Some examples of artistic treatment of the war.

  • 3 Credits

An analysis of the major trends and developments of European politics, society, economics, and culture between the world wars.

  • 3 Credits

Close examination of the causes, effects, and consequences of the worldwide conflict of World War II from 1932-1948. A global survey of what has been called the “biggest event in world history.” Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity).

  • 3 Credits

The American Revolution: The Forging of the Union, 1763-1789

  • 3 Credits

Cemeteries are collective representations of shared beliefs and attitudes, and are evidence of how and why such attitudes change over time. This course examines U.S. history through the study of cemeteries.

  • 3 Credits

Intensive study of the causes and consequences of the Civil War, and the struggle over reconstruction. Course focuses on the period 1850 - 1877. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity).

  • 3 Credits

Intensive research seminar focusing on primary texts of recent American religions from Cold War Protestantism to New Age Buddhism.

  • 3 Credits

Examination of the social, economic, political, and cultural impact of wars on American society in the 20th century. Emphasis on World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War.

  • 3 Credits

A continuation of the study of the westward movement extended to the region beyond the Mississippi, beginning with the Spanish exploration and continuing through the end of the 19th century. Emphasis on the association of Western interests with those of a rapidly developing industrial society in the east.

  • 3 Credits

A history of Colorado from prehistoric Indians to nuclear projects. Topics covered will include exploration and conquest, the mountain men, settlement and pioneer life, Indians, mining, economic and political developments, exploitation and preservation of the environment, and recent trends.

  • 3 Credits

An introduction to the history of mathematics and its creators. Traces the lives and works of the greatest mathematicians of all time. Explores birth and discovery of new ideas. Designed for math, math education, and history majors but may also be a valuable experience for science and art majors. Prer., ID 1050. Meets with ID 4450 and I D 5450.

  • 3 Credits

Course will trace the social, political, economic, and cultural history of Asian Americans from the early settlements of the 19th century to the present. Meets with WEST 4710.

  • 3 Credits

Traces the historical origins of U.S. diplomatic, political, and fiscal relationships in Asia. Topics include the early “China trade,” the “Opening of Japan,” and aspects of American imperialism in East and Southeast Asia. Views U.S. foreign policy with an eye toward congressional and presidential decisions which resulted in American participation in three major wars in the Asian region.

  • 3 Credits

A history of China from archaeological origins through the Imperial Ages, the Mongol years to the final dynastic era - the Qing. Special attention focuses on early philosophic ideals, aspects of unity and disunity, as well as social, political and economic events. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity).

  • 3 Credits

An examination of the fall of the Imperial dynastic system and the rise of new political ideas of governance including republicanism and communism. Important topics include: the 1911 revolution, the warlord years, the creation of the nationalist and Communist parties, WWII in Asia and the rise and fall of Mao Zedong. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity).

  • 3 Credits

Included in this semester will be a study of Japan’s contact with the West, the Meiji Restoration and the creation of a modern nation, the expansion of the empire, and the rise of militarism and World War II. The course concludes with the postwar occupation and recovery of Japan. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity); Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

Course begins with the establishment of the first military feudal regime in 1185 and ends with the “Restoration” of imperial rule in 1868. Included is an examination of the political, cultural, economic, and social aspects of each of the three Shoguns that comprise the era of the Shoguns in Japan.

  • 3 Credits

A focus on the country, people and U.S. involvement. Guest speakers will supplement the lectures and give first-hand accounts of their participation in the war. ‘Vietnam’ will also define the role of American foreign policy during the Cold War. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

The countries of Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam in 19th and 20th centuries. Students will consider religious, social, economic and revolutionary trends prior to independence and then look at the problems of post-colonial independence from a regional point of view. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity); Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

An objective examination of the military history of the United States from the colonial period to the present. Significant battles and campaigns are carefully analyzed, but equal attention is given to cause and effect relationships of America’s wars in a national and global context.

  • 3 Credits

Seminar discussions and presentations emphasizing research skills and methods in history. Students should take prior to or along with Senior Thesis Seminar, HIST 4990.

  • 3 Credits

Covers the discovery and settlement of the American West, and also documents the displacement of Native Americans during the period of 1800-1910. The course will be presented from two points of view, historical and ethnographical. Historical lectures will includes citations from diaries, journals, and primary sources. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

An examination of the discipline of history, including methods and theory. Close reading of representative historians, with exercises in historical writing and research. Prer., Junior or Senior only, or permission of instructor.

  • 3 Credits

Examines the French and American war in Vietnam, 1945-1973, with an emphasis on historiography and the use of primary documents and popular literature to evaluate the Vietnamese struggle for independence.

  • 3 Credits

Research-intensive seminar focusing on American history 1929-1945. Students will prepare a significant research project in this area. Prer., Juniors and Seniors only or permission of instructor. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirement: Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

An in-depth study of the historian’s craft, using modern Indian history as the vehicle for understanding various methods of research. Prer., Junior or Senior status or permission of instructor.

  • 3 Credits

This seminar emphasizes the history of genealogy, its methodology and its relation to history as a field of study. Objectives include preparation for Senior Thesis. Students will learn to familiarize themselves with sources, methods of research, writing, and citation. Requisites: Junior/Senior standing only.

  • 3 Credits

This course explores the majors trends of Mexico and the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands from encounters and conquest to the present day challenges of immigration, NAFTA, and the unique borderland identity. This research seminar aims to prepare History majors for the final Senior Thesis capstone. Students will thus engage in primary source research on a specific topic. No Spanish language required. Approved for LAS Global Awareness requirement.

  • 3 Credits

Research-focused course on the long history (18th century to present) of civil rights in American History, including issues of race and gender equality. Prer., Juniors and Seniors only or permission of instructor. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Inclusiveness (Global/Diversity); Writing Intensive.

  • 3 Credits

A required course for the history degree. The focus is on research methods, organization of ideas, analysis of evidence, and writing history. Under the direction of a faculty member, each member of the seminar will prepare an original piece of research: the Senior thesis. Approved for Compass Curriculum requirements: Capstone Experience; Writing Intensive. Prer., Junior or Senior status and 9 resident hours of upper division History courses.

  • 3 Credits
 
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