Bret Windom

Dr. Bret Windom

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

Assistant Professor

College of Engineering & Applied Science

University of Colorado Colorado Springs


Biography

Dr. Bret Windom is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. He obtained B.S, M.S and Ph.D degrees in Mechnical Engineering from University of Florida in 2004, 2006 and 2009, respectively.

Research Statement

Engines operate at high pressures to maximize efficiencies and benefit from turbulence by improving reactant mixing and increased flame propagation. Unfortunately, these conditions, which dominate real-life applications, present the greatest challenges and difficulty to fundamentally characterize. To develop high fidelity models capable of simulating complex engine behavior, experimental data and validation targets at these extreme conditions (i.e. high pressures and high Reynolds numbers) must be measured. In addition, further complication is introduced by attempting to simulate complex fuels, which can contain thousands of components, in an already difficult to describe environment.

My most recent post-doctoral research as part of the Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center (CEFRC) has provided me with specific research projects aimed at advancing high pressure flame propagation measurements and turbulent flame diagnostics. My prior postdoctoral position at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) enabled me to explore the thermo-physical properties of new bio-derived and traditional petroleum based fuels. These two experiences, coupled with the diagnostics knowledge and experiences gained during my graduate research, will allow me to develop a state of the art research facility to study fundamental combustion at conditions relevant to engines (i.e. high pressures and high Reynolds numbers) and explore the physical and chemical properties of newly developed fuels aiding in their design and surrogate formulation. The research proposed herein is expected to impact the development of complex engine simulations and the subsequent design of new generation high efficiency and low emission engines.

Current and Previous Research

Currently, my post doctoral research as part of the CEFRC is focused on flame characterization using advanced diagnostics. This position has allowed me to work under the supervision of two distinguished professors at high level research universities; Professor Fokion Egolfopoulos at the University of Southern California (USC) and Professor Yiguang Ju at Princeton University.

At present I am heavily involved in two projects at Princeton University. The first uses fast scan laser absorption spectroscopy (mid-IR, 1300–1400 cm-1) to quantitatively measure products and intermediate combustion species following nano-second discharge events (i.e. transient plasma). Alternative ignition (or radical generation) sources such as plasma have shown to promote combustion efficiency and/or reduce unwanted emissions and are thus of great interest to the Air Force and many aerospace, shipping, and ground transportation industries [1]. The second project is aimed at understanding the coupling of combustion and complex fluid dynamics that occur in turbulent flames. By using simultaneous particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) we expect to uncover unknowns associated with turbulent combustion which will be highly applicable to high speed propulsion systems, as well as, power generating turbine driven combustors.

While working at USC my research focused on characterizing spherically expanding flames (SEF) to improve flame speed measurements at high pressures. This is an important task as flame propagation speeds are one of the only metrics measurable/capable at high pressures to successfully validate kinetic models. At USC I implemented a new technique which uses PIV to investigate the propagation of SEFs. This technique provides a direct measurement of the flame speed by simultaneously measuring the flame displacement and the unburned gas velocity (as depicted in figure below) and thus avoids the use of certain assumptions that are applied to traditional techniques. This new approach also has the ability to  investigate in detail the flow field of the unburned and burned gas revealing insight regarding the coupling between the flame propagation and the gas dynamics, which can aid in a better understanding of thermo-diffusive instabilities and how a flame transitions into turbulence/unsteadiness.

As a post doctoral researcher at NIST in Boulder, CO, I focused on the characterization of complex fuels to promote equation of state development and new surrogate formulations. Due to the complex compositions of most fuels, high level characterization and property measurements of these fluids are extremely difficult. One of the most comprehensive ways to physically characterize a fluid of this sort is through its vapor liquid equilibrium (VLE) or the distillation curve. Utilizing the advanced distillation curve (ADC) measurement technique and apparatus, I characterized the VLE of many different fuels, including novel biodiesels, oxygenated diesels, liquid rocket propellants, jet fuels, unleaded and leaded aviation fuels, diesel fuels, and gasolines. In many of the studies, the data was directly used to develop surrogate formulations optimized to fit thermo-physical properties held by the parent fuel (e.g. [2]). As an extension of this work, I developed a reduced pressure advanced distillation apparatus that enabled distillation curve measurements at pressures as low as 0.1 kPa, which has led to volatility measurements and thermal degradation studies of waste oils, biodiesels, and crude oils [3].

