Course Descriptions

+ Lower Level Courses

+ GES 1000-4. Environmental Systems: Climate and Vegetation.

A general introduction to energy and mass budgets, including atmospheric motion, solar radiation, and water budgets. Includes consideration of climatic elements as they interact with vegetation, animals, and humans in ecosystems. This class is taught in a variety of learning situations, including lecture, laboratory, Web-based and tutorials. Approved for LAS Natural Science area requirement.

+ GES 1010-4. Environmental Systems: Landforms and Soils

An introductory survey primarily concerned with the agents and processes of landform shaping and soil genesis. Major emphasis is on the genesis, distribution, and utility of surface features in a variety of learning situations, including lecture, Web-based, laboratory, tutorials, and field trips. Approved for LAS Natural Science area requirement.

+ GES 1050-4. Introduction to Map and Compass

A basic introduction to topographic maps will be given. This will include the process involved with making and field checking maps; discussion of symbolization, scale, and landform representation. The development of the compass will be outlined and basic skills will be taught. Approved for LAS Natural Science area requirement.

+ GES 1980-4. World Regional Geography

A survey of world regions that explores the diversity of human culture within the wider global context. This issues-oriented class examines the cultural, political, economic and environmental forces that shape each region and the impacts of globalization on our increasingly interconnected world. Approved for LAS Social Science and Global Awareness requirements.

+ GES 1990-4. Introduction to Human Geography

A systematic introduction to the broad field of human-land interactions and spatial order. Emphasis is placed on the major themes of geographic inquiry including population numbers and distribution, changing resource use, location decisions, settlements, transportation, political units, and a geography of the future. Approved for LAS Social Science and Global Awareness requirements.

+ GES 2050-3. Digital Earth

Digital Earth is a concept that seeks to provide digital information about the Earth to people around the world. This information provides the basis for understanding the world better, addressing world problems, and making sound decisions. Digital Earth is a computer-mediated instructional course that includes both lectures and demonstrations of several geospatial technologies and their applications. Students are expected to develop knowledge of these technologies including their applications and potential impact on society and vice versa.

+ GES 2980-1 to 6. Professional Experience I

Designed experiences involving application of specific, relevant concepts and skills in supervised employment situations.

+ Upper Level Courses

+ GES 3050-4. Introduction to Cartography I

An introduction to the principles and theory of map-making. The emphasis will be on the design of maps for research and publication using advanced computer hardware and software. The course entails the creation of reproducible, thematic maps using the various computer techniques available to the cartographer.

+ GES 3070-3. Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa

The overarching purpose of this course is to introduce students to the diverse physical and social geographies of Sub‐Saharan Africa. Rather than exploring individual countries the course is designed around themes which relate to a number of Sub‐Saharan African countries and ultimately to connections amongst these countries and the rest of the world. The themes of the course will be introduced and examined using a combination of lectures, videos, readings, in-class current event discussions, and guest presentations. Though Africa is often presented and thought of as a continent of strife and disaster, this course aims to move beyond such superficial representations of Africa and present Sub‐Saharan Africa as an incredibly diverse place, with awe inspiring physical and cultural geographies, which has and continues to play an integral part in global social and economic interactions. Students will be introduced to the rich and dynamic geographies of Sub‐Saharan Africa, and will consider the current and potential role that Africa plays on the global scale. Though welcomed, no prior knowledge or experience is required for this course.

+ GES 3160-3. Geographic Education

Geographic Education explores approaches to teaching geography in K-12 education. This course includes the discussion of important geographic concepts and their integration into the classroom. Possible topics may include, but not be limited to: childhood geographies, learning landscapes, geographic standards, place based education and new geographic technologies.

+ GES 3170-4. Saving Place

This course examines the basic theories, concepts and people within the sustainability movements and bioregionalism. Through critical readings, group projects, fieldtrips and applied research, students will apply ideas and techniques learned to real world case studies.

+ GES 3200-4. Practical Meteorology

An introduction to weather elements and meteorological phenomena with emphasis on physical principles and practical applications. Includes weather elements, air masses, clouds, precipitation, storms and other weather systems, weather map analysis, forecasting, weather control and modification, and current developments in the field of meteorology. Local and current weather facilities will be used to relate meteorological principles to actual observations. Approved for LAS Natural Science area requirement. Meets with ENSC 3200.

