Undergraduate & Graduate Literature/Rhetoric Courses

ENGL 150-3. Introduction to Literature for Non-Majors.

Fundamental literary analysis of poetry, drama and fiction. This course is a prerequisite to all other literature courses. Approved for LAS Humanities area requirement. GT-AH2. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent, or score of 29+ on English ACT or score of 690+ on English SAT.

ENGL 180-3. Fundamentals of Creative Writing: Multiple Genres.

Students will learn the skills needed to write effective poetry, fictions, and creative nonfiction. They will also analyze written texts, participate in workshops, build vocabulary, and explore the emerging field of creative writing as an academic discipline.

ENGL 190-3. Introduction to Literary Studies (For Majors Only).

Introduction to study of poetry, drama and fiction designed specifically to prepare majors for advanced work in literature. This course is a prerequisite for English majors to every other literature course in the department of English except ENGL 150. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent, or score of 29+ on the English ACT or score of 690+ on English SAT.

 
ENGL 203-3. Introduction to Creative Writing-Poetry.

For the beginning student who wants to write poetry. Workshop approach. Prer. ENGL 131 or consent of the instructor.

ENGL 204-3. Introduction to Creative Nonfiction Prose.

Focusing on writing nonfiction pieces, the course explores this burgeoning genre, represented by literary journalism, essays, memoirs, personal narratives, and confessional writing. Students will write in these formats, and their work will be critiqued in class. Reading includes some of today’s best nonfiction. Prer., ENGL 131 or instructor consent.

ENGL 205-3. Introduction to Creative Writing-Fiction.

Exercises in perception and voice designed to develop students' abilities to write fiction. Workshop approach. Prer. ENGL131 or consent of the instructor.

ENGL 251-3. Survey of British Literature I.

Chronological study of major British writers from the beginnings (Beowulf) through the works of Shakespeare. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 252-3. Survey of British Literature II.

Chronological study of major British writers from the period following the English Renaissance through the eighteenth century, or from John Donne and John Milton to Thomas Gray and Jane Austen. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 253-3. Survey of British Literature III.

Chronological study of major British writers from the Romantic period through the rest of the nineteenth century, or from the Romantics (Blake, Burns, etc.) to Yeats. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 254-3. Survey of British Literature IV.

Chronological survey of major British writers from Joyce to Beckett, or from the start of the twentieth century to the contemporary era. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 260-3. Literature: The Global Perspective I.

Designed to introduce students to literature from the ancient and early modern world; particular attention to emerging notions of Western culture and an indebtedness to exchanges with the East. Approved for LAS Humanities area and Global Awareness requirements. GT-AH2. Prer., ENGL 131 and either ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 261-3. Literature: The Global Perspective II.

Examines modern works with particular attention to literature outside North America and Great Britain and to how a quickly and often violently changing world affects regional cultures. Approved for LAS Humanities area and Global Awareness requirements. GT-AH2. Prer., ENGL 131 and either ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 280-3. Film and Fiction.

This is a course that examines the “transformational” process by which a novel (or short story) is adapted to film. What is gained, lost, altered in that process is then used as a means of coming to understand that novel or short story. Most typically what will not really “transform” itself to film is used as the basis of critical analysis. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 290-3. Topics in Literature.

While the topic varies by semester and instructor, this course will always focus on national diversity and/or global awareness through the study of how literature and socio-political conditions are reciprocally influenced. Approved for LAS Humanities area requirement. Prer., ENGL 131 or validated equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 291-1 to 3. Topics in Literature.

Topics will vary from year to year and may or may not be offered in any given semester. See individual course schedules for Fall or Spring. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 300-3. Literary Criticism in Theory and Practice.  

Introduces students to various critic al methods, which they will apply to novels and works from other literary genres; students will also have opportunities to hear English faculty members engage in critical interchange. Prer., Engl 131 or equivalent and Engl 150 or Engl 190.

ENGL 301-3. Advanced Composition.  

Writing workshop that offers students the opportunity to work on advanced writing projects and enhance their repertoire of rhetorical strategies. Specific writing projects may vary. TEP sections of ENGL 301 also emphasize instructional strategies for managing the writing process in public school settings. Prer., ENGL 131 and ENGL 141 or equivalent.