Research Plan

High Pressure Flame Transition Study

Using my research from USC and Princeton as a foundation, I plan to explore flame transition from the laminar propagation regime into unsteadiness. This transition, especially at high pressures, is of great importance as this constantly occurs in propagating flames within internal combustion engines (ICE). Without an accurate description of a flames transition from steady to unsteady propagation, successful prediction of the combustion process within practical engines will be impossible. Using SEFs, which represent conditions experienced in ICEs (i.e. constant volume freely propagating flame), the effect of both thermo-diffusive and hydrodynamic instabilities will be examined. Thermo-diffusive instabilities, or the so called Lewis number effect, occur as a result of an imbalance of energy as a result of unmatched thermal and molecular diffusion of the reacting mixture. This type of instability is highly applicable to lean hydrogen combustion, which is and will be extremely important in power generation systems. Hydrodynamic instabilities occur as a result of the fluid dynamics of the reacting flow (e.g. turbulent combustion) either induced externally or as a result of the combustion process.

Following localized perturbations of the SEF (e.g. by an obstacle, jet flow, or acoustic source), PIV of the unburned and burned gas will be performed to measure localized flame propagation rates. Simultaneous planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) of radical species and/or high speed Schlieren imaging will provide additional insight about the flame structure and shed more light on the so called flame “memory” effects, which describe how perturbations upstream can propagate and lead to increased unsteadiness in the flame further downstream [4]. Varying diluents and fuel compositions will provide information regarding the thermo-diffusive instabilities.

The core of this work will revolve around a high pressure chamber capable of safely reaching pressures experienced in engines (i.e. up to 30 atm pre-combustion pressure and 90 atm post combustion pressure). To enable optical access (i.e. the installation of quartz windows) necessary for the appropriate diagnostics, a sophisticated pressure relief system design will be implemented. A particle seeding system will be installed to introduce either oil particles which will burn and provide a measure of the flame location, or with solid particles which will penetrate the flame providing additional information regarding the flow characteristics of the burned gas and its role on flame unsteadiness. Following the acquisition of the raw experimental data, sensitive image processing and PIV algorithms will be used to quantify local flame speeds, as well as, the production and propagation of flame surface instabilities. This work could lead to collaborative research with other Mechanical Engineering faculty, especially those focusing on computational fluid dynamics and reacting flows. 

Fuel Surrogate Research

The simplification of the complex fuel into a surrogate allows for the chemical modeling of a complex fuel in complex engine simulations. Without simplifying the fuel and thus the number of elementary reactions needed to model the oxidation, the computational cost of these complex simulations would be too high. At NIST I had the opportunity to participate in studies aimed at developing surrogate models to simulate the thermo-physical properties (e.g. volatility, density, heats of combustion) of complex fuels [2]. At Princeton, I have worked alongside efforts aimed to develop jet fuel surrogates by using combustion criterion, such as flame speeds to address fuel reactivity, intermediate oxidation species profiles to estimate combustion pathways, auto-ignition behavior, and sooting indices [5]. As an additional research plan, I propose to develop and use a surrogate development strategy which incorporates important thermo-physical property measurements along with relevant oxidation/pyrolysis metrics to model new generation fuels. This is important as it will provide an all inclusive design (i.e. thermo-physical and chemical properties) that will replicate the important features that often other surrogate formulation methods neglect.