+ GES 3250-3. The Geography of Climate Change

Students investigate the theory and evidence of climate change from a geographical perspective. The course incorporates the interactions and interrelationships of humans and the environmental system while in the study of global environmental changes in different locations. Students use readings, lectures, discussion, research, computer simulation, and their own critical and analytical thinking skills in the process of forming their own conclusions about the status of climate change in different locations. Written and oral presentation skills will be enhanced as the students present and defend their theory and findings to their peers. Approved for LAS Natural Science area requirement.

+ GES 3400-3. Geopolitics

Addresses the causes and consequences of global conflict and power distribution from a geographic perspective. Geopolitics looks at how geographic factors such as culture, language, religion, climate, topography, and size influence a state’s population and power capabilities.

+ GES 3500-3. Nature and Society

The relationship between nature and society is one of the pillars of geographic inquiry. This course surveys the relationship between nature and society by examining topics including population, energy, conservation, agriculture, and pollution in the context of geographical studies. Prer., GES 1000 or GES 1010 or consent of instructor.

+ GES 3600-3. Geography of American Folk and Ethnic Music

Music is ubiquitous in America today. This course will analyze the geographic context of American folk and ethnic music. A variety of geographic concepts and their relationship to the development of American folk and ethnic music will be discussed.

+ GES 3660-3. Community Service: Theory and Practice

Combines theory with practical application; includes reading assignments, seminars, and community service. Prer., Sophomore standing and consent of instructor.

+ GES 3700-3. Cultural Geography

Cultural Geography explores the themes, methodologies and historical development of the sub-discipline of Cultural Geography. These themes may include, but not be limited to: definitions of culture, the Spatial Turn within contemporary cultural studies, food, music and cultural landscapes.

+ GES 3750-4. Conservation Biology

The major focus is the application of biological and ecological principles to preserve biodiversity. Ultimate sources and current worldwide losses of biological diversity are emphasized. Because conservation biology demands multidisciplinary approaches, historical, legal, economic, and ethical issues are also included. Prer., BIOL 1150, BIOL 3700 recommended. Consent of instructor required. Meets with BIOL 3750 and BIOL 5700.

+ GES 3800-3. Regional Geography of the Pikes Peak Areay

A regional rather than synoptic approach is taken to the study of two formal regions: the Great Plains and the southern Rocky Mountains, and an informal region to include Colorado Springs, Cripple Creek and the nearby western High Plains.

+ GES 3820-3. Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean

Study of culture and society, and human relationship to the physical environment of Mexico, the Central American countries, and the Caribbean islands.

+ GES 3850-3. Historical Geography of the United States

Historical geography as a method for study of changing and evolving landscapes.

+ GES 3860-3. Geography of American’s Southwest

Examines the physical and cultural environment of the American Southwest. Includes an analysis of landforms, vegetation, climate, prehistoric cultures, modern native American peoples, Hispanic settlement, and modern demographic and social changes.

+ GES 3900-3. Historical Geography of the British Isles

Traces the historical evolution of the British landscape from prehistoric times to the present day. Particular regions like Wales, Yorkshire, the Lake District and Western Ireland will be examined in detail.

+ GES 3980-4. Places and Faces: Geographic Issues in Film

This advanced world regional course uses contemporary film as a vehicle to explore current global geographic issues. It examines cultural, political and economic issues that shape societies, focusing on marginalized ethnic and racial groups, women and the economically disadvantaged. Prer., GES 1980

+ GES 4000-4. Statistical Analysis in Geography

The application of statistical and other quantitative techniques to geographically organized data, areal distributions, and the solution of geographic research problems. Meets with GES 5000

+ GES 4020-3. Qualitative Methods in Geography

Students in this activity-focused course engage an array of qualitative methods to understand how certain methodologies can address research questions effectively. The course is designed to develop research skills and put a variety of qualitative methods to use in order to assess their specific strengths and shortcomings. Qualitative methods are particularly important for research that addresses the meaning or nature of experiences, including political processes, economic and social relationships, emotions, and natural or social phenomena.