ENGL 303-3. Intermediate Creative Writing-Poetry.

For the experienced writer of poetry. Workshop approach. Prer., ENGL 203 or consent of instructor.

ENGL 304-3. Intermediate Creative Non-Fiction.

Focusing on personal narrative writing, this course explores the genre of memoir and autobiographical writing. This course is workshop intensive using in-class writing assignments, class critiques, close reading, and discussion of essays. Through memoir, students learn to lift the raw material of life and shape experiences, transform events and deliver wisdom. Prer., ENGL 204 or consent of instructor.

ENGL 305-3. Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction.

Exercises in perception and voice and critical discussion of student work in the forms of fiction. Limited to 21 students. By consent of instructor only. Based upon demonstrated desire and ability to write. Workshop approach. May be taken twice for credit.

ENGL 320-3. Women Writers and Women's Experiences.

Study of some women writers deserving attention because of their artistry and depiction of women’s lives. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Prer., ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with WMST 320.

ENGL 332-3. Born in the USA: Masterpieces of American Literature. 

A study of the works by American masters of fiction, poetry, drama, and prose nonfiction, emphasizing the relationship of the literature to its cultural and historical contexts. Examining works of cultural diversity and giving various perspectives of America, the course includes readings by Native-American, African American, Asian American, and Latino/a writers. Approved for LAS Humanities and Cultural Diversity requirements. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 338-3. Survey of American Literature I. 

Surveys the foundational texts of American Literary history from the literatures of European encounters with New World Amerindians (Columbus, Cabeza de Vaca, Smith), through the American Romantics (Poe, Hawthorne, Melville) with attention to the cultural and social contexts in which these literatures were produced. Includes study of Puritan literary forms (the Jeremiad, the Captivity Narrative, the meta-physical poetry of Bradstreet and/or Taylor) and reflects on how these forms were revised by such authors as Douglass and Whitman in light of antebellum engagements with the problems of race, class, and gender. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 339-3. Survey of American Literature II. 

Surveys the development of American Literary voices from the Civil War era experimentations of Davis, Crane and Dickinson, through development of American Modernism in poetry and prose (Williams, Eliot, Stevens, Anderson, Hemingway, Faulkner, concluding with the Native American Renaissance of the 1960s and 70s. Includes such writers as Twain, James, Wharton and/or Chopin with the attention to race-relations, immigration and the New Woman, as well as surveying the development of the African-American literary tradition through the writings of Washington, DuBois, Toomer, Wright, and/or Hurston. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 346-3. Race, Writing & Difference in the Contemporary American Novel.

A study of major writers and developments in the fast-expanding field of American ethnic minority literature, the course examines a representative group of novelists who write of the African American, Latino/a or Hispanic, Asian American, and Native American experiences. The ethnic minority novel transmits ethnic identity and cultural history and recovers lost histories and suppressed voices. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190 or EST 200. Meets with EST 346.

ENGL 353-3. Literature of the English Renaissance, Excluding Shakespeare.

Explores the cultural currents in the time of Shakespeare through four important literary genres: lyric, drama (non-Shakespearean), epic/romance, and various forms of prose. Prer., ENGL 131 or validated equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190 or EMST 200.

ENGL 355-3. Native American Literature.

Provides students with the necessary cultural and literary background required to understand and appreciate some of the major works of Native American literature. Prer., ENGL 131 or validated equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with EMST 355.

ENGL 360-3. Contemporary African American Literature.

Provides students with the necessary cultural and literary background required to understand and appreciate some of the major works of African American Literature. Prer., ENGL 131 or validated equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190 or EMST 200. Meets with EST 360.

ENGL 381-3: Writing Across the Curriculum: Tutoring Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines.
Course examines the inquiry processes in the Sciences, Social Sciences and Humanities, and how that knowledge is expressed through specific writing styles, forms and conventions. Students will complete a practicum component either in the Writing Center or classroom. Prer., ENGL 131 and ENGL 141.
ENGL 390-3. Topics in Literature.

While the topic varies by semester and instructor, this course will focus on national awareness and/or global awareness through the study of how literature and socio-political conditions are reciprocally influenced. Approved for LAS Humanities area requirement. Prer., ENGL 131 and either ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 391-1 to 3. Topics in Literature.

