Compass Curriculum

Core Writing Courses

ENGL 1310 is the first core writing course across the university. ENGL 1410, ENGL 2080, ENGL 2090, or INOV 2100 are the second writing course options across the university.

English 1310: Rhetoric and Writing I is the first course of a two-semester written communication sequence required of all UCCS students. The course introduces students to academic reading and writing processes. Students develop critical reading, writing and thinking skills through class discussion, the rhetorical analysis of academic and civic texts, and the writing of documented analytical essays. Students analyze texts that were written for a variety of purposes and audiences. Emphasis is given to reading and writing processes as multiple and rhetorically diverse. Course content focuses on writing process theory and rhetorical theory and criticism-language matters-as the subject matter of rhetoric and writing as a discipline. Students explore language theory and practice through diverse frameworks: multicultural language practices; the reading and criticism of classics of American rhetoric, and issues in literacy, language and technology. The course serves two complementary purposes-to prepare writers for academic reading and writing assignments at the university level, and to introduce students to rhetoric and writing as a field of study unto itself. Signature features of the UCCS ENGL 1310 experience include: rhetoric and writing process theory; writing instruction in a computer-mediated classroom; low course caps of 19 students; extensive small group and whole class discussion, and one-on-one writing conferences for all ENGL 1310 students.

English 1410: Rhetoric and Writing II is the second course of a two-semester written communication sequence required of all UCCS students. The course focuses on academic argument and inquiry and builds upon the basic analytical and rhetorical proficiencies learned in ENGL 1310. In ENGL 1410 students extend their inquiry across time and write researched arguments on substantive issues. Writers use classical stasis theory for the rhetorical invention of arguments. They also use Stephen Toulmin's concepts of warrant, backing, grounds, data, and claim to evaluate micro arguments embedded within their essays. Writers engage in extended inquiry, which enables them to investigate their chosen issue in its complexity. They invent appropriate ethical, pathetic and logical appeals, and reason dialectically. Students effectively map complex issues, accurately summarize and responsibly present counterclaims, and then strategically cast their argument in stases deemed effective for their rhetorical situations. Students learn foundational information literacy competencies that are integral to the research process.

English 2080 and English 2090, offered by the Technical Writing Program, each satisfy the second writing course requirements for students in the College of Engineering and College of Business.

ENGL 2080 Business & Administrative Writing. For all students and especially business and science majors. Focus is on developing writing, reading, and thinking skills through class discussion, analysis of business and administrative texts, and creating documents such as proposals, reports, letters and memos, and presentations. Prer., ENGL 1310 or equivalent. Students learn foundational information literacy competencies that are integral to the research process.

ENGL 2090 Technical Writing & Presentation. Familiarizes students with the field of technical writing and teaches them to compose technical information effectively. Taught in a networked classroom with access to software tools for the design of written and visual texts. Prer., ENGL 1310 or ENGL 1410. Students learn foundational information literacy competencies that are integral to the research process.

INOV 2100 - Technical Writing, Proposals, and Presentations. Technical writing course. Replaces ENGL 2090 for Bachelor of Innovation majors. Addresses five major types of technical writing: project reports, funding proposals, magazine and trade articles, technical reports, and journal articles. Includes peer review and critical assessments of others' writings. Prer., ENGL 1310.

 
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