Specifically, property characterization of the parent fuel will be focused around measurements made using the ADC approach as detailed in my previous research. This will provide valuable information regarding the thermo-physical behavior of the fuel and supply a strict constraint from which to optimize the surrogate formulation. Incorporating gas chromatography methods in concert with the ADC will enable a detailed examination of the fuel composition. Upon knowing the composition, other important fluid properties can be determined with the assistance of NIST property databases, including the composite molecular weight, energy density, molecular classification, and cetane number which are all important fuel characteristics needed to derive a capable fuel surrogate. Combustion related experiments will be performed on the surrogate and original fuel to compare reactivity. Flame speeds (which can be measured in the high pressure combustion chamber previously discussed) provide a description of fuels high temperature reactivity while a low temperature chemical reactor coupled with gas chromatography and/or laser absorption diagnostics will supply information regarding the low temperature chemistry of the fuel. I would expect this work to provide external collaborations with both members at NIST and Princeton University, as well as, members of the UCSB Chemical Engineering Department. Using my experiences at NIST along with my experience in characterizing reacting flow with in situ laser diagnostics, I feel that I am suited to make an impact in this research field.

Long-term Research

As a long term research plan, I would like to extend on my Ph.D dissertation and conduct research focused on applying in situ optical diagnostics to study tribology. Specifically, I plan to explore phenomena responsible for the onset of wear as this topic presents a large challenge in efficiently converting the thermal energy (i.e. from combustion) into work.  As a graduate student I developed an in situ micro-Raman scattering system which was used to detect micron thick polymer wear films initiated on a rotating disk tribometer and to explain surface chemical transformations which lead to wear. I found this topic fascinating and would like to apply Raman spectroscopy and more sensitive detection techniques to explore the phenomenon responsible for the onset of material wear. In addition, my experience with surface characterization combined with reacting flows leaves me well suited to study surface reactions regarding clean/efficient oxidation and fuel generation (e.g. H2 production via water gas shift reaction). These research topics would provide additional opportunities for collaborative research within the College of Engineering especially with those in the Material Science and Chemical Engineering Departments.

Sources of Funding

Potential sources of funding include the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), specifically the Energy Conversion and Combustion Sciences program directed by Dr. Chiping Li. They offer a Young Investigators Research Program that I would plan to seek funding from. The Department of Energy (DOE) is another possible source of funding, specifically through the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D program directed by Gurprett Singh and the Fuel Technologies program directed by Kevin Stork. I will also seek grants offered by National Science Foundation (NSF) particularly suited to The Combustion, Fire, and Plasma Systems program. Both the DOE and the NSF offer programs especially tailored to young faculty from which I will apply for, namely the DOE’s Office of Science Early Career Research and the NSF’s Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) program. Additional funds would be sought from industrial sources interested in combustion/fuel characterization such as Caterpillar Inc., Solar Turbines Inc., Cummins Inc., John Deere, and Siemens to name a few. Also, I expect my experience in complex fluid characterization to lead to funding opportunities from the many petroleum and natural gas industries in the region. Finally, there is the potential for collaboration with members of government facilities including, NIST-Boulder, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sandia National Labs which could lead to summer research opportunities.

In summary, I hope to advance combustion related energy conversion by designing experiments that can help to fundamentally explain combustion phenomena at conditions relevant to engine operation. Improving our understanding of the combustion process while simplifying the complexity of practical fuels by designing highly representative surrogates will lead faster more accurate engine simulations which will have an enormous impact on the development of high efficiency low emitting combustion devices.

References

  1. Starikovskaia, S.M., Plasma assisted ignition and combustion, Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, 2006, 39(16), R265.
  2. Windom, B.C., Huber, M.L., Bruno, T.J., Lown, A.L., Lira, C.T., “Measurements and Modeling Study on a High-Aromatic Diesel Fuel” Energy & Fuels, 2012, 26(3), 1787-1797.
  3. Windom, B.C., Bruno, T.J. “Pressure-Controlled Advanced Distillation Curve Analysis of Biodiesel Fuels: Assessment of Thermal Decomposition” Energy & Fuels, 2012, 26(4), 2407-2415.
  4. Driscoll, J., Turbulent premixed combustion: flamelet structure and its effect on turbulent burning velocities, Progress in Energy and Combustion Science, 2008, 34(1), 91-134.
  5. Dooley, S., Won, S.H., Chaos, M., Heyne, J., Ju, Y., Dryer, F.L., Kumar, K., Sung, C-J., Wang, H., Oehlschlaeger, M.A., Santoro, R.J., Litzinger, T.A., A Jet Fuel Surrogate Formulated by Real Fuel Properties, Combustion and  Flame2010, 157(12), 2333–2339.