+ GES 4050-4. Introduction to GIS

An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as a research tool. Students will use ESRI software to complete a series of geographic projects. A basic understanding of cartography and computer use is expected. Prer., GES 2050 or 3050 or instructor consent. Meets with GES 5050.

+ GES 4060-4. Introduction to Remote Sensing

This course addresses the basic principles of image interpretation and analysis and introduces considerations central to the acquisition and interpretation aerial photography and satellite imagery. Additionally students are introduced to the range of remotely sensed data products available and explore the benefits and limitations of using remotely sensed data. Lectures are complimented by lab components which are designed to introduce students to basic image analysis techniques. Meets with ENSC 4060 and GES 5060.

+ GES 4070-4. Geovisualization

Students will learn the principles, concepts, methods, and applications of geovisualization. Students will have hands-on experience in using highly interactive, dynamic, and multidimensional geovisualization systems that offer high levels of user experience. Prer., GES 2050.

+ GES 4080-4. Advanced Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Continued application of GIS for spatial analysis. Focuses on ESRI software and complete original research projects. Prer., GES 4050 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 5080.

+ GES 4090-4. Image Processing

This course is an introduction to the advanced methods of environmental and natural resource data analysis using remotely sensed imagery. Emphasis will be placed on digital image analysis of freely available data sources. This is a project-oriented course in which students will work through the remote sensing process in entirety - from the design of a research question to presentation of results. No previous programming experience required. Prer., GES 4060. Meets with ENSC 4090 and GES 5090.

+ GES 4100-3. Global Positioning System with GIS

Explores the theory of GPS, provide practical experience using GPS units, and explore the interaction between GIS and GPS through use of ESRI, and Trimble Pathfinder software. Prer., GES 3050, GES 2050, or instructor consent. GES 4050 is preferred. Meets with GES 5100.

+ GES 4110-4. Introduction to Field Techniques

A field based course that demonstrates the multiple techniques used by geographers for data gathering and analysis. These techniques will include elementary surveying, GPS, hydrologic and landform measurements, map and compass use, dendrochronology analysis, and cultural/ economic land use mapping. Extended field trip(s) required.

+ GES 4120-4. Internet Geographic Information Systems

Students will learn the fundamentals of Internet GIS technology and develop hands-on experience in implementing Internet mapping applications using various tools including ESRI’s ArcGIS for Server and Google Maps. Prer., Introduction to GIS (GIS 4050/5050). Meets with GES 5120.

+ GES 4130-4. Programming GIS

The fundamental concepts of customizing and programming GIS. Students will develop hands-on experience in creating custom and more usable GIS applications using various tools including ESN’s Arcgis and Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications. Prer., Introduction to GIS (GIS 4050/5050). Meets with GES 5130.

+ GES 4160-1 to 4. Teaching Geography

Practicum and/or tutorial, by special arrangement only, in the teaching of geography (for example, serving as small group leaders or proctors in introductory courses, or developing and/or testing curriculum materials).

+ GES 4170-4. Writing Place

Provides opportunities for student-instructor interaction aiming to improve geographic writing skills.

+ GES 4220-3. Synoptic Climatology

The physical processes involved with the development and transportation of weather systems. Selected topics include relationships between upper atmospheric flow and surface weather phenomena, synoptic evaluation of air masses and techniques for environmental analysis. Prer., GES 1000. Meets with GES 5220.

+ GES 4260-4. Biogeography

An examination of the distribution of life on the Earth’s surface. The relationship between environmental factors and plant and animal distributions will be the central theme. Changes in distributions through time will also be examined. Required field trip. Prer., GES 1000 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 5260.

+ GES 4270-4. Advanced Biogeography

A project-oriented class with students studying the distribution of plants as related to environmental factors. This class will combine lecture, fieldwork, and data processing, resulting in maps and reports. The geographical area of study will be changed each time. Prer., GES 4260/GES 5260 or instructor consent. Meets with GES 5270.