Topics will vary from semester to semester. Check Fall and Spring schedules. May be taken up to two times for credit with permission of department chair. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 395-3. Chaucer.

Study of major works with emphasis on “Canterbury Tales.” Readings will be in middle English; short introduction to the language will precede study of the poetry. Prer. ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 397-3. Shakespeare I.

Comedies and Histories. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 398-3. Shakespeare II.

Tragedies and Romances. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 420-3. The Eighteenth-Century British Novel: Defoe to Austen.

Traces the emergence of the novel from its subliterary roots in early 18th century to its stunning transformation by early 19th century. Examines historical context, narrative techniques, theory of character, and major themes. Authors include Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, and Austen. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 520. 

ENGL 421-3. The Nineteenth-Century British Novel.

Continuation of 420, but may be taken without previous novel course. Examines major British novels of the 19th century and early 20th century. Authors include the Brontes, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 521. 

ENGL 423-3. Development of the American Novel I.

Study of the American novel from its beginnings, with the work of Charles Brockden Brown, through the 19th century, concluding with the work of Henry James. Will examine both artistic development of American writers and the novels’ functions as vehicles of cultural history. Prer., ENGL 131 or validated equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 523. 

ENGL 424-3. Development of the American Novel II.

Continuation of ENGL 423. Covers development of the “modern” realistic novel, from beginning of the 20th century through 1945, and examines work of Wharton, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Dreiser, Wright and others. Prer., ENGL 131 or validated equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 524. 

ENGL 425-3. Contemporary Novel.

Study of major novelists and developments in the genre, with emphasis on British and American novels written since 1965. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 525. 

ENGL 430-3. Studies in American Literature and Culture.

Advanced study of such topics as early American and modern American poetry and literature of the American frontier. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 530. 

ENGL 440-3. Genre Studies.

Topics may include medieval epic and romance, lyric poetry, dramatic comedy, medieval comedy, satire. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 540. 

ENGL 450-3. Studies in Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Literature.

Study of major works in prose, poetry, and drama of medieval Europe. May be repeated for credit with permission of the department chair. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 550. 

ENGL 480-3. Peer Tutoring: Writing Across the Curriculum.

Study of writing center theory and practice in the tutoring of writing. Students will participate in two hours of supervised tutoring in the Excel Writing Center, weekly. Required for employment as writing center tutors. All majors and master’s candidates encouraged to enroll. Prer., ENGL 131 and ENGL 141. Meets with ENGL 580.

ENGL 483-3. Rhetoric and Writing: Survey in Contemporary Approaches to Teaching Writing.

Theoretical and practical study of writing processes across diverse contexts. Explores the rhetorical nature of writing, and applies rhetorical theory and research to the teaching and practice of writing. See the Schedule of Courses for the topic in any given semester. Prer., Upper-division standing or permission of instructor, and ENGL 131 and ENGL 141 or course equivalents. Meets with ENGL 583. 

ENGL 484-3. Practicum for Writing Instructors.

Training practicum for writing instructors at the college level. Theoretical inquiry and practical development of syllabi, course plans, and instructional materials. May be taken for a grade or Pass/Fail. Meets with ENGL 584. 

ENGL 485-3. History of the English Language.

Outline of the history of the English language including a brief survey of sound changes, of grammatical forms and of the vocabulary. Meets with ENGL 585. 

ENGL 486-3. Special Topics in Rhetoric and Writing.

Advanced, in-depth study of the theoretical and practical accomplishments of writers and rhetors across diverse historical contexts. Rhetors, theorists, and historical contexts shift with topics. Prer., ENGL 131 and ENGL 141 or equivalent courses. Meets with ENGL 586. 

ENGL 495-3. Seminar in Literary Topics.

Course topic will vary by semester. Check Schedule off Courses each term for specific course content. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 595. 

ENGL 498-3. Seminar in Major Author.

Author varies from semester to semester and may not be offered in any given year. Check schedule of courses for specific information. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 598 and WMST 498, if appropriate. 


Graduate Courses
ENGL 520-3. The Eighteenth-Century British Novel: Defoe to Austen

Traces the emergence of the novel from its subliterary roots in early 18th century to its stunning transformation by the early 19th century. Examines historical context, narrative techniques, theory of character, and major themes. Authors include Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, and Austen. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 420.