Research Summary

Engines operate at high pressures to maximize efficiencies and benefit from turbulence by improving reactant mixing and increased flame propagation. Unfortunately, these conditions, which dominate real-life applications, present the greatest challenges and difficulty to fundamentally characterize. To further complicate this process, commonly used fuels contain thousands of components and thus require the accurate knowledge of tens of thousands of individual reactions to describe the combustion chemistry. The advent of new more efficient, fuel flexible, and less polluting advanced engines will stem from the ability to accurately predict/simulate the complex behavior inside the combustor. To develop high fidelity models capable of simulating complex engine behavior, experimental data and validation targets at these extreme conditions (i.e. high pressures, temperature, Reynolds numbers for complex fuels) must be measured. The necessary fundamental understanding must be gained so that appropriate simplifications can be implemented to operate these numerical simulations in a realistic/cost effective manner. Stemming from this, one particular research interest of mine is focused on gaining a basic understanding regarding the role of physical and chemical properties of traditional and new bio-derived fuels on the energy conversion process realized in actual engine operation.
Due to the complex and varying composition of most fuels, high level characterization and property measurements of these fluids are extremely difficult. One of the most comprehensive ways to physically characterize a fluid of this sort is through its vapor liquid equilibrium (VLE) or the distillation curve. Utilizing the advanced distillation curve (ADC) measurement technique and apparatus, we are characterizing the VLE of many different fuels, including novel biodiesels, oxygenated diesels, liquid rocket propellants, jet fuels, unleaded and leaded aviation fuels, diesel fuels, and gasolines. In many of the studies, the data is directly used to develop surrogate formulations optimized to fit thermo-physical properties held by the parent fuel. This provides a means to simplify the fuel from 1000’s of compounds to just a few, which can greatly simplify the number of reactions required to describe the chemical kinetics and drastically reduce comprehensive CFD simulation computing times.  Furthermore, the volatility of fuels is a required input to describe the spray dynamics and droplet combustion phenomenon experienced in engines.
To gain an understanding of the combustion process at conditions relevant to engine operation, experiments are being designed and carried out to measure fundamental flame properties and chemical species at high pressures, high temperatures, and highly turbulent flow conditions. One of the only metrics measurable and capable at high pressures to successfully validate combustion kinetic models is the flame propagation speed. Using novel laser based techniques we are more precisely measuring the propagation of spherically expanding flames at elevated pressures. We are investigating the complex chemistry turbulence interactions by evaluating the role of low temperature chemistry (i.e. reactions which occur for specific fuel molecules at temperature much lower than the adiabatic flame temperature) on turbulent flame propagation and flame structures. Using optical based diagnostics (fluorescence imaging, PIV, and flame chemiluminescence) we are monitoring the change of the reactants during the low temperature reactions and evaluating the effect of this change on the high temperature flame properties. In turbine engines, fuels are often injected into an oxidizer stream which is at elevated temperatures. Depending on the conditions and the time scales associated with the process, this presents an opportunity for low temperature reactions to occur prior to the reactants entering the high temperature flame. This work has potential impact on high speed turbine engine applications and the modeling of the combustion therein.


Additional Interests:

Novel Combustion Strategies
Plasma assisted combustion has been shown to promote chemical kinetic pathways resulting in more complete combustion and reduced unburned hydrocarbons and NOx emissions while promoting  flame propagation which is important in high speed operation (i.e hypersonic flight). With the addition of plasma and plasma chemistry there is added complexity to the combustion process. The added chemistry of ions, excited species, and new radical species has a significant influence on the combustion and must be considered.  Using laser based diagnostics I am interested in probing the plasma assisted kinetics to gain a better understanding regarding the effect of these new species on the energy conversion process.