+ GES 4280-4. Plant Communities of the Western United States

An examination of plant assemblages in the contiguous United States west of the one-hundredth meridian. The distribution of major plant species will be used to illustrate plant community interactions with environmental factors such as climate and landforms. Prer., GES 4260/GES 5260. Meets with GES 5280.

+ GES 4290-4. Plant Communities of Colorado

An examination of plant assemblages in Colorado. Major plant communities will be examined in the context of environmental factors such as climate and land forms. Required field trip. Prer., GES 426 or consent of instructor. Meets with BIOL 4290 and GES 5290.

+ GES 4310-4. Principles of Geomorphology

Systematic study of rock weathering, mass wasting, fluvial, glacial, and aeolian processes and the landforms resulting from these processes. Climatic geomorphology, geomorphometry, and data collection technologies (e.g., lidar) are emphasized. Prer., GES 1010, GEOL 1010, or consent of instructor. Field trips required. Meets with GES 5310, GEOL 4630, GEOL 5630.

+ GES 4320-3. Mountain Environmental Systems

Field course emphasizing study of landforms produced by weathering and soils, mass movement, erosional processes under all climatic and altitudinal conditions. Includes Front Range glacial geology and glaciology. Prer., GES 1000 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 5320

+ GES 4340-4. Soils

Covers the nature and distribution of soils through an investigation of the basics of soil genesis and development. It will stress the environmental components involved in soil production and the geographic distribution of soil types. Prer., GES 1010 or GEOL 1010 or instructor consent. Meets with GES 5340.

+ GES 4410-3. Resource Management and Conservation

Inventory, policy, and management of natural resources. Nature, significance, distribution, and problems associated with water, forest, wildlife, soils, and recreational resources. Emphasis is on experience in the United States, but other global problems may be included. Meets with GES 5410

+ GES 4420-3. Conservation and United States Public Lands

Examines the legacy of public lands in the U.S. and whether management policies have evolved from an emphasis on resource extraction to one focused upon conservation. Topics will include national parks, forests, recreation, and wildlife conservation. Meets with GES 5420.

+ GES 4450-3. Analysis of Environmental Systems

An analysis of the various factors involved in the routing of environmental impact statements. Emphasis will be on analytical procedures associated with the evaluation of environmental systems and applications specific environmental impact problems. Meets with GES 5450.

+ GES 4460-1 to 6. Field Studies in Geography

Field investigations focused on a specific aspect of the landscape in a selected area. Topic and credit vary from year to year. Field trips required. meets with GES 5170.

+ GES 4480-3. Environmental Problems of Colorado

A discussion and investigation of the environmental problems of the State of Colorado with an emphasis on land planning and land use, pollution, transportation, energy, and hazards. Programs to alleviate as well as to minimize any further related environmental problems will be developed. Meets with GES 5480.

+ GES 4500-3. Water Resources and Water Problems

A descriptive interpretation and detailed inventory of hydroclimatic data, surface water, and ground water. The use of water is critically evaluated with emphasis on problems associated with geographic maldistribution, appropriation, irrigation, industry, pollution, and regional development. Meets with GES 5500.

+ GES 4510-3. Applied Hydrology

 Exploration of the principles of hydrology and their application to environmental investigations. Prer., GES 1000 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 5510.

+ GES 4550-3. Disasters and Society

Case studies of slow and quick developing disasters will be discussed in a local, national, cross-cultural, and global framework. Issues covered will include technological hazards, the role of environmental perception, risk-taking, decision-making and the impact legislative changes at the local, state, and national levels. Meets with GES 5550.

+ GES 4560-3. Cultural and Political Ecology

A review of historical and contemporary environment-society studies in the field of geography. Topics include environmental narratives, population, food security, nature, and sustainable development across a range of geographical contexts. Prer., GES 1000 or GES 1010 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 5560.

+ GES 4570-3. Militarization, Environment, and Society

This course considers how military activities and broader processes of militarization shape and influence cultural and physical landscapes. Extending from traditional considerations of military geography, we take an extended critical look at militarism at home and abroad, and during times of war and peace.