ENGL 521-3. The Nineteenth-Century British Novel.

Continuation of 520, but may be taken without previous novel course. Examines major British novels of the 19th century and early 20th century. Authors include Bronte, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. Prer., ENGL 131 or validated equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 421. 

ENGL 523-3. Development of the American Novel I.

Study of the American novel from its beginnings with the work of Charles Brockden Brown, through the 19th century, concluding with the work of Henry James. Will examine both artistic development of American writers and the novel’s functions as vehicles of cultural history. Prer., ENGL 131 or validated equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 423. 

ENGL 524-3. Development of the American Novel II.

Continuation of ENGL 523. Covers development of the “modern” realistic novel from beginning of the 20th century through 1945 and examines work of Wharton, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Dreiser, Wright and others. Prer., ENGL 131 or validated equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 424. 

ENGL 525-3. Contemporary Novel.

Study of major novelists and developments in the genre, with emphasis on British and American novels written since 1965. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 425. 

ENGL 530-3. Studies in American Literature and Culture.

Advanced study of such topics as early American and modern American poetry and literature of the early American frontier. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 430. 

ENGL 540-3. Genre Studies. 

Topics may include medieval epic and romance, dramatic comedy, medieval comedy, satire. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 440. 

ENGL 550-3. Studies in Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Literature. 

Study of major works in prose, poetry, and drama of medieval Europe. May be repeated for credit with the permission of the department chair. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 450.

ENGL 580-3. Peer Tutoring: Writing Across the Curriculum.

Study of writing center theory and practice in the tutoring of writing. Students will participate in two hours of supervised tutoring in the Excel Writing Center, weekly. Required for employment as writing center tutors. All majors and master’s candidates encouraged to enroll. Prer., ENGL 131, ENGL 141. Meets with ENGL 480.

ENGL 583-3. Rhetoric and Writing: Survey in Contemporary Approaches to Teaching Writing. 

Theoretical and practical study of writing processes across diverse contexts. Explores the rhetorical nature of writing and applies rhetorical theory and research to the teaching and practice of writing. Recommended for students and professionals interested in teaching writing in the public schools or at the college level, also intended for students interested in pursuing graduate studies in Rhetoric and Composition. Designed as a graduate seminar. Meets with ENGL 483. 

ENGL 584-3.  Graduate Practicum for Writing Instructors.

Graduate training practicum for writing instructors at the college level. Theoretical inquiry and practical development of syllabi, course plans, and instructional materials. May be taken for a grade or Pass/Fail. Meets with ENGL 484.

ENGL 585-3. History of the English Language. 

Outline of the history of the English language including a brief survey of sound changes, of grammatical forms and of the vocabulary. Meets with ENGL 485.

ENGL 586-3. Special Topics in Rhetoric and Writing.

Advanced, in-depth study of the theoretical and practical accomplishments of writers and rhetors across diverse historical contexts. Rhetors, theorists and historical contexts shift with topics. Prer., ENGL 131 and ENGL 141 or equivalent courses. Meets with ENGL 486.

ENGL 595-3. Seminar in Literary Topics. 

Course topic will vary by semester. Check the Schedule of Courses each term for specific course content. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chair. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 495. 

ENGL 598-3. Seminar in Major Author. 

Authors to vary from semester to semester and may not be offered in any given year. Check Schedule of Courses for specific information. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chairperson. Prer., ENGL 131 or equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190. Meets with ENGL 498 and WMST 498, if appropriate. 

ENGL 696-3. Renaissance Drama Exclusive of Shakespeare.

Graduate study in the major plays of Elizabethan and Stuart drama from the 1580s to the closing of the theaters in 1642. Consideration of representative sub-genres of comedy, history, tragedy, and romance in the context of their culture. Prer., ENGL 131 or validated equivalent and ENGL 150 or ENGL 190.

ENGL 940-1 to 3. Independent Study. 

Students may not enroll for independent study in this course without prior consent of the English faculty. A student desiring independent study credit must present to the faculty, in writing, a well-defined topic for research which is not included in the regular English course offerings. Approval for such study must be secured from the department chair before registration. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chairperson.

ENGL 950-1 to 3. Independent Study in English.