Fuel Reformation
With the evolving variability in petroleum sources along with introduction of new bio derived source streams. There is a need to develop refining strategies that are flexible enough to apply to a wide range of sources and have the controllability to produce a tightly specified refined product required by advanced engines. As an extension of the fuel characterization work previously discussed, we have developed a reduced pressure advanced distillation apparatus that enables volatility measurements and complex fluid separations at pressures as low as 0.1 kPa, which has led to volatility measurements and thermal degradation studies of waste oils, biodiesels, and crude oils. I am interested in using this technology in concert with the knowledge gained regarding chemical kinetics during my previous post-docs towards projects involved with fuel reforming.

Tribology and Process Monitoring
Stemming from my graduate research I am interested in applying laser based diagnostics to fundamental aspects of tribology (the study of friction and wear) and toward real-time process/environmental monitoring. Using surface characterization techniques (Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, interferometry, etc.) I hope to probe physical and chemical surface phenomena which are responsible for friction and the onset of wear. Finally, using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and other laser based diagnostics, I am interested in designing systems used for environmental and process monitoring, with possible applications related to mining, emissions monitoring, or process systems.

EDUCATION

University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611
Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, August 8, 2009
Dissertation title: Optical diagnostic techniques in tribological analysis: applications to wear film characterization, solid lubricant chemical transition, and electrical sliding contacts.

University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611
M.S., Mechanical Engineering, August 2006
Thesis title: Implementation of aerodynamic focusing and a dual-pulse configuration to improve laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy aerosol particle sampling rates and analyte response.

University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611
B.S., Mechanical Engineering, December 2004
Cum Laude

WORK EXPERIENCE

Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center Postdoctoral Fellowship          (May 2011 - Current)
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
Supervisor: Prof. Fokion Egolfopoulos, 213.740.0480
Princeton University, Princeton, NJ
Supervisor: Prof. Yiguang Ju, 609.258.5644

Working on multiple research projects investigating and advancing the characterization of flames and reacting flows under conditions relevant to real world applications

  • Assisted in the completion of a spherically expanding flame combustion system (USC)
  • Experimentally measured flame propagation of syngas fuels at elevated pressures (USC)
  • Designed and implemented new PIV diagnostic technique to further investigate flame propagation of spherically expanding flames (USC)
  • Used combustion simulations and reaction modeling  to aid in the design of experiments
  • Investigating turbulent flames to understand the coupling between complex fluid dynamics and low temperature combustion regimes (Princeton)
  • Implementing laser absorption diagnostics for in situ characterization of plasma assisted combustion (Princeton)

National Academy of Sciences Postdoctoral Associate            (July 2009 - May 2011)
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO
Supervisor: Dr. Thomas J. Bruno, 303.497.5158

Worked on multiple research projects investigating and advancing volatility measurements of renewable and petroleum based hydrocarbon fuels

  • Designed a new apparatus and method to precisely measure fluid volatilities at reduced pressure
  • Analyzed temperature degradation effects of crude oils and biodiesel fuels with new reduced pressure advanced distillation apparatus coupled with GC-MS.
  • Analyzed the vapor liquid equilibrium variability of rocket propellants.
  • Applied the Advanced Distillation Curve method to analyze the volatility and composition of various hydrocarbon fuels to aid equation of state modeling and surrogate formulations.
  • Performed quantitative chromatographic analysis on hydrocarbon mixtures to track the changing energy content of mixture during a distillation.

Graduate Student Research                                                      (January 2005 – July 2009)
Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Supervisor: Prof. David W. Hahn, 352.392.0807

Worked on multiple research projects in which optical techniques were implemented to study fundamental problems ranging from plasma-particle interactions to micro-scale wear and tribological phenomena

  • Studied the effect of a dual laser pulse configuration on the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopic analysis of gaseous and aerosol analyte systems.
  • Designed and constructed a micro-Raman/tribometer system for the in situ characterization of initial wear films.
  • Used Raman spectroscopy to investigate plasticization of polymers during tribological tests.
  • Worked together with tribologists on a multi-disciplinary project to understand wear phenomena of sliding electrical contacts by use of atomic emission spectroscopy techniques.
  • Applied Raman spectroscopy toward understanding the chemical transformation/oxidation of molybdenum disulfide as it applies to solid film lubrication.
  • Investigated matrix related error and plasma-analyte interactions in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of metals in solid and aerosol forms.