+ GES 4600-3. The Cultural Landscape

 Students will learn to interpret the American cultural landscape, particularly everyday surroundings that they frequently take for granted. We will emphasize how culture shapes the world around us, from modifications to the natural terrain to the cities in which we live. Meets with GES 5600.

+ GES 4610-3. Urban Geography

Course addresses topics in urban location, urban morphology and design, urban function, and urban social issues. We analyze why cities look as they do and the role cities play in society. Emphasis is on cities in the United States. Meets with GES 5610.

+ GES 4620-3. Race, Ethnicity, and Place.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a geographical perspective concerning the dynamics and processes of racialization in varying U.S. urban contexts. In essence, the course maps the dynamic relationship between social relationships and the built environment. Meets with EST 3620.

+ GES 4640-3. MegaCities

This seminar provides a global perspective on the nature of urbanization, the forces behind these patterns, and resulting effects on social, political, economic, and environmental organization and governance of the world’s largest mega-cities (a total population of 10 million+ people)..

+ GES 4650-4. Restoration Geographies

Students learn about ecological restoration, landscapes of restoration, and the environmental, economic, ethical, and practical implications of restoration efforts. The course emphasizes case studies, direct involvement in restoration projects, and in-class field trips.

+ GES 4680-4. Inequality USA

This course identifies how inequality is defined, measured, studied and understood by geographers. Students will analyze quantitative and qualitative data sources to explain inequality in the US, and will conduct research which will identify spaces of inequality in Colorado Springs. Meets with WEST 4630 and SOC 4630.

+ GES 4700-1 to 4. Geographic Issues

Geographic perspectives or dimensions of selected areas such as pollution, poverty, world conflict, natural hazards, landscape perception or women’s communities will be presented. Topics vary from year to year.

+ GES 4730-3. Geography of Population

National and social patterns of population distribution; organization of populations; and methods of census, demographic analysis and mapping. Meets with GES 5730.

+ GES 4750-3. Recreation, Tourism, and the Environment

An inquiry into the spatial distribution and environmental/cultural impacts of recreation and tourism, including international tourism. Recreational values, cultural norms and change, economic tradeoffs, and future trends are included. Meets with GES 5750.

+ GES 4760-3. Women’s Space, Women’s Place: Women’s Role in Changing the Face of the Earth.

A re-examination of traditional aspects of cultural and regional geography from a feminist perspective. Understanding the full richness of the human experience in utilizing earth as habitat requires a conscious effort to explore the omissions about where, how, and why women live, work, migrate, perceive their environment, and generally contribute to the intricate mosaic of spatial organization. The geographical origins and distributions of differing roles of women in a number of societies are also explored. Meets with WMST 4760.

+ GES 4770-3. Development of Geographic Thought

The course will focus upon discussions and studies of the development of geographic thought and philosophies. Both past and present literature will be appraised with particular emphasis placed upon the themes and topics significant to the growth of modern geographic philosophy. Prer., GES 1990 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 5770.

+ GES 4780-3. Global Migration

This seminar provides a global perspective on the nature of migration, the forces behind these patterns, and their effects in sending and receiving societies. Each participant will delve into several literatures, lead weekly sessions, and introduce perspectives on international migration.

+ GES 4800-1. Sustainability Seminar

The Capstone course for the Sustainable Development Minor is a research symposium open only to seniors in the minor to present original, independent work revised/expanded from research done in the context of one of the courses taken to fulfill the minor.

+ GES 4910-3. The World of Wines and Vines

Focus on the physical and cultural geography of the world’s grape-producing regions. Coverage will include the study of terrain, soils, climate, and other aspects of physical geography; the historical geography of viticulture; the procedures and processes associated with growing grapes and making wines; and a detailed analysis of specific regions such as the Bordeaux area, the Napa Valley, and German wine regions. Prer., Must be 21 years of age.

+ GES 4920-3. Geography of Food

Addresses four geographical topics of food: 1) The political economy of food production; 2) food production and the environment; 3) food and cultures; and, 4) food and nutrition. Students will better appreciate our complex relationship with food. Meets with GES 5920.

+ GES 4940-4. Seminar: Practicum in Image Processing

Prer., GES 4050 or GES 4090 and consent of instructor required.

