College of Business

UCCS Career & Placement Employers

Our mission is to support careers by bridging the gap between business students and the business community through internship and placement opportunities.

"The intern we found through the College of Business Career Development Center showed remarkable understanding of our business principles. I have complete confidence that she represents our business well to our customers, and I trusted her as the point person for our sponsors. In every situation, she was dependable and professional. She has been an incredible asset to our team," Misty Banta, Director of Community Partnerships, Big Dog Brag.

An internship is a partnership between individual students, their educational institutions, and companies or organizations where short-term work and learning experiences are offered to students. An internship is an ideal way for students to connect their classroom learning to the realities of daily business life.
· Internships can be full-time or part-time
· Internships can be paid or unpaid
· Internships can take place during an academic semester or on your company's timetable
· Interns can receive credit for their internship
· Internships may be part of a student's academic major or related to a career interest
· Internships have defined learning goals and are monitored for progress
· Internships promote academic, career, and personal development goals

Internships provide a cost-efficient way to bring eager and talented workers into your company to support a variety of work functions. In addition, internships offer several other benefits, including:
· A means to advance or develop projects or services for your company
· An opportunity to study trends in order to determine future business decisions
· A method for identifying potential new hires
· A community relations program that develops strong ties between educational institutions and your organization
· An opportunity to allow for mentoring of students by company representatives

The UCCS College of Business (COB) was established in 1965 to help supply Colorado Springs businesses with a talented and well-educated work force. The COB awards the Bachelor of Science in Business degree, the Bachelor of Innovation in Business, and the Master of Business Administration degree (MBA). The degree programs are accredited by the AACSB International: The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. This accreditation places the COB in the top 30% of business schools nationally. Our students can specialize in:
- Accounting
- Business Administration
- Finance
- Marketing
- Management
- Human Resources
- PGA Golf Management (accredited by the PGA of America)
- Services Management
- Sport Management
- Information Systems
- International Business

You are certain to find a student who would be eager to learn from you and who can be an asset to your organization!

To create an internship, there are a few important steps that you, the employer, need to take:
1. Define your goals for the internship program.
2. Build support for the program at all levels. To be able to assist student interns in gaining a valuable experience, you will need to have support at all levels of your business. You also need the commitment of your top management for success.
3. Plan ahead by answering the following questions:
· Will you pay the intern? If so, how much?
· Do you have adequate workspace for an intern?
· What academic background and experience do you want in an intern?
· What will your intern be doing?
· Who will supervise and mentor the intern? In the supervisor/mentor relationship, a significant amount of learning occurs. Having someone supervise the intern who enjoys this type of work and knows the industry is crucial.
· How will you evaluate the intern's progress?
· How will you orient the intern to the workplace?
4. Develop a relationship with the Career Development Center. A partnership with us will help you advertise the position, manage the intern, provide necessary feedback, and ensure continuity for your internship program.

Sometimes employers feel that recruiting interns is the most challenging part of an internship program. That's where we can help the most. Our goal is to help you find the right match for your internship. A few tips for the recruiting process:
·Start early. Begin the process about 1 to 2 months before you want the intern to begin work.
·Be seen on campus. Participate in our semi-annual Career Networking Night (CNN), mock interviews or the campus-wide Career Fair held every semester.
·Create a thoughtful, well-defined position description. Provide as much detail as possible about what the student can expect from the internship.
·Pay is not a requirement but does tend to attract the more competitive candidates.
·Choose carefully. Hiring interns that "fit" your organization will help them have a good experience and possibly become candidates for permanent positions.

In order for you to have a successful experience with your student interns, we suggest that you consider the following as you develop or enhance your internship program:
Orientation
Provide your intern with an orientation to your company, your office environment, and introductions to key personnel and services. This will help your intern become productive more quickly.
Access to appropriate resources
Make sure your interns have access to equipment and resources they will need to perform their work duties appropriately. This should include a computer work station if necessary, access to telephones, e-mail, office supplies and equipment, etc.
Regular contact and feedback
Schedule time to meet with your intern regularly. Most supervisors find that initially they need to set aside daily time to work with their intern. After the intern has become acclimated, weekly meetings are suggested.
Inclusion
Make an effort to include your intern in staff meetings, lunches (when appropriate), and other gatherings. Include them on e-mail updates, and encourage other staff members to do the same.
Immediate explanations
Don't wait for questions. Interns sometimes don't know enough to ask the right questions (or any questions at all). Take the time to explain policies, procedures, and how you would like the assigned work to be done. This will pay off for you in the long run, as you will see errors early on and be able to take corrective action.
Useful and meaningful projects
No one likes "busy work," and you certainly aren't using your intern's talents to the fullest by assigning menial tasks. Take the time to learn your intern's skills and strengths, then make assignments based on what the student can offer you and your company.
Evaluation
An internship is a learning experience. What distinguishes an internship from a job is that you and the intern negotiate learning goals at the beginning of the experience; subsequently, you evaluate those goals and work performance at the end of the experience. Build in both informal and formal evaluation opportunities throughout the internship.

·All employers will then be asked to create a Business Connect profile: www.uccs.edu/business/careers.html
·From Business Connect you will be able to:

  • Connect with interested students
  • Upload job descriptions
  • Receive applications & Resumes
  • Completely control your search

·Once you upload your offering to Business Connect, we will publicize the internship opportunity in emails to our students and through the website.
·Once students begin to respond to your posting, it is up to you to decide whom to interview, and choose who you feel will best fit what you are looking for.
·We will continuously keep all lines of communication open and promote all internship opportunities to College of Business students, but we cannot guarantee that candidates will be found for any particular position

Questions? Contact the Career Development Center in the College of Business at UCCS at 719-255-3120 or cobplace@uccs.edu.

 
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