TEACHING EXPERIENCE

  • Teaching assistant for undergraduate Heat and Mass Transfer Class. Duties included office hours leading to one on one discussions and occasional large group instruction.
  • Supervised undergraduate students research as part of the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) program offered by NIST
  • Mentored graduate students in the lab at Princeton University and the University of Southern California

PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL ARTICLES

Won, S.H., Windom, B.C., Jiang, B., Ju, Y., The role of low temperature fuel chemistry on turbulent flame propagation” Combustion and Flame, 2013, Accepted.

Shukla, B., Gururajan, V., Eisazadeh-Far, K., Windom, B.C., Egolfopoulos, F.N., “Effects of electrode geometry on transient plasma induced ignition” Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, 2013,4, 205201.

Windom, B.C. and Bruno, T.J., “Application of pressure-controlled advanced distillation curve analysis:  Virgin and Waste Oils” Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 2013, 52(1), 327-337.

Windom, B.C., Bruno, T.J. “Pressure-Controlled Advanced Distillation Curve Analysis of Biodiesel Fuels: Assessment of Thermal Decomposition” Energy & Fuels, 2012, 26(4), 2407-2415.

Windom, B.C., Huber, M.L., Bruno, T.J., Lown, A.L., Lira, C.T., “Measurements and Modeling Study on a High-Aromatic Diesel Fuel” Energy & Fuels, 2012, 26(3), 1787-1797.

Windom, B.C., Bruno, T.J., “Assessment of the Composition and Distillation Properties of Thermally Stressed RP-1 and RP-2: Application to Fuel Regenerative Cooling” Energy & Fuels, 2011, 25(11), 5200-5214.

Bruno, T.J., Windom, B.C., “Method and Apparatus for the Thermal Stress of Complex Fluids: Application to Fuels” Energy & Fuels, 2011, 25(6), 2625-2632.

Bruno, T.J., Windom, B.C., “Chromatographic sample collection from two-phase flows” Journal of Chromatography A, 2011, 1218(48), 8594-8599.

Windom, B.C., Sawyer, W.G., and Hahn, D.W., “A Raman spectroscopic study of MoS2 and MoO3: applications to tribological systems” Tribology Letters, 2011, 42(3), 301-310.

Windom, B.C., Lovestead, T.M., Mascal, M., Nitkin, E.B., and Bruno, T.J., “Advanced distillation curve analysis on ethyl levulinate as a diesel fuel oxygenate and a hybrid biodiesel fuel” Energy & Fuels, 2011, 25(4), 1878-1890.

Lovestead, T.M., Windom, B.C., Riggs, J.R., Nickell, C., and Bruno, T.J., “Assessment of the Compositional Variability of RP-1 and RP-2 with the Advanced Distillation Curve Approach” Energy & Fuels, 2010, 24(10), 5611-5623.

Windom, B.C. and Bruno, T.J., “Novel reduced pressure-balance syringe for chromatographic analysis” Journal of Chromatography A, 2010, 1217(47), 7434-7439.

Windom, B.C. and Bruno, T.J., “Improvements in the measurement of distillation curves. 5. reduced pressure composition-explicit approach” Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 2011, 50(2), 1115-1126.

Lovestead, T.M., Windom, B.C. and Bruno, T.J., “Application of the Advanced Distillation Curve Method to the Development of Cuphea-Derived Biodiesel Fuel,” Energy and Fuels, 2010, 24(6), 3665–3675.

Windom, B.C., Lovestead, T.M. and Bruno, T.J., “Application of the Advanced Distillation Curve Method to the Development of Unleaded Aviation Gasoline,” Energy and Fuels, 2010, 24(5), 3275–3284.

Windom, B.C., Hahn, D.W. “Laser ablation-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LA-LIBS): A means for overcoming matrix effects leading to improved analyte response” Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectroscopy, 2009, 24(12), 1665-1675.