+ GES 4970-3. Honors in Geography

Independent research and thesis for geography majors who have maintained a superior scholastic performance in their overall program and within the department of geography and environmental studies. For superior students who wish to attain honors in the field of geography. May be taken in lieu of GES 4990.

+ GES 4980-1 to 12. Professional Experience II

Designed experiences involving application of specific, relevant concepts and skills in supervised employment situations.

+ GES 4990-3. Senior Thesis

A one semester research project. The student will write a formal research paper drawing on primary sources and pertinent secondary material. The student will work under the direction of a full time member of the department and have a second member as an additional reader.

+ Graduate Level Courses

+ GES 5000-4. Quantitative Methods

Research-oriented quantitative methods seminar. Advanced data analysis techniques for use in geographic and environmental research. Meets with GES 4000.

+ GES 5010-3. Seminar: Geographic Research

An analysis of research topics and methodologies in geography. Students will define a research topic, review literature in their field of interest, and prepare a research proposal. Prer., BA or BS.

+ GES 5020-3. Qualitative Methods in Geography

Students in this activity-focused course engage an array of qualitative methods to understand how certain methodologies can address research questions effectively. The course is designed to develop research skills and put a variety of qualitative methods to use in order to assess their specific strengths and shortcomings. Qualitative methods are particularly important for research that addresses the meaning or nature of experiences, including political processes, economic and social relationships, emotions, and natural or social phenomena.

+ GES 5050-4. Introduction to GIS for Graduate Students

GIS as a research tool. Students will use ESRI software to complete a series of geographic projects and pursue the application of GIS to their own research areas. Prer., GES 2050, GES 3050 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 4050.

+ GES 5060-4. Seminar: Advanced Remote Sensing

This course introduces the basic principles of image interpretation and analysis. Through lab and project work students will explore a variety of data sources and examine the methodological and logistical considerations central to the acquisition and interpretation aerial photography and digital imagery. Meets with ENSC 4060.

+ GES 5070-4. Geovisualization

Students will learn the principles, concepts, methods, and applications of geovisualization. Students will have hands-on experience in using highly interactive, dynamic, and multidimensional geovisualization systems that offer high levels of user experience. Prer., GES 2050.

+ GES 5080-4. Advanced GIS for Graduate Students

Continued application of GIS for spatial analysis. Students will learn ESRI software and complete original research projects in their field of interest. Prer., GES 4050, GES 5050 or instructor consent. Meets with GES 4080.

+ GES 5090-4. Image Processing

This course is an introduction to the advanced methods of environmental and natural resource data analysis using remotely sensed imagery. Emphasis will be placed on digital image analysis of freely available data sources. This is a project-oriented course in which students will work through the remote sensing process in entirety - from the design of a research question to presentation of results. No previous programming experience required. Prer., GES 4060. Meets with ENSC 4090.

+ GES 5100-3. Global Positioning System with GIS

Explores the theory of GPS, provide practical experience using GPS units, and explore the interaction between GIS and GPS through use of ESRI, and Trimble Pathfinder software. Prer., GES 2050, GES 3050, or instructor consent. GES 4050 is preferred. Meets with GES 4100.

+ GES 5120-4. Internet Geographic Information Systems

Students will learn the fundamentals of Internet GIS technology and develop hands-on experience in implementing Internet mapping applications using various tools including ESRI’s ArcGIS for Server and Google Maps. Prer., Introduction to GIS (GIS 4050/5050). Meets with GES 4120.

+ GES 5150-2 to 4. Graduate Teaching Geography

Practicum and/or tutorial, by special arrangement only, in the teaching of geography (for example, serving as small-group leaders or proctors in introductory courses, or developing and/or testing curriculum materials). Students work closely with faculty in developing new instructional materials and interact with students using those materials. Open to graduate students only.

+ GES 5130-4. Programming GIS

The fundamental concepts of customizing and programming GIS. Students will develop hands-on experience in creating custom and more usable GIS applications using various tools including ESN’s Arcgis and Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications. Prer., Introduction to GIS (GIS 4050/5050). Meets with GES 4130.

