Floods & other Natural Phenomena

Flooding in Colorado

In the late summer and early fall of 2013, the Colorado Front Range experienced one of the most devastating rounds of floods in recent history.  After several years of fighting wildfires, the sudden switch to managing flooding took Colorado by surprise and by storm.  Communities were devasted, with many people losing their homes and businesses.  The study of geography can help us to understand not only the impacts of flooding after it has happened, but also to predict and prepare for floods and other natural phenomena.  We've collected a few articles here that can help us to understand the geographic connections involved with the flooding.

The Boulder Creek Virtual Field Study

Boulder Creek Virtual Field Study

Created by A. David Hill and Michael N. Solem of the University of Colorado, Boulder, this site provides a self-guided study of the Boulder Creek located in Boulder, Colorado.  This is one of the main areas impacted by the flooding of 2013.  The virtual field trip includes a study guide and questions to quiz yourself to better understand this important urban-aquatic resource.

http://bcn.boulder.co.us/basin/watershed/flooding.html

http://weadartists.org/colorado-marking-floods

http://www.esri.com/services/disaster-response/floods/colorado-flooding-impact-map

I don't know how best to link this one: A Survey of Boulder Creek Floodplain Residents and Other ... - NOAA www.wdtb.noaa.gov/workshop/wdm/.../BoulderCreekFloodplain.pdf‎

Lessons from elsewhere. ▫ What we ... An Evaluation of the Boulder Creek. Local Flood ... Q. What does the term “100-year flood” mean? .... Geography and. http://www.esri.com/disaster