Windom, B.C., Diwakar, P.K., and Hahn D.W. “Dual-pulse LIBS for analysis of gaseous and aerosol systems: plasma-analyte interactions” Spectrochimica Acta Part B, 2006, 61, 788-796.

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

Windom, B.C., Won, S.H., Jiang, B., Ju, Y., “Studies of Turbulent Flame Propagation and Chemistry Interaction at Elevated Temperatures and High Reynolds Numbers”, 8th U.S. National Combustion Meeting, Park City, UT, May 19-22, 2013.

Windom, B.C., Won, S.H., Wada, T., Jiang, B., Ju, Y., “Study of Turbulent Flame Propagation and Surface Characteristics at Large Reynolds Numbers”, 51st AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Grapevine, TX, January 7-10, 2013.

Uddi, M., Leftkovitz, J., Windom, B.C., Ju, Y., “Species Measurements of Ethylene Oxidation in a Nanosecond-Pulsed Plasma Discharge Using QCL Absorption Spectroscopy Near 7.6μm”, 51st AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Grapevine, TX, January 7-10, 2013.

Windom, B.C., Xiouris, C., Fincham, A.M., Egolfopoulos, F.N., “A Study of Spherically Expanding Flames Using Particle Image Velocimetry” 2012 Spring Technical Meeting of the Western States Sections of the Combustion Institute, Arizona State University, AZ, March 19-20, 2012.

Eisazadeh-Far, K., Windom, B.C., Jayachandran, J., Fincham, A.M., Egolfopoulos, F.N., “An Experimental Study of Spherically Expanding Flames and the Determination of Laminar Flame Speeds” 2011 Fall Technical Meeting of the Western States Sections of the Combustion Institute, University of California at Riverside, CA, October 16-18, 2011

Windom, B.C., Lovestead, T.M. and Bruno, T.J., “Assessment of the Compositional Variability of RP-1 and RP-2 with the Advanced Distillation Curve Approach” Proceedings of the 57th JANNAF Propulsion Meeting, Colorado Springs, CO, US, May 3-7, 2010.

ADDITIONAL PUBLICATIONS AND ARTICLES IN PREPARATION

Uddi, M., Leftkowitz, J., Windom, B.C., Ju, Y., “Multipass in-situ Mid-Infrared absorption measurements using miniature multipass Herriott cell” Submitted, 2013.

Windom, B.C. and Hahn, D.W., “Raman Spectroscopy”. In Wang, Q. and Chung, Y.W. (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Tribology, Springer, 2013.

Windom, B.C. and Bruno, T.J., “Reduced pressure advanced distillation curve analysis of crude oil” In Preparation, 2013.

Bruno, T.J., Fortin, T.J., Windom, B.C., Widegren, J.A., “Thermophysical properties of thermally stressed RP-1 and RP-2 for application to fuel regenerative cooling: a comprehensive report” Submitted to NIST Journal of Research, 2012.

PRESENTATIONS (* indicates presenting author)

Windom, B.C.*, Won, S.H., Jiang, B., Ju, Y., “Studies of Turbulent Flame Propagation and Chemistry Interaction at Elevated Temperatures and High Reynolds Numbers”, 8th U.S. National Combustion Meeting, Park City, UT, May 19-22, 2013.

Windom, B.C.*, Won, S.H., Wada, T., Jiang, B., Ju, Y., “Study of Turbulent Flame Propagation and Surface Characteristics at Large Reynolds Numbers”, 51st AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Grapevine, TX, January 7-10, 2013.

Uddi, M., Leftkovitz, J., Windom, B.C., Ju, Y.*, “Species Measurements of Ethylene Oxidation in a Nanosecond-Pulsed Plasma Discharge Using QCL Absorption Spectroscopy Near 7.6μm”, 51st AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Grapevine, TX, January 7-10, 2013.

Lovestead, T. *, Windom, B.C., Riggs, J., Nickell, C., Bruno, T.J. “Assessment of the Compositional Variability of RP-1 and RP-2 with the Advanced Distillation Curve Approach” 18th Symposium on Thermophysical Properties, Boulder, CO, June 24-29, 2012.