+ GES 5160-4. Workshop in Geographic Education

A course outlining methods of teaching geography in K-12. Includes discussion of important geographic concepts and their integration into the classroom. Students will develop teaching activities and materials for incorporation into their curriculum. Prer., consent of instructor.

+ GES 5170-2 to 4. Seminar: Research Methods

Intensive work in using various forms of data and field investigation for analysis of geographic problems. Case studies and field experience. meets with GES 446

+ GES 5220-3. Synoptic Climatology

The physical processes involved with the development and transportation of weather systems. Selected topics include relationships between upper atmospheric flow and surface weather phenomena, synoptic evaluation of air masses and techniques for environmental analysis. Prer., GES 1000. Meets with GES 4220.

+ GES 5260-4. Biogeography

An examination of the distribution of life on the Earth’s surface. The relationship between environmental factors and plant and animal distributions will be the central theme. Changes in distributions through time will also be examined. Required field trip. Prer., GES 1000 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 4260.

+ GES 5270-4. Advanced Biogeography

A project-oriented class with students studying the distribution of plants as related to environmental factors. This class will combine lecture, field work, and data processing; resulting in maps and reports. Prer., GES 4260, GES 5260 or instructor consent. Meets with GES 4270.

+ GES 5280-4. Plant Communities of the Western United States

An examination of plant assemblages in the contiguous United States west of the one-hundredth meridian. The distribution of major plant species will be used to illustrate plant community interactions with environmental factors such as climate and landforms. Prer., GES 4260/GES 5260. Meets with GES 4280.

+ GES 5290-4. Plant Communities of Colorado

An examination of plant assemblages in Colorado. Major plant communities will be examined in the context of environmental factors such as climate and land forms. Required field trip. Prer., GES 4260, GES 5260 or instructor consent. Meets with GES 4290 and BIOL 4290.

+ GES 5310-4. Topics in Geomorphology

Current research in landform processes. Focus on the western United States. Field projects, trips required. Prer. GEOL 1010, GES 1010 or instructor consent. Meets with GES 4310, GEOL 4630, GEOL 5630.

+ GES 5320-3. Mountain Environmental Systems Seminar.

Same as GES 4320 but includes additional research work. Field trips optional. Prer., GES 1000 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 4320.

+ GES 5340-4. Seminar: Soils

In-depth study of techniques used in analyzing soil classification systems for global soils. Problems in human use and misuse of soils. Prer., GES 1010, GEOL 1010, or instructor consent. Chemistry recommended. Meets with GES 4340.

+ GES 5390-3. Earth Systems Science

This course for middle and high school teachers will include field work, utilizing terrain and geological formations to compare and contrast earth with other planets. This course does not satisfy any requirements for the GES Master of Applied Geography Degree or the Master of Sciences. Meets with CURR 5540.

+ GES 5410-3. Seminar in Resource Management and Conservation

An investigation of environmental problems with emphasis on land-planning and land use, pollution, water, energy and natural hazards. Prer., Consent of instructor. Meets with GES 4410.

+ GES 5420-3. Conservation and United States Public Lands

Examines the legacy of public lands in the U.S. and whether management policies have evolved from an emphasis on resource extraction to one focused upon conservation. Topics will include national parks, forests, recreation, and wildlife conservation. Meets with GES 4420.

+ GES 5450-3. Seminar: Analysis of Environmental Systems

Problems associated with development of environmental impact studies. Case examples and field work. Meets with GES 4450.

+ GES 5480-3. Environmental Problems of Colorado

Specific land and resource use problems in Colorado. In-depth analysis of interacting systems of natural resources and human decision-making processes. Meets with GES 4480.

+ GES 5500-3. Topics in Water Resource Management

Experience of water resource management in the United States, prospects for the future and problem solving techniques. Critical analysis of issues important in the western United States. Meets with GES 4500.

+ GES 5510-3. Applied Hydrology

Exploration of the principles of hydrology and their applications to environmental investigations. Meets with GES 4510.

+ GES 5550-3. Disasters and Society

he impact of extreme geophysical events on human society. Emphasis upon adaptations to extreme events and ways of reducing vulnerability and damage. Meets with GES 4550.

+ GES 5560-3. Cultural and Political Ecology

A review of historical and contemporary environment-society studies in the field of geography. Topics include environmental narratives, population, food security, nature, and sustainable development across a range of geographical contexts. Prer., GES 1000 or GES 1010 or consent of instructor. Meets with GES 4560.

+ GES 5570-3. Militarization, Environment, and Society

his course considers how military activities and broader processes of militarization shape and influence cultural and physical landscapes. Extending from traditional considerations of military geography, we take an extended critical look at militarism at home and abroad, and during times of war and peace.

+ GES 5600-3. The Cultural Landscape

Students will learn to interpret the American cultural landscape, particularly everyday surroundings that they frequently take for granted. You will see clues about our culture and society from modifications to the natural terrain, including the cities in which we live. Meets with GES 4600.

+ GES 5610-3. Urban Geography

Course addresses topics in urban location, urban morphology and design, urban function, and urban social issues. We analyze why cities look as they do and the role cities play in society. Emphasis is on cities in the United States. Meets with GES 4610.

+ GES 5620-3. Race, Ethnicity, and Place

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a geographical perspective concerning the dynamics and processes of racialization in varying U.S. urban contexts. In essence, the course maps the dynamic relationship between social relationships and the built environment. Meets with EST 3620.

+ GES 5640-3. MegaCities

This seminar provides a global perspective on the nature of urbanization, the forces behind these patterns, and resulting effects on social, political, economic, and environmental organization and governance of the world’s largest mega-cities (a total population of 10 million+ people).

+ GES 5650-4. Restoration Geographies

Students learn about ecological restoration, landscapes of restoration, and the environmental, economic, ethical, and practical implications of restoration efforts. The course emphasizes case studies, direct involvement in restoration projects, and in-class field trips.

+ GES 5680-4. Inequality USA

This course identifies how inequality is defined, measured, studied and understood by geographers. Students will analyze quantitative and qualitative data sources to explain inequality in the US, and will conduct research which will identify spaces of inequality in Colorado Springs. Meets with WEST 4630 and SOC 4630.

+ GES 5730-3. Seminar: Population Geography

The geographic aspects of population characteristics including fertility, mortality, migration, distribution, and composition. Both theoretical and empirical considerations are included. Meets with GES 4730.

+ GES 5750-3. Seminar: Recreation Geography

An inquiry into the spatial distribution and environmental conditions of recreation. Emphasis is on outdoor recreation in nonurban settings. The implications of recreational values to resource managers and land use decisions will be included. Meets with GES 4750.

+ GES 5770-3. History and Nature of Geography

A history of geographical ideas from Greek classical efforts through the 19th century. Prer., Consent of instructor. Meets with GES 4770.

+ GES 5780-3. Global Migration

This seminar provides a global perspective on the nature of migration, the forces behind these patterns, and their effects in sending and receiving societies. Each participant will delve into several literatures, lead weekly sessions, and introduce perspectives on international migration.

+ GES 5920-3. Geography of Food.

Addresses four geographical topics of food: 1) The political economy of food production; 2) food production and the environment; 3) food and cultures; and, 4) food and nutrition. Students will better appreciate our complex relationship with food. Meets with GES 4920.

+ GES 6020-4. Data Processing in Earth Science

Advanced data processing using digital image models and Geographic Information Systems. Students will be responsible for extensive individual project design and completion. Prer., GES 5170 or GES 4090/GES 5090.

+ GES 7000-1 to 6. Master’s Thesis

No Description

+ GES 9400-1 to 4. Independent Study in Geography. Independent work for undergraduates

By special arrangement with faculty only. Only for students presenting strong geography preparation.

+ GES 9500-1 to 4. Independent Study in Geography: Graduate

Independent work for graduate students. By special arrangement with faculty only. Prer., Consent of instructor.

+ GES 9600-1 to 4. Independent Study in Geography: Graduate

Independent work for graduate students. By special arrangement with faculty only. Prer., Consent of instructor.

+ GES 9990-0. Candidate for Degree.

No Description