Lovestead, T. *, Windom, B.C., Mascal, M., Nitkin, E., Bruno, T.J., “Advanced distillation curve analysis on ethyl levulinate as a diesel fuel oxygenate and a hybrid biodiesel fuel” 18th Symposium on Thermophysical Properties, Boulder, CO, June 24-29, 2012.

Windom, B.C., Xiouris, C. *, Fincham, A.M., Egolfopoulos, F.N., “A Study of Spherically Expanding Flames Using Particle Image Velocimetry” 2012 Spring Technical Meeting of the Western States Sections of the Combustion Institute, Arizona State University, AZ, March 19-20, 2012.

Eisazadeh-Far, K., Windom, B.C., Jayachandran, J. *, Fincham, A.M., Egolfopoulos, F.N., “An Experimental Study of Spherically Expanding Flames and the Determination of Laminar Flame Speeds” 2011 Fall Technical Meeting of the Western States Sections of the Combustion Institute, University of California at Riverside, CA, October 16-18, 2011.

Burger, J. *, Lovestead, T., Windom, B.C., Bruno, T.J., “Characterization of renewable fuels and additives with the advanced distillation curve method” 242nd ACS National Meeting, Denver, CO, August 28-September 1, 2011.

Bruno, T.J. *, Lovestead, T., Windom, B.C., “Analysis of complex fluids with the advanced distillation curve method” 242nd ACS National Meeting, Denver, CO, August 28-September 1, 2011.

Windom, B.C.*, Lovestead, T.M., Bruno, T.J.: “Pressure controlled advanced distillation curve analysis of biodiesel fuels” The 241 ACS Meeting, Anaheim, CA, March 30, 2011.

Windom, B.C.* and Bruno, T. J., “Advanced Distillation Curve Method: Reduced Pressure Volatility Measurements” Boulder Laboratories Poster Session, NIST, Boulder, Colorado, June 2010.

Bruno, T.J. *, Windom, B.C., and Lovestead, T.M.: “Assessment of the Compositional Variability of RP-1 and RP-2 with the Advanced Distillation Curve Approach” Proceedings of the 57th JANNAF Propulsion Meeting, Colorado Springs, CO, US, May 3-7, 2010.

Windom, B.C.*, “Research at the University of Florida: Laser-Based Diagnostics Laboratory” Thermophysical Properties Division Seminar, NIST, Boulder, Colorado, November 2009.

Hahn, D.W. *, Diwakar, P.K., Windom, B.C., Jackson, P.B., Asgill, M. and Dalyander, P. “LIBS: Role in Solving the Plasma-Analyte Interaction Puzzle” FACSS2009, Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies Annual Conference, Louisville, KY, October 2009.

Windom, B.C.* and Hahn, D.W. “Laser ablation-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LA-LIBS): A means for overcoming matrix effects leading to improved analyte response” NASLIBS2009, North American Symposium on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, New Orleans, LA, July 2009.

Hahn, D.W. *, Diwakar, P.K., Windom, B.C., Jackson, P.B., Asgill, M. and Dalyander, P. “Plasma-analyte Interactions for LIBS-based Analysis: Plasma-Particle Considerations” NASLIBS2009, North American Symposium on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, New Orleans, LA, July 2009.

Windom, B.C.* and Hahn, D.W. “Dual-Pulse LIBS for Analysis of Gaseous and Aerosol Systems: Plasma-Analyte Interactions” LIBS2006, International Conference on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, Montreal, Canada, September 2006.

AWARDS

  • First Prize in Artistic Merit at the U.S. National Combustion Meeting art competition
  • National Academy of Science/National Research Council postdoctoral associateship program 2009-2011
  • Elsevier Science prize for the poster presentation at 2006 LIBS conference, Montreal, Canada, Sept 2006

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

  • Member of Pi Tau Sigma engineering honor society
  • Member of The Combustion Institute
  • Member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers
  • Member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • Co-chairman of CEFRC junior research associates